environment

The president elect of the United States is known as a climate change denier and that has some environmental activists saying now is the time to organize.

Florida conservation officials say a female panther has crossed a river, and it could be a big deal for the survival of the species.

Florida panthers are endangered — about 200 of the large cats live in south Florida, in an area that's less than 5 percent of their original range. If the animal is to thrive, it needs to do two things: expand its territory and breed.

Endangered Florida Panther Expands its Range

Nov 15, 2016

Florida wildlife authorities say the state's panther population is expanding beyond the endangered animal's primary habitat in southwest Florida.

For the first time in more than 40 years wildlife authorities have discovered evidence of a female Florida panther north of the Caloosahatchee River.

Sue Schaf / Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Sea turtle nesting season  wrapped up at the end of October. The data is still being compiled, but initial reports indicate it was a particularly good year for one species.

"It was a great year for loggerheads this year, even with the storms," said Sue Schaf, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Years of Living Dangerously/National Geographic Channel

What does Miami have in common with National Geographic and actor Jack Black?

 

The answer's not obvious: climate change.

 

Mark Hedden

It's easy to spot birders. They probably have binoculars and a field guide handy. And there’s a good chance they keep a list of which birds they’ve seen, when and where.

But there’s a rare subspecies of birder you can see in South Florida every fall at the Florida Keys Hawkwatch.

Those are counters.

A trial over a 26-year water fight between Florida and Georgia is underway before the U.S. Supreme Court.  A special master appointed by the court began hearing arguments Monday. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

A group concerned about the Florida’s water is taking its message on the road.

The Now-or-Neverglades bus tour rolled through the Town of Palm Beach on Monday. The Everglades Foundation kicked off the 12-day road trip last week to drum up support for building a water storage reservoir in the Everglades Agriculture Area - southwest of Belle Glade.

Toxic Algae Found To Be Growing Global Concern

Oct 26, 2016

New research shows toxic algae blooms like those that plagued Florida’s coastal estuaries this summer are a growing global problem.

Research from the U.S. Geological Survey shows toxic algae blooms have been reported nationwide and are implicated in human and animal illness and death in at least 43 states.

An invasive fern is at the heart of a dispute threatening a national wildlife refuge in the Florida Everglades. 

The South Florida Water Management District owns the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the 144,000-acre refuge, but now the water management district is threatening to terminate its 65-year lease. 

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The jury hearing the federal trial of seven people who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon entered a fourth day of deliberations Wednesday — a day after jurors' ability to reach a verdict came into question.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

What do climate change and Halloween have in common?

 

They're both pretty scary, according to people at a climate rally Sunday in downtown Miami.

 

Gavin Baker, via Flickr

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is assessing Hurricane Matthew’s damage to Florida’s beaches. Beaches in central and north Florida sustained the worst damage. In Flagler County a stretch of A1A collapsed. In St. Johns County a new inlet was carved out of the shoreline.

Jackie Keiser of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the damage is significant considering the economic boost beaches give to tourism and property values.

“We’re looking at on the order just in Florida $100 million to potentially $300 million to put that sand back.”

Pat Sullivan / AP via Miami Herald

Fracking is now banned in Miami-Dade County, thanks to an ordinance passed unanimously last Wednesday by county commissioners.

 

The process captures natural gas reserves by injecting high pressure streams of water, sand and chemicals into the earth. The Miami-Dade ordinance says fracking could contaminate county water supplies, including the Biscayne Aquifier, where many South Florida residents get their water.

 

Water containing low-level radiation and other pollutants has poured into Florida's primary drinking water aquifer through a gaping sinkhole 45 feet wide.

It happened at a plant owned by fertilizer giant Mosaic in central Florida's rural Polk County, Robin Sussingham of member station WUSF reports.

Pages