energy

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12/15/14 - Should Americans be wary of hydraulically fractured mines?  You might be more aware of the term “fracking,” as it pertains to natural gas removal.  Join us for Monday’s Topical Currents when we discuss both pro & con fracking. Our guest this hour is Wall Street Journal energy reporter Russell Gold.

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  Fats, oils and grease from your favorite restaurant in Broward County will be converted to produce energy for its waste-water treatment plant in Pompano Beach.

The project, which launched last week, will impact the community both economically and environmentally.   

“We are looking at a savings of $27 million over the 17-year period,” says Broward Mayor Barbara Sharief.

Mayor Sharief says this process will create more than 400 jobs, reduce emissions that pollute the air by 30 percent and energy consumption for the county.  

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An energy bill that is nearing passage in the Florida Legislature would strike an old solar rebate program from the books.

The program was more popular than expected, and when it ended in 2010, thousands of rebate holders hadn’t received all of the money they were due.

Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam has recommended that lawmakers clean up state statutes by eliminating the rebate program. Since the program has ended, he says it's no longer needed on the books.

Rick Stone

There was an odd moment at the Solar Uprising rally at the state capitol on Thursday, which Charlie Crist attended to be seen championing solar energy for our state.

It was provided by a woman named Debbie Dooley, who addressed the crowd a few minutes before Crist took the stage. What she said was this: "I know I'm unique in this crowd because I like Gov. Scott. But he's wrong on the issue of solar." 

http://john-perlin.com/

01/28/14 - Tuesday's Topical Currents looks at the history and viability of solar energy.  Portugal leads the way in European solar energy, with 70% of its electricity generated from the sun.  Some 20% of California’s electrical grid is solar powered.

A controversial nuclear power plant situated on a stretch of India's southeastern coast that was hit hard by the 2004 Asian tsunami has begun supplying the grid with electricity, officials say.

The Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant, a joint project with Russia located at the country's southern extremity in Tamil Nadu state, was connected to the grid on Tuesday, The Indian Express reports.

Forty years ago this week, the U.S. was hit by an oil shock that reverberates until this day.

Arab oil producers cut off exports to the U.S. to protest American military support for Israel in its 1973 war with Egypt and Syria. This brought soaring gas prices and long lines at filling stations, and it contributed to a major economic downturn in the U.S.

The embargo made the U.S. feel heavily dependent on Middle Eastern oil, which in turn led the U.S. to focus on instability in that region, which has since included multiple wars and other U.S. military interventions.

Are FPL Customers Paying $43M For Nuclear Projects That May Never Happen?

Oct 1, 2013
www.fpl.com

Florida Power & Light customers will pay nearly $43.5 million next year for nuclear-power projects, including $16.2 million for a plan to eventually build two new reactors in Miami-Dade County, state regulators decided Tuesday.

The project costs will have relatively little impact on customers' monthly bills. A residential customer who uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a month will pay about 46 cents.

The Environmental Protection Agency's second stab at a proposal to set the first-ever limits on greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants would make it impossible for companies to build the kind of coal-fired plants that have been the country's biggest source of electricity for decades.

Under the proposal, released Friday, any new plant that runs on coal would be permitted to emit only about half as much carbon dioxide as an average coal plant puts into the air today.

FPL

The demand for electricity is growing in South Florida, but Florida Power and Light has been tearing down power plants.

The power plants like the one in the slideshow above have been generating electricity for more than 50 years in many cases. Often, they burned oil to make power.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Energy

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