alpima / Flickr

Know the joke about how many college students it takes to screw in a light bulb?

Probably not, since it’s not a real joke. Nor is the decision some comedians are making to avoid college campuses where they say students today are too easily offended.

Back in June, comedian Jerry Seinfeld told ESPN radio that he was joining Chris Rock, Larry the Cable Guy and others who won’t play college campuses because they’ve become too politically correct.

John O'Connor / WLRN

You might be forgiven for mistaking Miami Beach High School’s auditorium for the Fillmore Thursday.

Students waved lit cellphones above their heads.

They sang along with “whoa-oh-oh” choruses.

But when the concert ended,  they got a lesson in what some have dubbed nature’s most powerful force.

“It’s called compounding interest," says Gooding, the guitarist who uses only the one name professionally and is lead singer of a band by the same name (though in all caps). "Raise your hand if you know what compounding interest is? I won’t make you say it. Awesome.”

stanfordedtech / Flickr

Last week the international  Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development released the results of a global study looking at the effect of technology on 15-year-olds' test scores.

The group oversees one of the most important international exams, so its research matters.

gonzalewis / Flickr

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle raised sharp questions Thursday about a study that Florida Department of Education officials say validated the state's controversial new standardized test for public-school students.

Members of the Senate Education Pre-K-12 Committee reviewed the study of the Florida Standards Assessment, as the new test is called, and suggested that the department had portrayed the report's conclusions in an overly optimistic light and wondered whether teacher evaluations and school grades should be tied to the exam.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

With fresh haircuts and the knowledge lunch would be waiting on the bus when they arrived, about two dozen Miami Northwestern High School students headed to Washington, D.C. early Thursday morning.

This is an annual trip put together by an organization called 5000 Role Models of Excellence. The group arranges service projects for students who join the club and helps them find mentors.

They’ll be meeting with Civil Rights leader and U.S. Rep. John Lewis, attending the Congressional Black Caucus’ annual conference and visiting the White House.

ivydawned / Flickr

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has closed its six-month  investigation into a cyber attack during Florida Standards Assessments testing this spring.

The agency isn't saying who tried to shut down testing by overloading servers or why. But law enforcement officials said no personal student data was accessed during the attack.

FDLE said it  found that more than 29,000 Internet addresses were used to swamp servers run by test contractor American Institutes for Research. Some of the addresses were in the U.S., but most were believed to be foreign.

Screen shot / U.S. Department of Education

Lots of schools promise to train students to be nurses, technicians or for other in-demand medical careers. But a new federal database shows that isn’t always the case.

At some schools,  only a small percentage of students who attend using federal grants or loans earn more than a high school graduate a decade after enrolling in college.

The data links students who received federal financial aid to what they reported earning on their tax forms a decade later.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

For weeks now, Palm Beach County schools have struggled to get students to classes on time.

Bus routes have been redrawn. And the district sent up flares, looking to hire anyone who wants to drive a bus.

It’s the first crisis new superintendent Robert Avossa has had to face since taking over the job in June. And he says it could have been avoided if district leaders had listened.

Pike Architects / Florida Keys Community College

Florida Keys Community College is based in Key West, at the end of the island chain. That's where it has its campus, including classrooms, library, dormitories and administration.

For decades, the college has offered classes in the Middle and Upper Keys through "centers" that collaborate with other institutions like the Monroe County School District.

Republican presidential hopeful Marco Rubio says the U.S. doesn't need a federal Education Department, arguing that its recommendations to state and local governments often turn into mandates tied to money.

The Florida senator made the comments Tuesday during a town hall meeting in Carson City. About 200 people attended the gathering in a community center, part of a tour of northern Nevada.

Florida Statewide Student Testing Called Valid

Sep 1, 2015
Florida Department of Education / Flickr


A review of Florida's new statewide test has found the exam is valid and the results can be used to judge teacher and school performance, the Florida Department of Education announced.

But the review also found that after problems with computerized testing, "scores for some students will be suspect." The reviewers recommend that state test scores not be the sole basis to determine whether students graduate or if they are placed in remedial courses.

Robin Sussingham / StateImpact Florida

At last count, during the 2013-2014 school year, the number of homeless students had risen to more than 71,000 in Florida's public schools. For many of these children, a brand-new school uniform may be out of reach, though school officials say it makes a big impact on their attitude. One longtime charity in Lakeland is quietly helping to fill that need.

The new school year starts up soon and teachers are already preparing. A beginning teacher boot camp at Saint Leo University on Friday brought together 20 recent graduates who will take over a classroom this year. The idea is to give the new teachers a final low-down before students sit at their desks ready to learn. 

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

For the first time in decades, the majority of U.S. school children come from low-income families.

Florida has one of the highest rates in the country -- federal data shows just seven states have a higher percentage of low-income students.

stevendepolo / Flickr

Palm Beach County teachers soon could be able to stock their classrooms for free.

The Education Foundation of Palm Beach County says it hopes to open a school supply store in the spring for teachers working in Palm Beach County's poorest schools.

Christina Lambert with the foundation says teachers will be able to visit the store often.

“We hope that we’re able to provide an opportunity for these teachers to shop monthly," she says, "and to get about $200 worth of supplies each time they shop.”