diversity

Charles Trainor Jr / Miami Herald

Youssef Wardani never considered himself an activist.

He’s a fairly soft-spoken software engineer. He’s very organized and believes everything should have a plan from start to finish.

Activism for him was a sudden evolution  sparked by a Broward teacher who called his 14-year-old son a "raghead Taliban” and the bureaucracy of a school system he felt ignored him when he demanded accountability.

His son, Deyab-Houssein Wardani, 14, is a ninth grader at Cypress Bay High School in Weston. Everyone calls him D.H.

Schplook / Flickr/Creative Commons

    

  On the Florida Roundup, we talk to the area's journalists about the week's top stories.

2011 Memorial Day Weekend Shooting

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Broward County School Board voted Tuesday to suspend a teacher who was accused of calling her student "a raghead Taliban."

Maria Valdes, a French teacher at Cypress Bay High School, will be suspended for five days without pay and must complete mandatory diversity training.

The school board passed the item with no discussion.

Valdes allegedly made the comments to 14-year-old Deyab Houssein Wardani as he entered class wearing a hoodie.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

It happened again.

Spanish-language, Miami-area-based Univision -- the nation's fifth-largest television network -- has another racial insensitivity mess to clean up.

On Wednesday, Univision talk show host and fashion commentator Rodner Figueroa said first lady Michelle Obama -- America's first African-American first lady -- looks like an apocalyptic ape.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Michelllaurence (https://flic.kr/p/8SkJue)

Palm Beach County commissioners decided Tuesday to spend $750,000 on a new disparity study to see if a disproportionate amount of contracts have been awarded to white, male-owned businesses, as opposed to women- and minority-owned businesses.

Because of a 1989 Supreme Court ruling, cities can’t set up special programs to favor minorities until there’s evidence of discrimination.

Miami Honors NPR Host Michel Martin

May 7, 2014
NPR

Don't be surprised if you see Michel Martin tearing up a bit on Thursday, May 8, when she visits Miami to receive this year's Hank Meyer Headliner Award -- even she's worried about crying a little.

It's her very pathos and determination to pull people from all aspects of life into roundtable discussions and in-depth interviews that have earned the host of NPR's "Tell Me More" the award, from the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews.

Tom Hudson

As a regular digital feature of the Sunshine Economy, we'll be asking local CEOs how they got where they are and what they think of the business community in South Florida.  

Suzan McDowell is the President and CEO of Circle of One Marketing, a public-relations and community-outreach firm. A Jamaican-American, Suzan was named one of South Florida’s top 50 Most Powerful Black Business Leaders of 2013 by Legacy Magazine and the Miami Herald.

Last week, Julie Chen revealed on The Talk that she had double eyelid surgery to make her eyes look "less Chinese" in order to advance her TV career.

A new map clearly demarcates the racial divide in the United States through colorful dots, showing the demographics of South Florida and highlighting the striking partitions of how we live.

For example, most people know that Miami Beach is primarily a mix of white and Hispanic and that North Miami is mostly white east of Biscayne Boulevard and predominantly black on the west side. But there is more that can be read into the map.

Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Aug 27, 2013
Isabel Echarte

Michelle Antelo was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.

But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.

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