Cuba

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How often do you see a classic American car on the road?  Every week?  Once a month?  Once in a blue moon?

You know the kind: tail fins, mammoth headlights, painted from front grill to back bumper some sort of electric Crayola crayon color and looking like it was just driven straight off the set of “Grease.”

In Cuba, they’re all over the place. 

Ramon Espinosa / Associated Press

The Cuban flag was raised in Washington, D.C. on Monday, marking the beginning of a new era in normalizing relations between the island and U.S.

Secretary of State John Kerry and Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez held a press conference at the Department of State on Monday.

The two men acknowledged that there are still vast differences between the two governments -- one of those being the perception of human rights.

In Miami, some protestors gathered outside Versailles Cafe, to protest the opening of the embassy in Washington, D.C.

Sam Sharpe/USA TODAY Sports

President Barack Obama's overtures to Cuba really kicked into high gear recently with the official re-opening of embassies in Havana and Washington.

But re-establishing diplomatic relations after more than half a century isn't a cure-all. Washington and Havana are still divided on many fronts, such as the ongoing US embargo, Cuba's poor treatment of dissidents on the island and the prison at Guantanamo Bay, though White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Wednesday the administration was close to a deal for shuttering the prison.

(This post was last updated at 10:45 a.m. ET.)

After 54 years of animosity, the United States and Cuba have formally restored diplomatic ties.

That means that the U.S. opened an embassy in Havana and Cuba opened an embassy in Washington, D.C., this morning.

Mimi Whitefield / Miami Herald

As the U.S. and Cuba re-establish diplomatic relations today – and open embassies in their respective capitals – all eyes are on Washington D.C. and Havana.

Except perhaps in South Florida. Here, all Cuban politics is local. So we care less about the hot air rising today in the Beltway (where U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodríguez will meet) and in La Habana later this summer (when Kerry plans to visit and inaugurate a U.S. embassy there) and more about what this means for Miami-Dade, the Keys, Broward and Palm Beach.

Mark Hedden / For WLRN

When he was young, Jim Hale told a friend he was going to move to Key West and become "the pigeon king." His friend, a budding comedian, thought that was an excellent joke. But Hale was serious.

He did move to the Keys, 30 years ago, and he started keeping and breeding racing pigeons. He's been successful with that, and he's got an unexpected sideline: rescuing the racing pigeons that wind up in the Keys after they're blown off course from Cuba.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8065/8266066249_2bac85a7c5_z.jpg
Don McDougall / flickr Creative Commons

Today on the Florida Roundup, how Carnival Corporation got the go-ahead from the U.S. to cruise to Cuba and how it will affect the island. 

RELATED: HOW AMERICANS CAN TRAVEL TO CUBA

Cuban dissidents are still experiencing violence on the island, but is it a sign that Obama's normalization policy is not working?

How Americans Can Travel To Cuba

Jul 8, 2015
Carnival Corporation / Courtesy

The Cuban travel market bandwagon has recently gotten fuller.

The latest entrant, Carnival Corporation, joins multiple ferry companies and airline companies working to offer trips to the island.

Here's a list of all the ways people dreaming of Havana nights can travel to Cuba, how much they cost, and possible destinations.

HOW TO GET THERE

1. Carnival cruises

Miami Herald

The world’s largest cruise line is the latest entrant to the Cuban travel market. Carnival Corporation announced Tuesday that it had received permission from the U.S. Department of the Treasury and Department of Commerce to launch cruises to Cuba beginning in May 2016.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

President Obama’s announcement last week that the U.S. will restore diplomatic relations with communist Cuba on July 20 – and will open an embassy there a few days after – is angering South Florida lawmakers.

Their options to stop the Administration are limited. But they’re moving against Obama’s new engagement policy nonetheless, and it’s shaping up as one of the summer’s big political battles.

The rhetoric from the Cuban-American congressional caucus is rising with the humid temperature in Washington, D.C.

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