common core

What To Watch At This Week's Education Summit

Aug 26, 2013
Teresa Stillman teaches at Cannella Elementary in Hillsborough County.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

As we’ve attended summer training sessions for teachers on new Common Core State Standards, we’ve been asking teachers the same three questions.

Florida is one of 45 states to fully adopt the Common Core State Standards, which outline what students are expected to know in math and English at the end of each grade. Every grade in Florida is scheduled to use the standards beginning next school year.

Yesterday we told you that we spent a lot of time at summer Common Core training sessions for teachers.

One of the things we were curious about is how teachers felt about the new education standards fully adopted by Florida and 44 other states.

We asked teachers the same three questions about Common Core as they prepared for next year’s deadline to use the standards in every Florida classroom.

The start of the school year in Florida and many parts of the country has meant a glut of new education polls asking about shared education standards, standardized testing, teacher evaluations and policies adopted by Florida and other states.

The most noteworthy poll is the annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll of education issues. This is the 45th year of the poll. The poll sampled 1,001 adults and had a margin of error of 3.8 percent.

The St. Johns County Republican Assembly is the latest GOP group to ask questions — quite literally — about new education standards fully adopted by Florida and 44 other states.

Educators say the percentage of students meeting state goals on Florida’s math and reading tests will decline after the state switches to new standards known as Common Core.

How bad will it be? Check out the test results released today in New York.

Just 31 percent of New York students in third through eighth grades were proficient on the new math and reading exam. Last year, 65 percent were proficient in math and 55 percent were proficient in English on different exams.

Indiana lawmakers held the first of a series of hearings on the future of Common Core State Standards yesterday.

The first hearing focused on the quality of the standards, while subsequent meetings will look at assessment and cost.

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