college

When the Obama administration announced last year that it would overhaul the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, prospective college students (and their parents) cheered. "Today, we're lending a hand to millions of high school students who want to go to college and who've worked hard," said Arne Duncan, who was at that time U.S. secretary of education. "We're announcing an easier, earlier FAFSA." And it is both. Earlier because it's now available to students in October instead...

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options. At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as...

A sign on the front door said only that the school would be closed for a day after Labor Day weekend. Through closed blinds, visitors could glimpse desks still laden with paperwork in offices where the lights had been left on. All morning, a steady stream of students pulled up out front of the Hialeah campus to see if the news was true: ITT Tech, one of the largest chains of for-profit colleges in the country, with more than 40,000 students spread across 130 campuses nationwide, was closed...

Dwight Burdette / Creative Commons

For-profit colleges have gotten some unwanted government attention lately—for aggressive recruiting and high interest rates on loans, and for misleading students about what their degrees will help them accomplish. The for-profit giant Corinthian Colleges shut down a year ago. Now another large operator, ITT Technical Institute, looks like it might be next: It is losing students quickly, its stock price has plunged to $2 a share, and the Obama administration is pushing to shut down the ac...

I step up to the counter at Willy's Cafe at Willamette High School in Eugene, Ore., and order a latte. There's a powerful scent of fresh coffee in the air, and a group of juniors and seniors hover over a large espresso machine. Carrie Gilbert, 17, shows how it's done: "You're going to want to steam the milk first," she explains. "Then once you have the coffee, dump it in and use the rest of the milk to fill the cup." She hands over my order. Not bad. Yes, this is a class, and these students...

John O'Connor / WLRN

One day after a shooter killed nine people and himself at an Oregon community college, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said she’ll seek tougher gun laws if she’s elected. Clinton made the pledge to about 1,000 people at a Friday campaign rally at Broward College’s Davie campus. Clinton said people shouldn’t be afraid to attend class or see a movie. “I am going to fight for new, effective gun control measures,” she said The pledge drew the biggest response from the crowd....

alpima / Flickr

Know the joke about how many college students it takes to screw in a light bulb? Probably not, since it’s not a real joke. Nor is the decision some comedians are making to avoid college campuses where they say students today are too easily offended. Back in June, comedian Jerry Seinfeld told ESPN radio that he was joining Chris Rock, Larry the Cable Guy and others who won’t play college campuses because they’ve become too politically correct. “I hear that all the time," Seinfeld told ESPN...

www.broward.edu

09/23/15 - Join us for Wednesday’s Topical Currents when we focus on Broward College Online .

Screen shot / U.S. Department of Education

Lots of schools promise to train students to be nurses, technicians or for other in-demand medical careers. But a new federal database shows that isn’t always the case. At some schools, only a small percentage of students who attend using federal grants or loans earn more than a high school graduate a decade after enrolling in college. The data links students who received federal financial aid to what they reported earning on their tax forms a decade later. Just one-third of students who...

Florida Board of Education

A State Board of Education member is questioning the number of sexual assaults reported on state college campuses. Rebecca Fishman Lipsey believes it is unlikely that, in the most recent data, there were only seven forcible sexual assaults reported by the 28-college, 400,000 student system. Those figures do not include crime data for the dozen schools in the state’s university system. On Wednesday, Fishman Lipsey began the board meeting by handing out pages of state college system crime data....

Court To Weigh Allowing Guns In University Housing

Jul 8, 2015

After a high-profile legislative debate this spring about concealed weapons on college campuses, a state appeals court is poised to hear arguments in a dispute about whether guns should be allowed in residence halls and other housing at the University of Florida. The 1st District Court of Appeal next Tuesday is scheduled to take up a case filed by the group Florida Carry Inc., which says people have a legal right to possess firearms in their homes, including in university housing. An Alachua...

Steven Martin / Flickr/Creative Commons

A twist to the end of the state legislative session means lawmakers need to reconvene again. Legislative Session With no agreement on a budget, the Florida House adjourned three days early from the legislative session. The feud between House and Senate members on Medicaid expansion has led to most of the delay. Bills have been left behind. Senate Democrats filed a motion to the state Supreme Court to get House members back to work Thursday. Senate President Andy Gardiner has suggested that...

Explaining Florida's For-Profit College Industry

Apr 27, 2015
Kirk Carapezza / WGBH

Miami Herald reporter Michael Vasquez has spent a year digging into Florida's for-profit college industry for a series called Higher Ed Hustle. About 300,000 Florida students attend for-profit colleges, which often specialize in training low-skill workers for a new career. But students often find their degree doesn't qualify for the career they were seeking, and they graduate with tens of thousands of dollars in debt. Vasquez spoke with StateImpact Florida about what he discovered: Michael,...

M.S. Butler / StateImpact Florida

A college education is generally considered a student's best shot at getting a good job these days, and it's often assumed most high schoolers are prepared to attend college. But there's one group that has been quietly excluded from that process -- students with intellectual disabilities. A program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg is giving these students college experience that, while it's not a traditional degree, is giving them a head start on their career goals. It's a...

dsb nola / Flickr

New college graduates are finding it easier to land their first jobs -- and unemployment rates are dropping for most degree holders. But paychecks are still getting smaller for most recent grads, according to a study from Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce . The study shows that unemployment was down for nearly every category of majors in 2012, the only exception being communications and journalism. Science and engineering grads had the lowest unemployment rate,...

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