college

A large group of students walked out of the University of Notre Dame's commencement ceremony Sunday in protest of Vice President Mike Pence's policies.

Video from the event shows people applauding followed by loud boos as the vice president began a commencement address at the school, while dozens of students began to file out from the floor of the stadium.

The walkout was planned in protest at what organizers called Pence's policies that "have marginalized our vulnerable sisters and brothers for their religion, skin color, or sexual orientation."

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

Students from the Middle East, Asia and Latin America are growing more fearful of attending college in the US.

That’s according to a recent survey by the American Association of College Registrar and Admissions Officers. Higher education institutions have reported a decline in international student applications and, experts say, the current political climate is a factor.

Two years ago, when Amanda Gomez could not get financial aid for community college, she decided to enroll part time at El Paso Community College in Texas. This gave her time to work to pay for her courses.

Being a part-time student has its pros — mainly a lighter course load. But Gomez feels like she misses out on some important experiences, like being able to stay back after class to talk to her instructors, or study in libraries on campus.

She says the difference was notable when she took a semester as a full-time student.

Priscila Serrano / WLRN

As many high schools seniors are busy preparing for college, five students from two South Florida schools are devoting their time to delivering a sensitive, yet important message.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

By now, it's fair to say South Carolina is a better team than Mississippi State. The Gamecocks' 67-55 win in the national title game Sunday was South Carolina's third — and most convincing — win over the Bulldogs this season.

The women's first basketball championship is all the more impressive since the team lost senior center Alaina Coates to an ankle injury before the tournament started.

When the Obama administration announced last year that it would overhaul the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, prospective college students (and their parents) cheered.

"Today, we're lending a hand to millions of high school students who want to go to college and who've worked hard," said Arne Duncan, who was at that time U.S. secretary of education. "We're announcing an easier, earlier FAFSA."

And it is both.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options.

At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as students input information on laptops. 

A sign on the front door said only that the school would be closed for a day after Labor Day weekend. Through closed blinds, visitors could glimpse desks still laden with paperwork in offices where the lights had been left on.

All morning, a steady stream of students pulled up out front of the Hialeah campus to see if the news was true: ITT Tech, one of the largest chains of for-profit colleges in the country, with more than 40,000 students spread across 130 campuses nationwide, was closed for good.

Dwight Burdette / Creative Commons

For-profit colleges have gotten some unwanted government attention lately—for aggressive recruiting and high interest rates on loans, and for misleading students about what their degrees will help them accomplish.

The for-profit giant Corinthian Colleges shut down a year ago. Now another large operator, ITT Technical Institute, looks like it might be next: It is losing students quickly, its stock price has plunged to $2 a share, and the Obama administration is pushing to shut down the accreditors that oversee this school and many other for-profit colleges.

I step up to the counter at Willy's Cafe at Willamette High School in Eugene, Ore., and order a latte.

There's a powerful scent of fresh coffee in the air, and a group of juniors and seniors hover over a large espresso machine.

Carrie Gilbert, 17, shows how it's done: "You're going to want to steam the milk first," she explains. "Then once you have the coffee, dump it in and use the rest of the milk to fill the cup."

She hands over my order. Not bad.

John O'Connor / WLRN

One day after a shooter killed nine people and himself at an Oregon community college, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said she’ll seek tougher gun laws if she’s elected.

Clinton made the pledge to about 1,000 people at a Friday campaign rally at Broward College’s Davie campus. Clinton said people shouldn’t be afraid to attend class or see a movie.

“I am going to fight for new, effective gun control measures,” she said

The pledge drew the biggest response from the crowd. Clinton said that changing gun laws is a “political mountain.”

alpima / Flickr

Know the joke about how many college students it takes to screw in a light bulb?

Probably not, since it’s not a real joke. Nor is the decision some comedians are making to avoid college campuses where they say students today are too easily offended.

Back in June, comedian Jerry Seinfeld told ESPN radio that he was joining Chris Rock, Larry the Cable Guy and others who won’t play college campuses because they’ve become too politically correct.

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09/23/15 - Join us for Wednesday’s Topical Currents when we focus on Broward College Online

Screen shot / U.S. Department of Education

Lots of schools promise to train students to be nurses, technicians or for other in-demand medical careers. But a new federal database shows that isn’t always the case.

At some schools,  only a small percentage of students who attend using federal grants or loans earn more than a high school graduate a decade after enrolling in college.

The data links students who received federal financial aid to what they reported earning on their tax forms a decade later.

Florida Board of Education

A State Board of Education member is questioning the number of sexual assaults reported on state college campuses.

Rebecca Fishman Lipsey believes it is unlikely that, in the most recent data, there were only seven forcible sexual assaults reported by the 28-college, 400,000 student system. Those figures do not include crime data for the dozen schools in the state’s university system.

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