coffee

Coffee lovers, alert! A new report says that the world's coffee supply may be in danger owing to climate change. In the world's biggest coffee-producing nation, Brazil, the effects of warming temperatures are already being felt in some communities.

10/24/14 - Syndicated food columnist Linda Gassenheimer, Special wine correspondent Fred Tasker and WLRN hosts Joseph Cooper and Bonnie Berman interview Edgardo Texidor, Corporate Trainer for Juan Valdez coffee.  We talk Colombian coffee, the different types, how to make a great cup and how to taste coffee.  We taste test with him, called a cupping session.  

Mad Chiller / Courtesy

At Mad Chiller, a pop-up coffee-shop-cum-art-gallery, culture is on the menu alongside locally roasted coffee and organic liege waffles.

The Mad Chiller coffee chariot – not to be mistaken for an ordinary cart – has been rolling into local arts events for nearly two years, but now the chariot will become immobile. Mad Chiller will be taking up permanent residence at the Miami Center for Architecture and Design on Sept. 12.

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07/22/14 - Tuesday’s Topical Currents looks at the most popular drug in 

Wilson Sayre

David’s Café, an iconic South Beach haunt for locals and tourists alike, closed its doors for good this weekend.

Located the corner of 11th Street and Collins Avenue, David’s was flanked road construction that has dragged on for almost a year. The project has blocked sidewalks and increased gridlock. Adrian Gonzalez, owner, blamed the construction and the recession for sealing the café’s fate.

Tom Hudson

  

How do you like your coffee? Cafe cubano? Latte? Black?  

American coffee consumption is growing again, including specialty, gourmet coffee.  Roasters in South Florida are going cup to cup with big national brands, which are working to bring cafe cubano blends to a national market.

Seattle-based coffee giant Starbucks has announced it's going to expand to Colombia.

The country is known for its Arabica beans and for the mythical coffee farmer Juan Valdez. He's helped sell Colombia's coffee for 50 years. Starbucks has cafes in 50 countries. And now, it's coming to perhaps the country most associated with coffee.

Howard Schultz, the company's chief executive, announced that the first shop will open in Bogota in 2014, followed by 50 more cafes and in other cities over five years.

As often as they can, Kelly Woodward and her fiance hop on Skype at 3:05 in the afternoon.

The Chicago native is now in Miami full-time leading Miami Food Tours. Her Colombian husband-to-be is in grad school at Notre Dame.

Their 3:05 chats are a excuse to catch up, but it’s mostly about Cuban coffee.

A movement began to make 3:05 p.m. the official Cuban coffee time of Miami. What started organically by a Miami PR rep Jenny Lee Molina has now been officially recognized by the city.

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Each day begins the same. It is want mixed with laziness. Which strikes me as why a café con leche is so perfect. The ‘want’ is the café. It is strong, primal, dark and concentrated. The ‘lazy’ is the leche, (the milk)…relaxing, passive, pure-white and life-giving. In the right ratio you can find the way to enter the day and go forth!

At the Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education (CATIE) in Turrialba, Costa Rica, you can touch the history of coffee — and also, if the optimists have their way, part of its future.

Here, spread across 25 acres, are coffee trees that take you back to coffee's origins.

"The story starts in Africa, no? East Africa," says Eduardo Somarriba, a researcher at CATIE, as we walk through long rows of small coffee trees.

The inspiration for NPR's Coffee Week arrived in an email last summer. I had just reported on the growing Third-Wave Movement in Coffee, and the burgeoning interest in coffee cuppings.

Coffee is a powerful beverage. On a personal level, it helps keep us awake and active. On a much broader level, it has helped shape our history and continues to shape our culture.

What does it take to find guilt-free coffee?

Much of our coffee comes from places where the environment is endangered and workers earn very little — sometimes, just a few dollars for a whole day's work. Coffee farmers have helped cut down tropical forests, and most of them use pesticides.

When we wanted to know how the growth of the specialty coffee movement is influencing the lives of farmers, we took a trip to the mountainous region of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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