climate change

In ‘Climate Change’ Controversy, A Tale Of Two Agencies

Jun 19, 2015
Tim Donovan / Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has a steering committee to address climate change. The commission maintains computer modeling programs that show how climate change will affect water and land crucial to wildlife. It holds regular seminars to educate staff on the latest climate science.

On its website, the commission has a “Climate Change 101” page that addresses key challenges the state faces.

Charles Trainor Jr / Miami Herald


Today on the Florida Roundup, Jeb Bush officially enters the race for the White House. How will he compete with Marco Rubio for the Hispanic vote in Florida?

Protestors in Little Haiti called on the president to take action on a Dominican Republic court ruling which may lead to mass deportation of Haitians living there.

KEENPRESS Photography/flickr

The Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) has taken up the cause of climate change in Florida. The national group claims 600,000 members or supporters around the country with more than 100,000 of them in Florida. It's funded by donations and grants.

EEN is part of the Floridians for Solar Choice coalition, which is pushing a constitutional amendment that would allow Floridians to buy electricity directly from someone other than a utility company.

Daniel Ducassi

President Barack Obama visited the Everglades last week to commemorate Earth Day and to talk about the risks climate change poses to South Florida, the nation, and the world. 

"If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it," the president said.

The president also used the opportunity to chide Governor Rick Scott for his administration’s unofficial ban of the phrase "climate change."

Chalk And Rising Seas Combine In Delray Beach

Apr 27, 2015
Lisann Ramos

If you took a stroll through Delray Beach this weekend, you may have noticed a white chalk line on certain sidewalks and roads.

Along three neighborhoods in Delray Beach a group of volunteers pushed a field marker to release three lines of chalk. Each line spans three miles.

The chalk was drawn on the line where scientists project floodwaters will reach in the next major storm. In Delray Beach that’s four feet above sea level.

Florida Power And Light wants to build two new power reactors at Turkey Point in south Miami-Dade.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission met with the public Wednesday at Florida International University to discuss concerns raised by the recent FPL proposal.

Florida Representative José Javier Rodriguez was one of those who spoke out against the idea.

“Basically, the application is seeking approval for two new units on a low peninsula into a shallow bay that’s already highly vulnerable to storm surge,” Rodriguez said.

Jenny Staletovich / Miami Herald / Twitter

EVERGLADES--This was President Obama's first trip to the Everglades. In a speech that lasted about 15 minutes, the president reiterated his administration's stance on preserving fresh water and reducing carbon emissions.

Seemingly in response to Florida Gov. Rick Scott's purported ban on the phrase "climate change," the president said, "(climate change) can't be edited out." Gov. Scott has denied any such ban exists.

Disputing reports that state agencies are prohibited from using the words "climate change," top environmental official Jonathan Steverson repeatedly uttered the phrase during a confirmation hearing Wednesday.

Steverson, who was appointed in December by Gov. Rick Scott as secretary of Florida Department of Environmental Protection, told the Senate Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee his agency has no policy against "climate change."

Greenpeace USA/flickr

A study on the effects of climate change forecasts the widespread bleaching of coral reefs sooner than expected. Corals in the Dry Tortugas are among those at risk. 

Any change in normal conditions, like unusually warm water, can cause corals to release algae from their tissues. These algae give corals their color and provide their primary source of food.

Kenny Malone

One way Miami Beach might prepare for the threat of rising sea levels is to elevate the whole city.

“The only tried and true solution to combating rising sea levels is to raise with it,” says Eric Carpenter, public works director for the City of Miami Beach.

As the city celebrates its centennial, the top-level engineer and Miami Beach resident spoke with WLRN about how sea-level rise will affect the city’s next 100 years.