climate change

Courtesy of Netflix

A new documentary came out on Netflix last week. It’s called "Chasing Coral," and it looks at the impact of coral bleaching on reefs.

Gustavo Rodriguez

In certain circles, people from the Netherlands inevitably get asked about sea level rise.

It's because for hundreds of years the country has had to keep out seawater and prevent flooding from its numerous rivers.

A massive iceberg the size of Delaware has broken free from Antarctica and is floating in the sea.

Earlier Wednesday, scientists announced that the 6,000-square-kilometer (about 2,300 square miles) iceberg had come loose, after satellites detected it had calved off the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula.

Police used water cannons and pepper spray to try to push back protesters who threw bottles, bricks and stones on Thursday ahead of the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, according to The Associated Press.

Some demonstrators wearing black hoods broke a police vehicle's window.

According to new research, Central Florida will be one of the top destinations for residents displaced by sea level rise in the coming century.

The University of Georgia study is believed to be the first to examine how sea level rise will reshape the nation's population inland.

Windsor Johnson / NPR

Climate change is going to cause disproportionate economic harm to parts of the United States that are already pretty hot, according to a study published in the journal Science.

The study by scientists and economists from the Climate Impact Lab suggests rising temperatures could increase a national income gap.

Climate scientists agree that this century is getting much warmer and that such warming will likely bring economic pain to the U.S., but economists aren't sure how much. Now, a team of scientists and economists, writing in the upcoming issue of the journal Science, says it can at least tell which parts of the country are likely to suffer the most.

Senior Citizens Participate In Million Orchid Project

Jun 28, 2017
Isabella Cueto / WLRN News

Dozens of senior citizens braved the heat Tuesday to help plant 200-300 baby orchids in Cutler Bay. 

The planting was part of the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden's Million Orchid project, which is three years in the making.

Jason Downing, an orchid biologist at Fairchild and project leader, says the plants are part of a research project to monitor the effects of climate change on native plant species.

Kate Stein / WLRN

When it comes to water, South Florida has a lot in common with the Netherlands. Both regions are close to sea level and rely on canals, seawalls and pumps to prevent flooding. And both face an increasing threat from sea-level rise.

So it makes sense that Dutch officials and South Florida leaders exchange a lot of advice on resiliency.

Allison Light / WLRN

Leaders of local governments re-affirmed their commitment to reducing greenhouse gases, unanimously approving a historic environmental resolution Monday at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Miami Beach.

The 259 mayors in attendance voted in favor of a resolution titled "100% Renewable Energy in American Cities," agreeing to set a goal of powering their communities exclusively by wind, solar, geothermal and wave energy by the year 2035. 

This week on The Florida Roundup ...

After weeks of private negotiations, Senate Republicans unveiled their Better Care Reconciliation Act, their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. Florida has more at stake in this debate than any other state and South Florida alone has more than 600,000 people signed up for individual coverage through the ACA this year. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Commissioners in Miami-Dade County and the city of Key West have voted to endorse  the Paris Climate Accord, despite President Donald Trump withdrawing the U.S. from the international agreement to cut carbon emissions earlier this month.

127 degrees in California's Death Valley. 124 degrees in Ocotillo Wells in San Diego County. 119 in Phoenix.

Parts of the Southwest and West are suffering through a heat wave, which is bringing problems beyond sweat and bad hair. Here's what's happening:

1. Airplanes can't take off

Nearly 50 flights were cancelled in Phoenix on Tuesday, as NPR's two-way blog reported. In Las Vegas, some airlines changed flights to take off in the morning when it's cooler.

The claims are flying fast and furious around the proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. A version proposed by Republicans in the House of Representatives would replace it with the American Health Care Act.

Katie Lepri

Dr. Phillip Frost thinks it has become "heresy" to question the role of human factors in the changing climate.

"I don't question that [the climate] is changing. But what I also know for an absolute fact is that over centuries it has been changing all the time," said Frost during a wide-ranging interview with The Sunshine Economy in which he discussed business, his philanthropy and the science museum that now bears his and his wife's names.

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