climate change

Environment
7:31 am
Tue September 24, 2013

How Many Scientists Does It Take To Write A Climate Report?

An iceberg floats through the water in Ilulissat, Greenland, in July. Researchers are studying how climate change and melting glaciers will affect the rest of the world.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 10:53 am

Scientists and government representatives are meeting in Stockholm this week to produce the latest high-level review of climate change. It's thousands of pages of material, and if it's done right, it should harbor very few surprises.

That's because it's supposed to compile what scientists know — and what they don't — about climate change. And that's left some scientists to wonder whether these intensive reviews are still the best way to go.

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Why There's A Boom In Noah's Ark Construction In Miami And Around The World

A puppy (born on the ark site) runs to Carolina Peralta, Hidden Ark spokesperson. (Taken 3/12/13)

With almost exactly forty days and forty nights left in South Florida’s rainy season, now might be a good moment to consider the options.

Globally, four Noah’s Arks have been either completed or started in the last few years.

As of last March, one-tenth of a life-sized ark -- 150-feet worth -- sat just outside Hialeah, part of the $1.5 million Hidden Ark project. (An update on that later.)

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Climate Change
7:00 am
Thu September 19, 2013

What The Dutch Can Teach Us About Sea Level Rise

Credit Nickolay Lamm / StorageFront.com

American scientists and engineers have been comparing notes with Dutch counterparts over the problem they both have: how to protect their low lands from rising sea levels.

In the U.S., it’s treated as a new problem. But the Dutch stopped panicking about sea level rise about 800 years ago and began to address it systematically.

Dikes and levies are a big part of the plan. But the Netherlands has also learned to pick its fights, and even let the water win sometimes.

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Environment
6:00 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Getting Your Head Around Climate Change Through Music

"Year of the Reef" is the last of four movements in Carson Kievman's symphony "Biodiversity."
Credit Peter J. Maerz/WLRN

It’s often said that life influences art. And for composer Carson Kievman, life in low-lying South Florida led to a symphony about climate change.

Kievman was composer-in-residence for the Florida Philharmonic during the 1990s, and he now runs the SoBe Institute of the Arts in Miami Beach. But the idea for his symphony, titled “Biodiversity,” came from a scientist at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

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Climate Change
8:34 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

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Beaches
4:00 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Help Miami-Dade Find New Sources Of Sand

Sand near Collins Avenue and 55th Street in Miami Beach.
Credit Yahoo Images/Cejas.me

Miami-Dade County needs new sources of sand for its beaches.

The Army Corps of Engineers says Miami-Dade is running out of offshore supplies and the county is looking for new places to harvest sand.

The corps is holding public meetings every day this week starting in Miami Beach this evening. Meetings will be held in Palm Beach and Broward counties Tuesday and Thursday.  

The corps is already considering a couple of different places Miami-Dade can get more sand from such as upland sources and federal and state waters in Southeast Florida.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

Pedersen Glacier, 1917
Louis H. Pedersen climate.gov/National Snow and Ice Data Center

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 8:12 pm

The weather is one of those topics that is fairly easy for people to agree on. Climate, however, is something else.

Most of the scientists who study the Earth say our climate is changing and humans are part of what's making that happen. But to a lot of nonscientists it's still murky. This week, two of the nation's most venerable scientific institutions tried to explain it better.

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Sea level rise
6:30 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Documenting Evidence Of Climate Change

A damaged stretch of A1A
Credit Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

For South Florida, climate change isn't part of some vague future; it's a reality today.  South Florida has seen nine inches of of sea-level rise since the 1920s.

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The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Miami, Soon The American Atlantis?

A depiction of our area with a 5 ft. rise in sea level, which by some estimates could happen in 100-300 years.
Credit New York Times, http://nyti.ms/SktOCY

On The Florida Roundup, we focus on the impacts of sea-level rise on our very vulnerable region.   

Rolling Stone magazine says Miami - and much of South Florida - is doomed to drown.  You wouldn’t know it based on what you hear from state leaders.  While county and local officials say they are working on solutions, are they pursuing the right ones? 

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Why Handwringing About Sea Level Rise Won't Save Miami

Credit FL Center for Environmental Studies

Miami as the modern Atlantis has a strangely tragic and romantic appeal.

Officially founded in 1896 (though there were settlers for some 75 years before that), and if a Rolling Stone article due to hit newsstands on July 4 is correct, Miami and the rest of coastal South Florida is looking at a very succinct timeline of existence.

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Climate Change
10:14 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Obama Lays Out Broad Plan To Address Climate Change

The Capitol dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant, which provides power to buildings in the Capitol complex in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 2:45 pm

Update at 2:38 p.m. ET. Obama Lays Out Plan:

In an address at Georgetown University in Washington, President Obama laid out a sweeping new plan to address climate change.

As expected, Obama said his plan seeks to cap the carbon emissions of power plants.

Obama also said the Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to Texas, would only be approved by the State Department if it aligned with the "nation's interest."

That is if "this project does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution," Obama said.

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Climate Change
7:47 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Coastal Cities Prepare For The Rising Tide

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 5:02 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Today on the show, 50 years on from Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech and music from the front lines of Brazil. But first, in a major policy address on Tuesday, President Barack Obama will outline his administration's plan to curb our historic levels of carbon emissions. A video released yesterday outlined some of what to expect.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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Climate Change
10:31 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Watch South Beach Disappear Under Sea Level Rise In Hypnotic New GIFs

Ocean Drive on Miami Beach would be submerged under five feet of water.
Credit Nickolay Lamm / StorageFront.com

Current climate change and sea level rise models indicate a very grim -- and water-logged -- future for South Florida and Miami in particular. But new imagery from researcher/artist Nickolay Lamm paints an almost hypnotic picture of these proposed realties for American cities like Miami, Boston, Washington D.C., and New York.

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Environment
7:00 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Why Miami Can't Copy New York's Plan For Sea Level Rise

Will this be the new normal in South Beach?
Credit maxstrz / Flickr Creative Commons

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg made significant waves Tuesday when he announced a comprehensive $19.5 billion plan to gird the city against the threat of sea level rise.

The long-term plans include a series of levees and storm barriers to protect against waters that are expected to rise anywhere from 20 inches to more than six feet in the next century. 

The national flap about Bloomberg's proactive stance on coping with impending coastal inundation has led to a sort of "OK, that's what they're doing. What about the rest of you?" sentiment among the media.

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Broward County Mayor Leads Local Response To Sea Level Rise

Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs
Credit twitter.com/Kristin_Jacobs

Even before last year's coastal calamity caused by superstorm Sandy, Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs was trying to get everyone's attention about sea-level rise and it's impact on South Florida.

She's one of the founding members of the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, a multi-county effort to help local governments plan ahead. Jacobs is a longtime county commissioner serving a second one-year term as mayor, a largely ceremonial role.

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