climate change

Event page ‘No Fear, We’re Queer.’

Dr. Tim Hall is a Senior Research Scientist with NASA and adjunct professor at Columbia University.  He has been studying weather patterns and their correlations to climate change. Dr. Hall joined Sundial to talk about climate change affecting the intensity of hurricanes and his upcoming talk at the Coworking and Office Space for Innovators in Wynwood tonight at 6 p.m.

NASA

Thousands of scientists are working on research related to climate change and extreme weather.

Dr. Tim Hall is one of them. Dr. Hall is a Senior Research Scientist with NASA and adjunct professor at Columbia University. He has been studying weather patterns and their correlations to climate change. He says wind, flooding and rainfall can affect the intensity of a hurricane.

NASA scientists have begun to prove that hurricanes are getting worse. In the last year they have collected date on Hurricane Irma, Maria and Harvey.

There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows.

Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams.

Honeybees understand that "nothing" can be "something" that has numerical meaning, showing that they have a primitive grasp of the concept of zero.

That's according to a newly published study in Science, which shows that bees possess a mathematical ability once thought to exist only in dolphins, primates, birds and humans who are beyond the preschool years.

Claire Thornton

Just two days before the official start of hurricane season, Florida International University hosted the world premiere Wednesday of “BUILT TO LAST?,” a documentary that warns of risks to homes and other buildings in “the age of disaster.”

“When someone loses their home, it’s like they’ve lost everything,” said Aris Papadopoulos, of FIU’s Extreme Events Institute, whose book, “Resilience – The Ultimate Sustainability,” inspired the film.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Solar panels are not going to fix sea-level rise.

They're an energy source that does not release carbon into the atmosphere. So, switching to solar panels will limit the carbon in the Earth's atmosphere in the future. That could help prevent sea-level rise from getting worse.

But solar panels do not take out the carbon that’s already there — the carbon that's already begun to cause global warming and rising seas.

At a roundtable in Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson got that fact wrong.

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

In a Miami-Dade courtroom, Judge Spencer Eig heard arguments Thursday both for and against a controversial development planned on an environmentally rare Pine Rocklands habitat in South Miami-Dade, near Zoo Miami.

Floydphoto / Wikimedia Commons

Sea-level rise is going to cost Broward County -- and leaders don't know yet how they're going to pay.

A roundtable meeting in Davie on Thursday brought together more than 40 elected officials, city staff and business leaders from across Broward. Many expressed concern over a lack of funding for sea-level rise adaptation projects.

Ron Wallace, the city engineer for Parkland, said he's concerned about drainage in South Florida's current system, which moves water from west to east.

Grains are the bedrock of civilization. They led humans from hunting and gathering to city-building. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, the fruits of three grasses provide the world with 60 percent of its total food: corn, wheat and rice. Aside from energy-rich carbohydrates, grains feed us protein, zinc, iron and essential B vitamins.

But rice as we know it is at risk.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

If you thought sea-level rise was the greatest immediate threat to South Florida’s future, you may need to think again.

There’s growing concern that the perception of the sea-level rise threat by insurers, banks and investors might submerge South Florida before rising seas do.

The seas are rising, frequently flooding the streets even when no storms are on the horizon. But that hasn't stopped foreign investors from shelling out big dollars for Miami real estate. Many are in it for the relatively short-term investment, then they'll try to sell before climate change takes its toll, observers of the local market say.

AP

Researchers including the Union of Concerned Scientists have argued that climate change is exacerbating the strength of hurricanes

Yet not a single session at the 32nd Annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference, held this week in West Palm Beach, focused on climate change research as it relates to hurricanes. 

Kate Stein / WLRN

In one of Miami-Dade’s most flood-prone areas, county officials on Thursday night collected public input on what to do about water from storms and and rising seas.

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Miami Beach won't be elevating new roads anytime soon, after fierce opposition from residents who alternatively insisted their neighborhood didn't flood and therefore didn't need higher streets, or who worried higher streets would send floodwater into their homes.

Neighbors in the city's latest stop on its internationally lauded $500 million plan to pump, pipe and elevate itself away from rising seas fought back from what they say is an unnecessary project — one they say will ruin their property values.

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