climate change

Think "renewable energy" and the wind and sun come to mind, but someday it may be possible to add ocean energy to that list.

screenshots of C-SPAN videos

This week in Congress, the most significant rewriting of the U.S. tax code could take a big step toward becoming law. The U.S. House of Representatives may vote on a big package of tax changes as soon as Thursday. The decision would come less than two weeks after the initial legislation was introduced by House Republican leaders and only a week after the House Ways and Means Committee debated the bill, eventually passing it through on a party-line vote.

 

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Alister Doyle/Reuters

The official US delegation to the United Nations’ climate talks this year in Bonn, Germany, cuts a confusing profile.

It’s small and nearly invisible, delegates refuse to talk on the record and the team’s office door is often closed.

More than halfway through the two-week meeting, the only official US event has promoted fossil fuels as a solution to climate change, including a big push for so-called clean coal.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

The next steps for the $400 million bond issue approved by city of Miami voters on Tuesday include developing criteria for selecting livability projects, officials championing the bond say.

"The city will not be purchasing any bonds until projects are actually not only decided but underway," said Jane Gilbert, Miami's chief resilience officer, adding that "underway" means shovels in the ground.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

When Miami voters head to the polls on Tuesday, they're going to find this question:

Shall the City issue General Obligation Bonds in an aggregate principal amount not exceeding $400,000,000.00 with interest payable at or below the maximum rate allowed by law, payable from ad valorem taxes levied on all taxable property in the City, provided that the capital projects debt millage not exceed the current rate of 0.5935, to:

• Reduce Flooding Risks; Improve Stormwater Infrastructure;

Kate Stein / WLRN

Resiliency is more than dealing with sea level rise, and Hurricane Irma made that point clearly, South Florida officials said at a post-Irma summit on Monday.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Did you lose power for a week after Hurricane Irma? Are you frustrated with the king tide flooding on your street? Or maybe thoughts of climate change keep you up at night?

 

Caitie Switalski / WLRN News

A packed auditorium at Broward College Thursday heard from local experts about how climate change and sea-level rise will affect the future. 

Dr. Jennifer Jurado, Broward County's chief climate resilience officer,  and her Miami-Dade counterpart,  James Murley, gave a talk at the South Campus. 

Students like psychology major Aurora Trejos, 23, came to ask Jurado and Murley if the data is really as "doom and gloom" as it seems. 

NPR

A Florida State University study links declining bumble bee populations with climate change.

The researchers examined three bumble bee species in the Colorado Rocky Mountains and found warmer temperatures are affecting flowers, the animals’ food source.

Lead investigator Jane Ogilvie considers the findings a warning for other places like Florida, where she says the issue is not as well-studied.

“There could be subtle changes in how flowers are distributed in a place like Florida that could have these knock-on effects on pollinators.”

President Trump's pick for the next leader of NASA is a fighter pilot who wants Americans to return to the moon but doesn't believe that humans are causing climate change.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Climate change is a local issue.

When life gives you too much rain, make beer with it

Aug 22, 2017

We've all heard the expression, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” That's kind of what Joris Hoebe did.

His city, Amsterdam, has two problems.

First, the city loves beer and can’t seem to stop coming up with new brews.

Second, Amsterdam is 2 meters below sea level, so it floods easily. That means it has a problem with big rains.

Hoebe’s idea was to tackle the two challenges together.

A hobby brewer himself, Hoebe was working up some homebrew one evening when it started pouring outside.

All evidence points out to the fact that the earth is warming and the climate is changing. In Florida, that means more unpleasantly hot days, rising seas and stronger storms. 

So, it may be time to read up on the subject, if you haven’t already. Some concerned members of the community have taken up learning how to teach others about climate change science and solutions. 

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