climate change

Laura Coburn/WLRN

Dr. Harold Wanless researches climate change as chair of the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Miami in Coral Gables. He documents coastal erosion caused by hurricane damage – and the impact of sea-level rise.  

Wanless calls South Florida the poster child for climate change.

Florida International University

Floridians have been finding ways to get above high water for thousands of years, going back to the “tree islands” that helped Seminole and Calusa tribes stay dry in the Everglades. But rising seas could soon force wholesale changes in the way our cities and towns operate. At Florida International University, this reality has prompted an inter-disciplinary architecture studio where students are experimenting with designs for climate change.

 

Millions of years of Florida's history are lying on a table in Paulette McFadden's office at the University of Florida in Gainesville. It's in long metal tubes containing several feet of sediment from Horseshoe Beach, a community on Florida's Gulf coast.

"This core," McFadden says, "actually spans about 30 million years."

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

The Republican presidential candidates gathered at the University of Miami for its last debate before the Florida primary on Tuesday.

U.S.-CUBA RELATIONS

America’s changing relationship with Cuba was part of the discussion at last night’s Republican primary debate.

Donald Trump said he doesn’t agree entirely with President Barack Obama’s diplomatic openings with Cuba, but something needs to change.

“After 50 years, it’s enough time, folks," said Trump. But we have to make a good deal.”

Washington Post

Two presidential debates are coming to Miami this week.

Republican candidates will debate at the University of Miami Thursday night. But first, Democrats will take the stage Wednesday night at the Kendall campus of Miami Dade College.

Twenty-one mayors – most of them from South Florida – sent a letter to the moderators for both debates. The mayors want the candidates to explain how they plan to deal with climate change and sea level rise.

Florida's Coral Getting Help From Hundreds Of Miles Away

Mar 4, 2016
James St. John / Wikimedia Commons

Some coral in the Florida Keys are breeding with coral 1,000 miles away more than they are with coral on the very same reef, according to a new study from the University of Miami.

Valters Boze/flickr

A climate change litmus test has been circulating around Tallahassee. The man behind the test wants to get lawmakers and other state leaders on the record about their feelings regarding climate change and the risk to Florida.

Linnette Vasquez/flickr

It's a Valentine’s Day edition of the Florida Roundup featuring husband-and-wife media teams.

The Florida legislative session is at its midpoint. The death penalty remains on the agenda. The House and Senate are split over whether juries should agree unanimously in capital punishment cases.

Noel López / Ocean Doctor

David Guggenheim fell in love with scuba diving and coral reefs in the 1970s when he attended a marine science camp in the Florida Keys. But over a career as a scientist and conservationist, he watched those coral reefs degrade and disappear.

President Obama is telling global leaders that the U.S. is taking the lead on combating climate change. But Congress would have to approve any money for the effort and Republicans are dead set against it. South Florida Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart says the president knows he's deceiving world leaders.

“This is a president who seems to be, every day, more and more out of touch with the reality of the world. And so, you know, would it surprise me if the president went and promised things he couldn’t deliver? It wouldn’t surprise me,” Diaz-Balart says.

Middle and high school students at the Mock-UN Summit.
Frost Museum of Science

  Dozens of middle and high school students from Miami-Dade County participated in a mock United Nations event over the weekend at the Frost Museum of Science.

 

The event coincided with climate change negotiations in Paris.

 

At the beginning of the day-long workshop held on Saturday, the students were given a presentation of the scientific aspects of climate change issues around the world, with a focus on its effects in South Florida. Some of the issues that were discussed were sea-level rise and extreme weather.  

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

South Florida leaders attended the annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in Key West this week to come up with real solutions for combatting the effects of climate change, like sea-level rise.

“For the short-term there is a dramatic need to come to agreement with regards to some of the infrastructure standards,” said Jennifer Jurado, the director of Broward County Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

The story that Gov. Rick Scott's administration had banned the term "climate change" from state documents fueled national ridicule and environmentalist ire.

But ridiculing Republicans is no way to bring them on board to address the impacts of climate change, says one of South Florida's elected leaders.

The composer John Luther Adams calls himself "deeply, deeply Alaskan." That's where the 62-year-old lived almost his entire adult life, and he still has his cabin in the woods where he's written so much of his music. But now he and his wife split their time between an apartment in New York City and a house in Mexico right next to the Pacific Ocean.

City of Key West

  While international leaders gather in Paris to look for global approaches to climate change, South Florida's leaders gathered in Key West. They are already immersed in dealing with the issue. Sometimes literally.

"When there is coastal flooding as a result of king tides, such as what we had a couple weeks ago, I can tell you I was up to my knees in the communities in my district," said Palm Beach County Commissioner Steven Abrams. "Local government is the first responder to the impacts of climate change."

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