Census Bureau

After an outcry from advisers to the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal agency is no longer considering a proposal to remove a question about sexual orientation from a marketing survey for the 2020 Census.

In the 1970s, the nation's Latino advocacy groups had grown fed up with the U.S. Census Bureau. During its 1970 population count, the agency had made a half-hearted attempt to quantify the number of Latinos and Hispanics living in the United States.

America's diversity remains on the rise, with all racial and ethnic minorities growing faster than whites from 2015 to 2016, the U.S. Census Bureau says in a new snapshot of the national population. The agency also found the U.S. median age has risen to nearly 38.

Asian and mixed-race people are the two fastest-growing segments of the U.S. population, the U.S. Census Bureau says. Both groups grew by 3 percent from July 2015 to July 2016. In the same 12 months, the non-Hispanic white population grew by just 5,000 people.

The U.S. Census Bureau has never asked Americans about sexual orientation and gender identity. Last year, though, requests for that data came from more than 75 members of Congress and multiple federal agencies.

Still, the Census Bureau concluded "there was no federal data need" to collect this information, the bureau's outgoing director, John Thompson, wrote in March.

The U.S. Census Bureau published a list on Tuesday of more than 50 planned topics of questions for the 2020 Census and the American Community Survey.

Florida is the second-fastest growing state, taking a back seat to only Texas in the number of newcomers, according to the latest report from the U.S. Census Bureau.

More Americans are making more money.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new numbers on Tuesday showing that, after a brutal economic recession and years of stagnation, real median household incomes rose from $53,718 in 2014 to $56,516 last year. That's a 5.2 percent rise — the first statistically significant increase since 2007.

But, as NPR's Pam Fessler notes, "the median household income was still lower than it was in 2007."

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The newest data from the U.S. Census shows Florida's population grew by almost a million and a half between 2010 and 2015. And, more than half of those new residents are Hispanic.

Census: 128 Languages Spoken In South Florida Homes

Nov 3, 2015
U.S. Census Bureau

 

At least 350 languages were spoken in U.S. households between 2009 and 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday.

It is one of the most comprehensive data ever collected by the Census' American Community Survey. ACS previously had only 39 language groups available to classify its data annually.

 

In the Miami metropolitan area – Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties – 128 languages are spoken at home.

 

Median household income in Florida has returned to the same range as it was before the recession.

New figures released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau show the median household income last year was almost $47,500.

Alexia Fodere / El Nuevo Herald

The U.S. Census Bureau considers Hispanics an ethnic group only and not a racial group. But a growing number of Hispanics have urged the census to allow them to be defined as both - and a new survey out today gives them more ammunition.

The Pew Research Center in Washington D.C. has released a new report called “Multiracial in America.” As part of the study it examined how U.S. Hispanics view themselves in terms of race.