books

Flying Under The Radar With Six Hip South Florida Writers

Apr 17, 2013
Wikimedia Commons

Last month, we introduced you to nine acclaimed authors who call South Florida their home, at least part-time. But that was just a small sampling. South Florida boats a tribe of critically acclaimed scribes living anywhere from the Florida Keys to Palm Beach County. Below are seven folks who are building on the tradition of hometown heroes like Dave Barry and Carl Hiaasen (who actually now lives just a little bit further north in Vero Beach.)

http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3ohfi4/

Behind the allure of bikinis and board shorts, Miami residents possess a sea of Star Trek costumes.

At least that's one conclusion you might draw from a recent article in Movodo, a real estate website.  The criteria used to determine the winners, while not scientific, is telling of the "nerd demographic" that our city has nurtured over the years.  Here is a quick rundown of the data used to determine the winners:

www.chipkidd.com

04/09/13 - Literary contributor Ariel Gonzalez with noted book jacket designer Chip Kidd.  Many DO judge a book by its cover. Mr. Kidd's book is "Go: A Kidd's Guide to Graphic Design."

Nathaniel Sandler

Going to an antiquarian book fair with a university’s special collections librarian is similar to walking around Central Park with a leaky bag of bread crumbs. Or if you prefer a local metaphor, like a chum brick floating in Government Cut, with sharks coming for miles bumping their noses against the boat to test the edibility of the situation. Watching the dealers shout down a respected and well-known book buyer is a sight to be seen.

Book Your Calendars For Booklegger's 'Library On The Run'

Jan 23, 2013
sushiesque / Flickr

Miami Beach is going literary, literally.

Thursday, local book enthusiasts can sit around, handcrafted cocktail in hand, and talk literature. Better yet, they can leave with a free book.

The event is put on by Bookleggers, a community mobile library often referred to as “a library on the run.”

A young boy seeks justice. A young woman wants to stay alive. A friendship is tested. The child of a commune comes of age. A solitary man gives himself over to love. These are the bare actions underpinning the novels that I'm suggesting for book clubs this year. Some are first novels; others the work of well-known writers. Some might touch your heart; others might challenge the way you think. At least one will make you laugh — and a couple might make you cry. They are all good reads. And they are, above all, books you'll want to talk about with your friends.

Nina Subin

The latest book by  Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her, is a collection of stories linked by recurring characters. Last month, it was nominated for a National Book Award. Less than two weeks later, Diaz won a coveted MacArthur "genius" grant (half-a-million dollars over five years). He also teaches writing at MIT.

Jacket design: Lynn Buckley / Random House, Inc.

Kurt Vonnegut fans have a lot to look forward to over the next couple of weekends. First, a performance of a chamber music piece with a libretto by the iconoclastic author, and then a discussion of a new book of his letters at the Miami Book Fair International.

Books & Books Celebrates 30 Years

Nov 1, 2012
Books & Books


It's been 30 years since the independent bookstore, Books & Books, first opened its doors in Coral Gables, and this week, they're celebrating.
 

Today there are stores throughout the region and beyond. There are three South Florida stores, as well as outposts at the Miami International Airport and the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale,  and stores in Grand Cayman and Westhampton Beach, New York, too.

Tom Wolfe wrote his new novel, Back to Blood, entirely by hand. But the author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities also says that wasn't entirely by choice — he'd rather have used a typewriter.

"Unfortunately, you can't keep typewriters going today — you have to take the ribbons back to be re-inked," Wolfe tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "There's a horrible search to try to find missing parts."

Excerpt: Tom Wolfe and Art Basel on Miami Beach

Oct 15, 2012

Can you feel that change in the air?  Never mind the fact that the seasons in Miami are mostly a social construct, the art season is upon us.

While we remain hopeful for a significant temperature drop in mid-October, novelist Tom Wolfe is forecasted to drop his latest work Back to Blood on October 23rd.  Set in Miami, the novel explores the multi-ethnic urban jungle of South Florida - and all the perceived class struggles that entails.

Diana Abu-Jaber On Sharing The Table During The Holidays

Dec 14, 2011
Diana Abu-Jaber

For many of us, cooking for a holiday feast or making preparations for a party are well worn and beloved holiday routines.  All of that hosting can also be exhausting!  Listen to author Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay on her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.

An Excerpt From The Hatmakers And The Heron Master

Oct 19, 2011
Trina Sargalski

Michael Keller is the author of a graphic novel adaptation of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. He is working on a historical novel, The Hatmakers and the Heron Master, about hat-makers, wading birds and Florida’s early settlement. Below is an excerpt from his latest book:

1893.

Confessions Of A Refugee Boy

Apr 7, 2011
Simon & Schuster

Learning to Die in Miami is author Carlos Eire’s follow-up to his 2003 memoir, Waiting for Snow in Havana. In his first book, Eire wrote about his childhood in Cuba before and during the Castro revolution.

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