books

A prominent Christian conservative says it’s time for Christians to withdraw from modern, secular American life.

5-8-2017 We’ve passed the seventh anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil explosion, in 2010.  A spill impacted 68,000 miles of ocean, and washed ashore along the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas and Florida.

We speak with Connie May Fowler about her memoir of the event, called “A Million Fragile Bones.”

James Patterson has a long history of collaboration. Of his dozens of books, the blockbuster thriller writer has written at least 50 — yes, five-zero — with the name of a co-author emblazoned on the cover.

Still, it's fair to say none of them has the resume of the fiction novice he's teaming up with now: former President Bill Clinton.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads.

Happy reading!

Teresa Frontado, WLRN digital editor:

I am reading Bad Feminist, a collection of essays by Roxane Gay.

Ivanka Trump's Women Who Work is the latest entry in the crowded "having-it-all" genre — the ocean of books aimed at helping women navigate their careers.

This month marks 350 years since John Milton sold his publisher the copyright of Paradise Lost for the sum of five pounds.

His great work dramatizes the oldest story in the Bible, whose principal characters we know only too well: God, Adam, Eve, Satan in the form of a talking snake — and an apple.

Except, of course, that Genesis never names the apple but simply refers to "the fruit." To quote from the King James Bible:

"Marcus Gavius Apicius purchased me on a day hot enough to fry sausage on the market stones."

So begins the tale of Thrasius, the fictional narrator of Feast of Sorrow. Released this week, the novel is based on the real life of ancient Roman noble Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is thought to have inspired and contributed to the world's oldest surviving cookbook, a ten-volume collection titled Apicius.

Courtesy of Doug Mack

One century ago — on March 31, 1917 — on the Caribbean islands of Saint Thomas and Saint Croix, Danish flags were lowered and the Stars and Stripes were raised. The U.S. had bought three of the Virgin Islands and they eventually became a territory. But what does it mean to be part of America — but not one of the 50 states?

Carrie Fisher passed away this week and she's obviously going to be remembered for her role as Princess Leia. But she has been in a lot of movies. 

Even after the Electoral College officially made Donald Trump our next president, a lot of Americans are still wondering how it happened. In part, working-class anger is said to have fueled Trump's victory; and to understand where that anger is coming from, some people are turning to books.

Pixabay

Whether you're into romance or science fiction, biographies or memoirs,  publishers know the summer is a big time for people to dive deep into a good story. Miami Herald book critic Connie Ogle  has her reading list and recommendation to enjoy during the next weeks.

Courtesy of VONA

The Voices of Our Nation Arts foundation workshop kicked off this week at the University of Miami.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Judy Blume's latest book, “In the Unlikely Event,” came out in paperback this week. So we're bringing back this hour, which we produced when the book first came out last year. 

Nalani Anderko

 “Dear Books and Books,” the letter starts in blue pen on a torn out piece of graph paper with the fringe still on it.

What follows is the most sincere apology for an act of teenage rebellion one could imagine.

A few weeks ago a girl dropped off an envelope in person to the Lincoln Road location of Books and Books. Inside, Nalani Anderko, the store’s manager, found this apology for stealing a copy of Agatha Christie’s book “Third Girl” back in the summer of 2014.

Carol Tedesco

  There are a lot of mystery books set in Key West. And now there's a new addition to the list: Killer Takeout, the seventh installment in the Key West Food Critic Mysteries.

The series is by Lucy Burdette, pen name for Key West resident Roberta Isleib. She recently spoke with WLRN's Nancy Klingener about the new book and about the series.

What are the Key West Food Critic Mysteries?

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