black Miami

The Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust held a daylong summit in downtown Miami to talk about the needs of Miami’s black communities.

Some of the topics discussed were housing strategies and equal participation of black business owners in development projects.

Here's what some of the attendees had to say:

T. Willard Fair, president of the Urban League of Greater Miami:  Black politicians in Miami-Dade have done "zero" to build black wealth in black neighborhoods.

Ginny Gutierrez / Courtesy

The American Black Film Fest has announced its return to Miami Beach for its 20th anniversary next year. 

Originally envisioned as a destination event, founder Jeff Friday says the festival may be ready to settle down here.

Friday cited Miami’s “culture, logistics, and accessibility” as fitting the needs of the festival’s community, and as the main reason for his decision to choose the city as a permanent home.

State Archives of Florida

Thirty-five years ago, Miami's Liberty City was smoldering -- flames leapt from the shells of cars while people looted businesses.

Eighteen people died, and more than $100 million worth of property was destroyed.

The McDuffie Riots were more violent than what happened in Baltimore and Ferguson, but there are lots of similarities.

Overtown's Last Shoe Repair Man Closes Shop

May 7, 2015
Walt Michot / Miami Herald

Bereatha Howard is having a crisis of the sole.

The left half of her treasured pair of black Calvin Kleins has ripped apart at the seams. And so she she is doing what so many in Overtown have done for so many years: walking down Third Avenue, her shoes in a white plastic bag, to find Lovell Singletary.

“These are my favorite shoes,” she says, handing the bag to a man sitting outside next to a plastic children’s table, wearing a tattered green cap sideways like a beret. “Do you think you can fix it?”



There’s an interesting juxtaposition happening in South Florida during the last week of Black History Month.

Nadege Green / WLRN

In the city of Opa-locka, a colorful park stands where liquor bottles and trash once collected in an empty lot.

New and chic affordable housing is popping up. Bright murals decorate buildings downtown.

Three years into a citywide arts transformation, Opa-locka is challenging how outsiders perceive the north Miami-Dade enclave, once better known for its prolific drug trade and gun violence.

Much of this transformation involves collaborations with artists. Artists and their ideas infused are in affordable housing development, urban planning and landscaping.

John Walther / Miami Herald staff

Much has been written about the close bonds forged between Jews and African-Americans in Miami in the 1950s at the start of the civil rights movement.  But a more complex, conflicted side of that relationship has fired the imagination of local novelist Joan Lipinsky Cochran.  

Nadege Green / WLRN

Tenants who live in a Liberty City apartment building with leaky ceilings, moldy walls and toilets that don’t flush protested Friday morning to get the attention of Miami Commissioner Keon Hardemon.

They live at 6040 NW 12th Ave., a building city officials and tenants say is owned by a slumlord.

The protesters showed up at Miami City Hall to demand an apology from Hardemon, who represents Liberty City, for this statement he made to WLRN about their building’s living conditions:

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Right now, there's a national discussion happening around race and how police treat black men. 

But what happens to that conversation when you pair being a black man with also being a police officer?

Miami Major Delrish Moss talks about his experiences — from being a high school student who cleaned floors at the Biscayne Federal Bank to now being a Miami Police Department officer.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

  On Thursday night in  Overtown, artist Doba Afolabi was showing his work at the Art Africa show.

Afolabi is from Nigeria. He used to live in Miami, but left for Brooklyn a while ago.

Up close, his paintings look like abstracts in brightly-colored oil paint. But stand a few feet back, and a cellist in a top hat emerges. Or two saxophone players against a fiery background. One painting is called “Ride the Storm.” That’s the piece he did after his house burned down. Painting, he says, is what keeps him happy and centered.