Arts

Art Basel
11:29 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Excerpt: Tom Wolfe and Art Basel on Miami Beach

Can you feel that change in the air?  Never mind the fact that the seasons in Miami are mostly a social construct, the art season is upon us.

While we remain hopeful for a significant temperature drop in mid-October, novelist Tom Wolfe is forecasted to drop his latest work Back to Blood on October 23rd.  Set in Miami, the novel explores the multi-ethnic urban jungle of South Florida - and all the perceived class struggles that entails.

Read more
Arts
4:48 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

The Nine Best Blocks In South Florida

Photo of Allapattah submitted by Albert Harum-Alvarez.
Credit Albert Harum-Alvarez

For the first time since the 1920’s, young people across the United States are migrating back to the urban cores, and leaving the suburbs behind, according to U.S. Census data.

Read more
Local Documentaries
1:14 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Tom Wolfe Documentary Premieres In Miami

Tom Wolfe spent six years researching his latest novel.
Medusahead

Tom Wolfe’s latest novel, Back to Blood, takes place in Miami. It won’t be out until later in the month, but a new documentary about the years Wolfe spent here researching the book premieres Tuesday, October 9 at O Cinema in Wynwood.

Read more
Arts
10:20 am
Thu October 4, 2012

Coconut Grove Playhouse Set For State Takeover

The Coconut Grove Playhouse has been closed since 2006.
ImageMD flickriver.com

The nonprofit board of the Coconut Grove Playhouse has decided not to try to block the state from coming in and taking back the historic 1926 theater. 

That means the state could be in charge of the facility by next week. 

The theater has been closed for six years because of financial problems and there are still unresolved claims against it.

However, Miami-Dade County has set aside $20 million designated for the theater and there is a strong possibility the Playhouse could be deeded to the county by the state.

Read more
Arts
7:40 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Bacardi Buildings To Become New Arts Headquarters

Bacardi Tower.

The iconic Bacardi Tower and Museum located north of downtown Miami has been sold.

And in keeping with its artistic exterior, its interior will serve as a new home to the arts.

National YoungArts, Foundation,  created by Ted and Lin Arison in 1981, will set up shop in the blue-and-white-tiled building, which was designated historic in 2009.

The tower and the nearby smaller stained-glass building complex will be revamped in part by Frank Gehry, who designed the New World Symphony's home on Miami Beach.

The purchase price is $10 million.

Read more
Linda Villella Leaves The School She Founded
9:05 am
Fri August 31, 2012

What Edward Villella's Wife Will Always Carry With Her

These days, Miami City Ballet and its school have slick, professional brochures and world-renowned performers. Linda Villella started the Miami City Ballet School because she wanted a convenient place for her daughter to dance.
Miami City Ballet

An era is ending at Miami City Ballet. In addition to the resignation of its founding director Edward Villella, his wife Linda is stepping down from her post at the helm of Miami City Ballet School on August 31st. 

A former professional ice skater, she never intended to immerse herself in the ballet world and follow her husband’s artistic pursuits. The idea sprung from her desire to create a ballet school for her daughter, Crista. She wanted a ballet school closer to her husband's Miami Beach company. 

Read more
Arts
12:00 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Music, Theater Now Parked at Delray Beach 'Arts Garage'

An evening at the Arts Garage.
Arts Garage

On any given weekend, you might walk by The Old School Square parking garage in Delray Beach and hear the sounds of jazz or blues or classical music wafting from the ground floor.

It’s an innovative venue known as the 'Arts Garage' and, yes, the rest of the building is actually devoted to cradling cars.

But the ground floor is where all the action is.

No vehicles there, no take-a-ticket machines, no yellow lines, no parking attendants to be seen, mostly live music in a 5500 square foot garage.

Read more
Arts
6:36 am
Fri July 13, 2012

A Midsummer Night's Disco Comes To Miami

A scene from "The Donkey Show" at the Adrienne Arsht Center
Christine DiMattei

The disco craze that took the world by storm nearly 40 years ago was born in New York City, right?

Maybe not.

A theatrical experience celebrating 1970's disco comes to the Adrienne Arsht Center tonight.  And while it’s hundreds of miles away from the streets John Travolta struts down in “Saturday Night Fever,” it turns out Miami played a major role in the disco craze.

Read more
Arts
11:09 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

The Cuban Sandwich War Is Over, Miami Concedes Defeat

This looks seriously delicious. The question is: Where was it made, Miami or Tampa?

After an incursion by the upstart Miami Cuban community, the people have spoken – Tampa is the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

More than 7,200 people voted at the NPR food blog, “The Salt,” and the results speak for themselves: 57 percent for Tampa, 43 percent for Miami as the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

Read more
Civil Rights And Arts
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students. She lives in
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Read more
Civil Rights And Arts
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students. She lives in
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Read more
Arts And Civil Rights
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students.
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Read more
Environmental Art
4:58 pm
Tue March 27, 2012

How Dozens Of Tires Went From Being At The Bottom Of The Ocean To The Center Of An Art Show

Crew removes tires from the water.
Patricia Sagastume

The whitewall rubber tires, which until recently had been on the bottom of the ocean floor off the coast of Broward County, now look like deflated, salt-encrusted life preservers, and reek of the decayed smell of barnacles mixed with sea spray.

They are the stars of an art exhibit called “The Eclipse,” open now in Miami’s Wynwood district, a tribute to a failed plan to create an artificial reef and mankind’s attempts to remove the tires and save the ocean from even more destruction.

Read more
Arts
7:05 am
Mon February 27, 2012

'Flower Bombing' Is Growing Art

'Flower Bombing' has no blooms.
Kenny Malone

By day, Arlene Delgado is an ad designer who deals with things like web design, branding and logos.

But when the sun goes down, she sometimes turns into somewhat of an ad avenger.

The Miami native says she's been aware of ads around her all her life from the usual suspects - billboards, banners, murals, and bus stops.

But she wanted to turn the tables a bit by with words that aren't so commercial.

She points and then reads out loud one of her creations, inspired by a Tarot card.

'Judge fairly, speak truth and never waiver from your standards.'

Read more
Arts
12:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

Alvin Ailey Dance Director Comes Home To Miami

Robert Battle comes home to Miami
Carl Juste Miami Herald

On an icy night in late December, Miami native Robert Battle, the new artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, saw his past and future come together in the heart of New York City.

After a year and a half of public grooming, of working alongside his towering predecessor, Judith Jamison, Battle was finally at the head of modern dance's most famous company, and in programming the troupe's annual five-week season at City Center Theatre, a major event in the New York dance world, he had made his real debut as director.

Read more

Pages