art basel

Tom Hudson

If you walk through the right breezeway on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach and into a small courtyard, you’ll see on your right a spiral concrete staircase. It’s painted pink. You can’t miss it. It leads to a single doorway. Inside is about 2,000 square feet split into four rooms. This is home the Gavlak Gallery.

Sarah Gavlak began her gallery in 2005 and was chosen to show works at the next Art Basel (2006) in a shipping container on the beach. She has been back every year since, including the fair that wrapped up this past Sunday.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Buffing is what it’s called when you paint over someone else's work, erasing it. The Buff Daddy has been doing this for decades and he’s the guy people won’t see as they flock to Wynwood this Miami Art Week to see the new street art that’s going up on the walls of stores and warehouses.

Neil Case

When you sit in the passenger seat of DJ Billy E’s sky-blue van and he turns a few nobs on the console, tens of thousands of watts of bass are pushed out from a wall of subwoofers behind your head and crash down, not just on your ears, but on your entire body. It makes every little nose hair dance around and tickle. It’s hard to breathe there’s so much pressure. It is absolutely thrilling.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

 

The sheet music for Symphony No. I-95 includes musical notations like ‘wipers on’ and ‘sustained honk.’

It’s a live performance that remakes traffic noises — beeps, honks, engines revving — into an organized orchestral production with cars.   

This is what artist and musician Steve Parker calls an "automobile choir."

The composer John Luther Adams calls himself "deeply, deeply Alaskan." That's where the 62-year-old lived almost his entire adult life, and he still has his cabin in the woods where he's written so much of his music. But now he and his wife split their time between an apartment in New York City and a house in Mexico right next to the Pacific Ocean.

Alicia Zuckerman

A lawmaker from the city that hosts Art Basel Miami Beach says a tax break on art work would help stimulate the economy statewide. 

State representative David Richardson of Miami Beach just filed a bill that would exempt works of art from the state's sales tax. 

To qualify, the artwork would have to be original, as well as signed and sold by the artists. It would have to cost at least $1,000.

Richardson says said the measure is important because artwork in Florida is under a double-taxation:

Florida Roundup: Art Week In Miami

Dec 5, 2014
Terence Shepherd / Instagram / WLRN

On the Florida Roundup, we discuss the week's news with local journalists. 

Gay Marriage And Miami-Dade Human Rights Ordinance

Wynwood Pop-Up Exhibits Student-Shot Everyday Portraits

Dec 3, 2014
Gregory Castillo / WLRN

    

On a warm afternoon in Wynwood, just minutes away from their homes in Allapattah and Overtown, a group of students is making images. 

The group, 25 students selected by the Play to Win Foundation, is part of the program's Through My Lens: Art Is Life workshop. The mission is to empower students through art. 

Students paired with mentors spent all day on Nov. 8 crafting their photography skills. Armed with state-of-the-art Nokia phones, they snapped photos of each other in front of murals. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Amidst all the new and cutting-edge art on display at Art Basel and surrounding fairs, an exhibition of late painter Purvis Young’s work is a well-deserved resurrection.

“A Man Amongst the People: A Purvis Homecoming” is the first art show in the newly renovated Historic Lyric Theater in Overtown. The exhibition represents a homecoming for work made by the former Overtown resident.

www.facebook.com/CenterForGreatApes

11/27/14 - Next time on South Florida Arts Beat, Judith Bishop speaks with Bob Goodman about the artistic tidal wave that is Art Basel/Miami Beach. Patti Ragan describes her non-profit Center For Great Apes and its fundraiser in Wynwood next week. Bob Weinberg reviews Iko Iko’s new CD, “Bullets In The Bonfire, Vol.

Miami River Art Fair

If you want to dip a timid toe in the sexy international art scene without getting sucked into the whirlpool Art Basel creates, the solution is right here in river city.

The Miami River Art Fair is in its third year and beginning to make a splash. Organizers must have been thinking big when they dubbed their Art Basel satellite location “the Manhattan of Miami”. The hubris is understandable: see the resemblance in the photo - big buildings with pretty lights on the water? Symbolism. Perspective. 

Image Courtesy of Jenny Romney / IPC Visual Lab

For over 25 years, Carl Juste has frozen time.   

With the shutter of his lens, the veteran Miami Herald photojournalist has documented the days and lives of those who live in and around South Florida. But now, Juste is changing things, putting the cameras in the hands of a new generation and showing them how visual stories are told.

A group 10 advanced photojournalism students will show off 10 weeks' worth of work, illustrating the vibrant colors that make up life in South Florida.