Diego Orlandini

Street art is by nature ephemeral. But a coloring book, of all things, is preserving some of the murals in Wynwood by asking the rest of us to add our own interpretations of the work with crayon, pencil or marker.

The pages are black and white versions of murals - both abstract and figurative. Some of the pages feature an entire mural,  others just a detailed section of a wall.

The coloring book’s creator, Diego Orlandini, said the first mention of a coloring book came from an ex-girlfriend.

A Haitian-American teenager who convinces her teacher to have a “home exchange” program is at the center of a new Disney Channel short film called “Exchange.”

Disney Channel rolled out 12 short films this month that can be streamed on YouTube and Disney platforms.

Haitian-Jamaican actress, writer and producer  Daheli Hall  created "Exchange," and it’s a film that will definitely resonate in South Florida--which probably shouldn't be a surprise since Hall is a Miami native.

Wilson Sayre

Art and social justice. For centuries artists have been combining the two and a show opening Friday in Miami once again hopes to harness this form of human creativity to get people to talk about human rights.

One piece at the show at Art Bastion Gallery in Wynwood features two panels full of rubber duckies: one yellow, the other blue. But, there’s an exception. One duckie from each color have been switched.

  And those two duckies “stick out like a sore thumb,” says Courtney Levine, a volunteer with Amnesty International.

In the 17th century, Artemisia Gentileschi broke the glass ceiling. 

She was "one of the most remarkable women in the history of western art," says Richard Savino, a professor at Sacramento State University and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.

Born in Rome in 1593, she led an epic and often tragic life during an age when the city was trying to become the liveliest in Europe, says Savino, also a musician, who has recorded songs from Gentileschi's time. 

Savannah Koval / Monroe County Public Information

Propane tanks once used for home heating have found new life in the Florida Keys, as art and resting places.

California artist Colin Selig made a bench and loveseat from the old tanks. The new pieces were recently installed at the Monroe County Courthouse in Marathon.

  The county sets aside 1 percent of the budget for art from all major new construction and renovation projects (except for sewage treatment plants). The budget for the new benches was $14,200.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

What happens when you get a group of WLRN listeners together to ride public transit and experience art? They arrive early to an 8 a.m. event.

We rode around the Omni Loop of the Metromover to experience Ivan Depeña's new art project "The Sounds," which uses the tram to whisk you through a growing sound composition that builds to a crescendo at Museum Park Station.

Read more about the project here.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

A new public art project in downtown Miami is piping music into the Metromover. It’s not coming over the loud speaker, but through a new app that’s designed to let people uncover hidden art in the world.

Get on the Metromover at Government Center Station, open an app called “Lapse,” put on some headphones and as you slowly make your way around the circuit, a symphony slowly builds to a rich and textured audio composition. “The Sounds” is one part of Ivan Depeña’s goal to mix art, virtual reality and a twinge of  science fiction.

Carol Tedesco / Key West Art & Historical Society

  On Michael Gieda's first day at work with the Key West Art & Historical Society, he checked out one of the society's three museums, Fort East Martello.

There he found a couple of local artists working on some pieces that had been in the society's collection for almost 30 years.

  "I remember walking up to the second floor of the citadel where all these pieces were being treated and just being utterly and completely blown away by this collection of sculpture," Gieda said.

Courtesy of the artist

In a studio above a pizza place in Miami’s Design District, a film projects onto a screen. Scenes of life flicker past. The graininess and clothing style give away the time - late 1960s. But, the activities are familiar today: eating burgers, playing music with friends, taking a walk in the woods. For a brief moment a page with typewriter script flashes the name “Walden” on the screen.

This is Jonas Mekas’ seminal avant-garde film from 1969.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Lineth Mardomingo, a third-grader at Coral Terrace Elementary School, calls her latest piece of art, "Spinny Scroll." The piece is inspired by a memory: the time she dropped a crayon on the floor and saw it spinning, then kept spinning it and spinning it and then started spinning herself, and then bumped into a wooden bed.

"That was a long time ago and I was, like, 5," Lineth says. Now older and wiser, she says the colors she chose for her piece -- dark blue and light purple -- are the same colors as the crayons in that memory.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  Key West has a lot of signs denoting historic sites. Most point to events and places of significance since Europeans settled the island in the early 19th century.

For the month of March, four new signs point further back into the island's history. They are works of public art by Edgar Heap Of Birds and are part of his Native Host series.

Audrey Armitage


Jennifer Rubell celebrated love with bread and butter at her 13th annual Art Basel breakfast in Wynwood on Thursday. Each year, the artist and daughter of prominent art collectors  Don and Mera Rubell,  feeds guests with a new food-related performance art piece.

Art Miami

Among the elaborate parties and gallery exhibits that come to South Florida every year for Miami Art Week, last year an usual heist became it’s own cause célèbre.

Art crimes make up a $6 billion industry worldwide and, in general, if stolen art doesn’t turn up within the first few months, it could be be a long time before it does. 


Art Miami 2014 was David Smith’s fifth time at the art fair with his Amsterdam-based Gallery, Leslie Smith. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Wynwood is known for its world-renowned street art, but this month it has also been the temporary home of influential museum art in the form of etchings from Pablo Picasso in a show called La Tauromaquia.

Hanging inside the Bakehouse Art Complex, the 26 pieces look like black and white watercolor paintings—they’re actually etchings printed on paper—and depict a scene from a bullfight.

Audrey Armitage. Art by Nick Gilmore

The city of Miami is rich with artistic, architectural and historic detail, but what can be learned from the streets themselves? Local artist Nick Gilmore explores the heavily used, but often forgotten, city streets in his new print series, “Paper Pavement.”

Gilmore, an adjunct professor of printmaking at Florida International University, takes a close look at the details of aging city streets, transforming crumbling street tops into textured prints that capture a unique piece of Miami’s history.