Affordable Care Act

Nearly 500,000 Floridians signed up for an Affordable Care Act plan in the first three weeks of enrollment.

Tom Hudson

This year is six weeks shorter than last year.

Not on the calendar, or course, but there are six fewer weeks this year for people getting their health insurance through the Affordable Care Act -- otherwise known as Obamacare or ACA-- to sign up for 2018.

This year’s open enrollment period to sign-up for the coverage is six weeks long and it’s already underway. It ends December 15th. Last year, participants had three months to buy the health insurance or face a fine.

  

David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Floridians have until Dec. 15 to buy health insurance through healthcare.gov, and a lot has happened since the last shopping season.

Multiple attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” have failed. Now there’s a proposal to dismantle the health care law through the tax bill. President Donald Trump has already stopped funding some pieces of the Affordable Care Act.

So where does that leave the average consumer?

Updated 5:56 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans now plan to try to repeal the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate as part of a tax overhaul bill.

Several Senate Republicans said Tuesday that including the repeal in tax legislation, currently making its way through a key Senate committee, would allow them to further reduce tax rates for individuals without adding more to the deficit.

Lee Nathans, like insurance brokers in many states, expects to be crazy busy for the next several weeks, fielding calls from “people who are not going to be happy.”

Former President Barack Obama took to Twitter Wednesday morning to encourage people to shop for Affordable Care Act health insurance.

Obama's rare appeal comes as his signature health care law is under attack by his successor, President Trump, and Republicans in Congress.

When patients come to The Outreach Clinic in Brandon, one of the first people they encounter is Jackie Perez.

Miami Herald

Today on Sundial: President Donald Trump is going after the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) by ending the subsidies for low-income participants. Trump critics say this will harm the working poor. There are healthcare experts, though, who say this could actually help Florida consumers. The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang will explain what happens next.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

As the uncertainty around the U.S. Senate health care bill continues, about 40 people gathered at the South Florida AFL-CIO Union Hall in Miami Springs on Saturday to demand that Senator Marco Rubio vote against it. 

Organizers called the event an "Empty Chair Town Hall" to highlight that Senator Rubio wasn't there to hear from constituents in person. 

According to the organizers, one of the senator's representatives sent an email expressing Rubio's regrets that he couldn't attend due to other engagements. 

A health care replacement plan is expected to be up for a vote in the U.S. Senate after the July 4 holiday.

In Jacksonville Friday, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) had some strong words for Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell and his fellow Republicans after the plan failed to go up for a vote last week.

Drop In Sudden Cardiac Arrests Linked To Obamacare

Jun 29, 2017

If 22 million Americans lose their health care coverage by 2026 under the GOP Senate’s plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, how many people could die? The question is at the heart of the debate raging in Washington, D.C., but has been difficult to answer.

BOB SELF / AP VIA MIAMI HERALD

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday immersed himself again into the political fray over health care as he went to Washington, D.C., to ask top Republicans to make key changes to a proposed Senate bill to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

Scott's move, which included a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence as well as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, came at the same time that Senate leaders postponed a vote amid defections from GOP senators.

PATRICK FARRELL || MIAMI HERALD STAFF

This week on The Florida Roundup...

The first week of the Trump administration has been marked by a flurry of executive actions — and lots of bombast and argument with the press.

The Affordable Care Act brought the rate of uninsured Americans to a record low 9 percent in 2015. It's the major achievement of the controversial health care law and one the Obama administration likes to tout whenever it can.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell did just that in an interview with NPR on Tuesday.

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