Hurricane Sandy

C. DiMattei

The folks who live along a small stretch of Fort Lauderdale Beach just north of Sunrise Boulevard know the drill.

Actually, they spent the first part of 2013 hearing little else.

Nearly every day since early January, work crews have been out between Northeast 14th Court and Northeast 18th Street  installing a new sea wall.  The first phase involved a huge rig drilling 40 feet down to make way for 500 pieces of sheet metal pilings.

The City of Boca Raton

Imagine enough sand to cover about four football fields, four feet high, and you'll get an idea of how much work is being done to build up the dunes in Boca Raton's Red Reef Park.

C. DiMattei

A four-block stretch of State Road A1A in Fort Lauderdale that got a pounding from Mother Nature last fall is now getting a drilling by construction workers.

Between October and November, crashing waves, high tides and storm surge from Hurricane Sandy destroyed parts of the beach, seawall and roadway just north of Sunrise Boulevard. 

This week, an enormous rig positioned along the beach will drill about 40 feet down, to prepare the way for the installation of a new seawall.

Picking 2012's Word Of The Year

Dec 28, 2012

There is a major decision coming up that will truly define the year 2012. Yes, it's almost time for the American Dialect Society to once again vote on the Word of the Year. Will it be selfie? Hate-watching? Superstorm? Double down? Fiscal cliff? Or (shudder) YOLO?

By Timothy Krause (WarmSleepy)/Flickr

Galleries were flooded, artwork destroyed and the New York art word left reeling when Hurricane Sandy hit at the end of October.

A month later, several of those galleries damaged in the historic storm are now in Miami for Art Basel.

Is Climate Change "Sinking In" For Leaders?

Dec 4, 2012
http://southeastfloridaclimatecompact.org/the-summit/

Leaders from throughout the region meet in Jupiter later this week for the fourth annual Regional Climate Leadership Summit, and the timing couldn't be better. Or worse, depending on your perspective. 

Pounding surf and high tides from Hurricane Sandy's passage have put the issue front and center, especially in Fort Lauderdale.

There, the sea wall along the coastal State Road A1A in Fort Lauderdale has been overrun by the ocean. It has reduced the road from four to two lanes, perhaps permanently.

Busy Hurricane Season Ends; El Niño A No-Show

Nov 30, 2012
NASA Goddard Photo and Video /Flickr

The Atlantic Hurricane season comes to its merciless end today.

It concludes in a busier-than-expected year punctuated by one of the most damaging storms on record, Hurricane Sandy.

When it began, forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted a near-normal season of anywhere between 9 and 15 named storms.

The final number turned out to be 19, with most systems--including the season's only major hurricane, Michael-- spinning out harmlessly in the ocean and posing little threat to land.

NEWSCAST: How South Florida Dodged Hurricanes This Season

Nov 30, 2012
kakela/flickr

 Today is the last day of hurricane season, and South Florida was largely spared. The season concludes a busier-than-expected year punctuated by one of the most damaging storms on record. We take a look back at Sandy, a storm with a track forecasters say they haven't seen in more than 150 years. WLRN-Miami Herald News has details on how a no-show weather pattern from the Pacific may be to blame for an unusual six months. 

NASA Goddard Photo and Video

Hurricane Sandy might have dealt South Florida only a glancing blow, but the monster storm left its mark on the region's beaches.

From Miami Beach to northern Palm Beach County, widespread beach erosion can be seen in many coastal communities.   Palm Beach County environmental director Dan Bates says parts of the county unprotected by the natural buffer of the Bahamas got hit hard.

Florida Power & Light Company

The Florida Power and Light workers who went up north to help restore power after Hurricane Sandy are homeward-bound.

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