All Things Considered on WLRN

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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From Our Listeners
4:39 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Letters: NPR's special series

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Time now for your letters and this correction. This week, the Supreme Court ruled on a case involving the 1980 boxing film, "Raging Bull." It stars Robert De Niro as champion boxer Jake LaMotta.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "RAGING BULL")

ROBERT DE NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder. Harder.

JOE PESCI: (as Joey) Aww, come on. You want to stop now? That's enough of that.

NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Found Recipes
4:39 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Freed From The Sidewalk Cart, This Sauerkraut Goes Global

Don't diss the sauerkraut: It may be a hot dog staple, but it's more versatile than you think.
Courtesy of Edward Lee

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 8:21 pm

Edward Lee thought he knew sauerkraut. The chef for the Louisville, Ky., restaurant 610 Magnolia, grew up in New York City, a place where sauerkraut means one thing: "sidewalk hot dog carts — cheap, bad, overboiled sauerkraut on top of awful kosher hot dogs," he says.

He loved it, as any native New Yorker might, but it was sauerkraut -- boring, safe, standard.

Many years later, after Lee moved to Kentucky, he had a sauerkraut surprise at his then-fiance's house. When she broke out a jar of her mother's homemade sauerkraut, he didn't expect too much.

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Upcoming Elections In Colombia Get Sidetracked

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Colombians vote for president on Sunday, deciding whether to send the incumbent back to office so he can continue peace talks with leftist rebels. John Otis reports that the campaign has gotten dirty.

Law
6:57 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Invoking 'Castle Doctrine,' Mont. Man Pleads Not Guilty In Teen's Death

German student Diren Dede was fatally shot after he entered the garage of Markus Kaarma in Montana last month. Dede was on a one-year high school exchange program to the U.S.
Oliver Hardt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

Montana resident Markus Kaarma pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges of murdering a German exchange student last month. Kaarma shot the 17-year-old while the student was trespassing in his garage. The case has attracted international scrutiny to the contentious debate over how far Americans may go when defending their homes.

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All Tech Considered
6:11 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

For Automakers, Internet-Connected Cars Are A Balancing Act

General Motors says its OnStar 4G LTE connection will allow cars to act as a mobile Internet hub.
General Motors

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

The Internet is coming to your car. Later this year, General Motors will put Internet connectivity directly into its vehicles. It's the largest auto company to do so.

Of course, safety advocates have some concerns about more distractions for drivers.

The promise of technology is always the same one — that it's going to make our life easier. But anyone who's tried to make a hands-free call in the car knows that's not always true. A task as simple as asking your device to call your mom can be an exasperating experience.

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All Tech Considered
5:34 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Storm Shelter App Helps Pinpoint People Amid Tornado's Rubble

After a tornado leveled Moore, Okla., last year, firefighter Shonn Neidel (left) developed an app that helps first responders locate storm shelters under the wreckage.
Courtesy of Shonn Neidel

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 2:24 pm

After a devastating tornado rolled through Moore, Okla., last May, firefighters were scrambling to pull people out of storm shelters. Actually finding those shelters, though, was difficult. Landmarks had been swept away, and the town's emergency dispatcher was overwhelmed with calls.

"Yes, we're at 604 South Classen. There's people down," one caller said. "We're stuck under rubble. ... Please hurry."

Shonn Neidel was one of the firefighters rushing to rescue people that day, and he quickly saw a problem.

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Sports
4:55 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

For Physicians, The Ethics Of Treating Athletes

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Several hundred pro-football players say that the National Football League supplied them with painkillers, risky narcotics, to keep them playing, despite injuries. Some say they weren't told of the seriousness of those injuries. Others say they became addicted to the drugs and they have sued.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Politics
4:52 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

40 Years After Watergate, A Look Back At Nixon's Downfall

Washington Journal

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 1:43 pm

Forty years ago, in mid-May 1974, Elizabeth Drew, the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, wrote this in her journal: "Rumors went around the Capitol today that the President was resigning."

The Capitol, she observed was "noisy and edgy .. and in the hothouse atmosphere, the rumors burst into full bloom."

By August 1974 the president in question, Richard Nixon, would resign rather than face a Senate impeachment trial.

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NPR News Investigations
4:39 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Court Fees Drive Many Poor Defendants Underground

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 10:14 am

The use of fines and fees charged to criminal defendants has exploded. An NPR investigation has found people who can't afford those charges can go to jail for not paying. Hundreds of thousands are hiding from police and the courts.

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Economy
4:10 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Penny Hoarders Hope For The Day The Penny Dies

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Every year, the U.S. government loses money minting pennies. They cost around twice as much to make as they're worth. And some politicians and economists say we ought to just get rid of them. They want the U.S. to kill the penny, take it out of circulation. If that happens, a small group of people plan to make a bunch of money.

NPR's Zoe Chace has that story from our Planet Money team.

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Economy
4:10 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

JPMorgan Chase Announces Detroit Investment

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

JPMorgan Chase will invest $100 million into the Motor City. The bulk of the money will go to small business development, blight removal and job training. Michigan Radio's Sarah Hulett reports.

National Security
4:10 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Senate Advances Judicial Nominee Who Wrote Drone Strike Policy

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:21 pm

The Senate will consider a judicial nominee who wrote legal advice approving drone strikes against Americans overseas. Critics question executive branch authority to execute citizens without trial.

Politics
9:58 am
Wed May 21, 2014

In Kentucky Primary, McConnell Bests Tea Party Challenger

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 10:20 am

In a day packed full of primaries, voters headed to the polls in six states — including three that are expected to have highly competitive Senate races.

Politics
5:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite Drama, Oregon GOP Choice Comes Down To Purity, Practicality

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 8:16 pm

Two Republicans with compelling personal stories are vying for the chance to unseat Oregon's incumbent Democratic senator, Jeff Merkley. Monica Wehby is a doctor with a rare specialty: She performs brain surgery on kids. Her chief opponent, Jason Conger, rose from extreme poverty to attend Harvard Law School in just a few years. The Northwest News Network's Chris Lehman reports on the GOP primary as it unfolds.

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Movie Interviews
5:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Filmmaker Brings Light To Roma, Holocaust Victims Lost To History

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 8:16 pm

The Roma people — commonly called Gypsies — have long been relegated to the margins of European society. As outsiders, they were targeted during the Holocaust, but the number of victims remains little-known. Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells their story in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.

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