Federal Wildlife Officials Are Asking Floridians For Help Locating Threatened, Endangered Species

May 8, 2018

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials are asking Floridians to help with a five-year review of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants.  

These species are found in the southeastern United States and Puerto Rico.

Ken Warren, a spokesperson for the Service said they're looking for information on where species are located, how many live there, and what threats they may face.

“We can’t be everywhere and we can’t see everything so we really encourage people - especially those with valid scientific information, to work with us on this review," said Warren.

Public comments and information will be accepted until July 6. They will be used to ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act are accurate - and recommend changes if they're not.

How to report the information:

To help inform the five-year reviews, the Service is requesting information on: (1) species biology, including population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics; (2) habitat conditions, including amount, distribution, and suitability; (3) conservation measures that have been implemented; (4) threat status and trends; and, (5) other new information, data, or corrections, including taxonomic or nomenclatural changes; identification of erroneous information contained in the ESA list; and improved analytical methods.  

The Federal Register notice announcing the status review of these 35 federally listed fish, wildlife and plants is available online at https://www.fws.gov/policy/frsystem/default.cfm.

Written comments and information about these species should be e-mailed, faxed, or sent via regular mail to:

Fish and Wildlife

Ivory-billed woodpecker:  Amy Trahan, Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 646 Cajundome Blvd., Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506; fax 337–291–3139, phone at 337–291–3100, or by e-mail at lafayette@fws.gov.

Cahow (Bermuda petrel):  John Hammond, by mail at the Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 551 Pylon Drive, #F, Raleigh, NC 27606; fax at 919–856–4556; phone at 919–856–4520; or by e-mail at raleigh_es@fws.gov.

Yellowfin madtom, smoky madtom, and laurel dace: Warren Stiles; and Chucky madtom, Cumberlandian combshell, birdwing pearlymussel, cracking pearlymussel, and dromedary pearlymussel: Stephanie Chance,  Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501; fax at 931–528–7075; phone 931–528–6481; or by e-mail at cookeville@fws.gov.

Yellowcheek darter: Chris Davidson, Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 110 South Amity Road, Suite 300, Conway, AR 72032; fax at 501–513–4480; phone at 501–513–4481; or by e-mail at arkansas-es_recovery@fws.gov.  

Ringed map turtle:  Linda Laclaire; fat pocketbook:  Paul Hartfield; and slackwater darter, pygmy sculpin, and watercress darter:  Daniel Drennen, Mississippi Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6578 Dogwood View Parkway, Jackson, MS 39213; fax at 601–965–4340; phone  601–965–4900; or by e-mail at Mississippi_field_office@fws.gov

Alabama sturgeon:  Jennifer Grunewald; Alabama pearlshell:  Anthony Ford: Alabama lampmussel, pale lilliput, slender campeloma, and armored snail:  Evan Collins, Alabama Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1208B Main St., Daphne, AL 36526; fax at 251–441–6222; phone at 251–441–5184; or by e-mail at Alabama@fws.gov.

Eastern indigo snake:  Michele Elmore, Georgia Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 52560, Fort Benning, GA 31995; fax at 706–544–6419; phone at 706–544–6428; or by e-mail at georgiaes@fws.gov.

Plants

Cumberland sandwort, Pyne’s ground plum, and Spring Creek bladderpod: Geoff Call, Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information above).

Hairy rattleweed:  April Punsulan, Charleston Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 176 Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29412; fax at 843–727–4218; phone at 843–727–4707; or by e-mail at charleston_recovery@fws.gov.  

Brooksville bellflower, Cooley’s water-willow, and Britton’s beargrass: Todd Mecklenborg, North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; fax 904–731–3045, phone 904–731–3336, or by e-mail at northflorida@fws.gov.

Elfin tree fern:  Angel Colon, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Road 301, Km. 5.1, P.O. Box 491, Boquerón, PR 00622; fax at 787–851–7440; phone at 787–851–7297; or by e-mail at caribbean_es@fws.gov.  Aboriginal prickly-apple:  David Bender, South Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information above).

White birds in a nest and Florida skullcap:  Vivian Negron-Ortiz, Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405; fax at 850–769–2177; phone at 850–769–0552; or by e-mail at panamacity@fws.gov.  

Persistent trillium:  David Caldwell, by mail at Georgia Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (see contact information above). 

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