Tom Hudson

Vice president of news and special correspondent

In a journalism career covering news from high global finance to neighborhood infrastructure, Tom Hudson is the Vice President of News and Special Correspondent for WLRN.  He hosts and produces the Sunshine Economy and anchors the Florida Roundup in addition to leading the organization's news engagement strategy.

Hudson was most recently the co-anchor and managing editor of Nightly Business Report on Public Television. In that position Hudson reported on topics such as Federal Reserve interest rate policy, agriculture and global trade. Prior to co-anchoring NBR, he was host and managing editor of the nationally syndicated financial television program “First Business.” He overhauled the existing program leading to a 20 percent increase in distribution in his first year with the program.

Tom also reported and anchored market coverage for the groundbreaking web-based financial news service, WebFN. Beginning in 2001, WebFN was among the first live online streaming video outlets. While there he reported regularly from the Chicago Board Options Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade and the CME. Additionally, he created original business news and information programming for the investor channel of a large e-brokerage firm distributed to six large market CBS Radio stations. 

Before his jump to television and broadband, Tom co-anchored morning drive for the former all-news, heritage 50kw WMAQ-AM/Chicago. He spent the better part of a decade in general news as anchor, reporter, manager and talk show host in several markets covering a wide variety of stories and topics.

He has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in the Journalism Department of Columbia College Chicago and has been a frequent guest on other TV and radio programs as well as a guest speaker at universities on communications, journalism and business.

Tom writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald and the McClatchy-Tribune News Service. He appears regularly on KNX-AM/Los Angeles and WBBM-AM/Chicago for commentary on the economy and investment markets.

While Tom was co-anchoring and managing NBR, the program was awarded the 2012 Program of Excellence Award by American Public Television. Tom also has been awarded two National Press Foundation fellowships including one for the Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists in 2006. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa and is the recipient of several professional honors and awards for his work in journalism.

He is married with two boys who tend to wake up early on the weekends.

Ways to Connect

courtsey of Royal Caribbean Cruises

Cruise ship giant Royal Caribbean wants to build a new passenger terminal at PortMiami. And it may take away cruise ships that currently dock at Port Everglades.

 

The new terminal proposed in Miami is designed to handle Royal Caribbean’s largest ships -- the 5,400-passenger Oasis class vessels. Two of those ships now sail out of Fort Lauderdale. A third one will join them at Port Everglades this fall. Royal Caribbean says at least one of its Oasis ships will call its new terminal in Miami home.

 

Palm Beach Post

"A critical inflection point." "Reached a crossroads." That's how a new study describes the South Florida economy. 

The Weather Channel via Florida Dept. of Finance Services

Florida and it's big insurance companies are ready for a hurricane.

That's the message from four people at the center of the financial preparedness of the state and the insurance industry serving Florida homeowners. In an exclusive interview, each of them expressed confidence that the state, the state-backed insurance provider Citizens Property Insurance, and private insurers have the financial wherewithal to withstand a major storm like Hurricane Andrew or a series of storms like the 2004-2005 seasons hitting the state.

  The Players

Tom Hudson

Over 20,000 students received their undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees this spring from South Florida colleges and universities. Not all of these new degrees will wind up being put to work in South Florida’s job market. Some will go back to school. Some will leave and some will stay. Why?

"There are very talented individuals," says FIU Business Professor Jerry Haar, "who will remain in a location or leave based upon what the opportunities are in their vocational arena as well as their quality of life."

Do They Stay or Do They Go?

Uber.com

A revolution in South Florida began in early June 2014. That revolution is due to end this week. It’s a change in how we hire and pay someone we don’t know to drive us someplace.

 

It was almost two years ago that Uber launched its service in Miami-Dade County. Uber began three weeks after competitor Lyft started it’s own app-based transportation service, but quickly came to dominate the market throughout South Florida for both riders tapping on its app and drivers signing up to drive passengers in their own cars.

 

Tom Hudson

Kyle Carriedo is not a unicorn, but he represents the dreams of South Florida's small technology industry. He is a 35 year-old software engineer who spent five years working on the iTunes team at Apple. He willingly left the gold-standard of tech to move to Miami for a start-up.

A high-skilled high-tech worker from the global high-tech capital, Silicon Valley, coming to South Florida to live and work will not move the needle on official employment statistics, but it is a symbol of Miami's hopes to establish itself as a hub for technology.

Claudia Muñoz/WLRN

Beginning in July, if you have health insurance and go to an in-network hospital but a doctor who is not in your insurance plan’s network helps you, you aren’t supposed to get a surprise bill. The law is designed to stop what’s called balanced billing - the practice of charging a patient for medical care delivered by doctors outside their insurance network even when the the care was performed at an in-network facility.

 

Tom Hudson

The mix of organizations and agencies involved in the Everglades is about as complex as the ecosystem itself: the South Florida Water Management District, the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency, the federal departments of transportation, justice and agriculture and the Miccosukee and Seminole tribes are just some of them.

 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

It’s been 15 months since President Obama placed a phone call from the Oval Office in the White House to Havana, Cuba. He was calling Raul Castro. That conversation upturned more than a half century of American foreign policy as relations have moved from silent isolation to a presidential visit. A lot of history has been made in those short 15 months. Here's some of that history by the numbers:

 

88 • number of years since a sitting U.S. president visited Cuba

Tom Hudson

Just days away from the first sitting U.S. president to visit Cuba in 88 years, the White House announced another set of changes to American travel, trade and financial policies toward Cuba. The further easing of restrictions and the presidential trip come as three leading congressmen expect a vote before the end of the year on removing either the travel ban or the 54-year-old trade embargo.

Tom Hudson

Cesar Cardoza likes a glass of very cold water when he is working. Cardoza is a translator used to working during live, high-profile events. About 15 feet behind the stage at Miami-Dade College's Kendall campus where Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were taking part in a Democratic presidential debate Wednesday night sat Cardoza and his group of translators. Each one of them had a role to play. Cardoza was Sanders.

"You can call it a performance. This is not a science. This is an art," said Cardoza.

When Florida lawmakers gathered in Tallahassee on Day 1 of the 2016 legislative session, Gov.  Rick Scott was clear with his two top priorities: $1 billion in tax cuts and $250 million for the state's economic development agency Enterprise Florida. As the final day of the regular session approaches this week, lawmakers are poised to disappoint the governor on both efforts.

Tom Hudson

Consistently, voters say the economy is one of the top issues in the race for the White House. It ranks higher than any social issue, gun rights or immigration. If Florida voters are anything like voters elsewhere, it’s the economy that is the big issue as early voting in the state's presidential preference primary begins.

University of Florida

The story of modern South Florida is a story of fighting bugs.

Conquering South Florida’s landscape meant tolerating pests of all kinds that are fed by our sunny, moist climate. Those are the same features that inspired Henry Flagler to bring his railroad south from Palm Beach and for Napoleon Bonaparte Broward's promise to drain the Everglades.

Ramon Espinosa / Associated Press

This week, the White House announced President Obama and the First Lady will visit Cuba.

The trip will include meetings with a Castro as well as with Cuban entrepreneurs.

The decision for a presidential trip to Cuba comes with all the historic overtones that have accompanied the changing relationship between America and Cuba since late 2014 when the president announced a new strategy of engagement. It also came with the familiar criticism of the efforts.  We discuss the history and controversy surrounding the trip.

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