Tom Hudson

Vice president of news and special correspondent

In a journalism career covering news from high global finance to neighborhood infrastructure, Tom Hudson is the Vice President of News and Special Correspondent for WLRN.  He hosts and produces the Sunshine Economy and anchors the Florida Roundup in addition to leading the organization's news engagement strategy.

Hudson was most recently the co-anchor and managing editor of Nightly Business Report on Public Television. In that position Hudson reported on topics such as Federal Reserve interest rate policy, agriculture and global trade. Prior to co-anchoring NBR, he was host and managing editor of the nationally syndicated financial television program “First Business.” He overhauled the existing program leading to a 20 percent increase in distribution in his first year with the program.

Tom also reported and anchored market coverage for the groundbreaking web-based financial news service, WebFN. Beginning in 2001, WebFN was among the first live online streaming video outlets. While there he reported regularly from the Chicago Board Options Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade and the CME. Additionally, he created original business news and information programming for the investor channel of a large e-brokerage firm distributed to six large market CBS Radio stations. 

Before his jump to television and broadband, Tom co-anchored morning drive for the former all-news, heritage 50kw WMAQ-AM/Chicago. He spent the better part of a decade in general news as anchor, reporter, manager and talk show host in several markets covering a wide variety of stories and topics.

He has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in the Journalism Department of Columbia College Chicago and has been a frequent guest on other TV and radio programs as well as a guest speaker at universities on communications, journalism and business.

Tom writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald and the McClatchy-Tribune News Service. He appears regularly on KNX-AM/Los Angeles and WBBM-AM/Chicago for commentary on the economy and investment markets.

While Tom was co-anchoring and managing NBR, the program was awarded the 2012 Program of Excellence Award by American Public Television. Tom also has been awarded two National Press Foundation fellowships including one for the Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists in 2006. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa and is the recipient of several professional honors and awards for his work in journalism.

He is married with two boys who tend to wake up early on the weekends.

Ways to Connect

Tom Hudson

The companies Ron Antevy and Rodrigo Griesi help run are very different. One is homegrown, the other was exported to South Florida from Brazil. One has about 200 people on its local payroll. The other has one local employee, but is part of the global gig-economy -- working with freelancers all over the world. One company is more than 20 years old. The other started only five years ago.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The threat of sea level rise affects all of South Florida – from the ocean to the Everglades. The sea has risen nine inches in the past century. It’s predicted to rise another two feet in less than half that time.

 

Evidence of the higher seas can be seen around the region – including increased flooding, raising roads, flood pumps and encroaching saltwater.

Tom Hudson

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez thinks that transportation woes in the region have gotten worse, but he thinks drivers have become more courteous.

Those two statements came at the beginning and at the end of an interview with the mayor focused on transportation in the region.

This is how we started our interview:

WLRN: Would you agree that transportation is in crisis in Miami-Dade County?

Gimenez: No. Does it need improvement? Yes, it does. Has it gotten worse? Yes, it has. 

And this is how it ended:

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Antwan Johnson, a guard at the Miami-Dade Regional Juvenile Detention Center, was arrested as he was getting ready to go to work Monday morning.

 

A grand jury charged Johnson with encouraging inmates to beat up other inmates, including 17-year-old Elord Revolte. He died in 2015 when more than a dozen detainees jumped him – allegedly urged by Johnson.

Tom Hudson

Katlin Svadbik and Mauricio Aristides are co-workers. She’s 25 years old, from Miami, and is finishing her sophomore year at New World School of the Arts College.  He’s 49 years old, born in Chile, grew up all around South America, studied archaeology in Mexico and came to South Florida in 2005.

Public domain

Commuting in South Florida apparently takes herculean patience and resilience to bouts of “traffic trauma.”

 

ApartmentList.com released a report showing a share of commuters in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties travel at least 90 minutes to get to work. South Florida joins a national trend – dubbed a “supercommute” – that’s plaguing other cities, including New York and Washington, D.C.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School almost 10 weeks ago has ushered in a new era of activism. A vocal group of students at Stoneman Douglas has led school walkouts, marches and social media campaigns protesting gun violence. They have inspired student groups across the country to do the same.

 

Sammy Mack

If you're like a lot of Floridians and get your health insurance through an employer, some of your health care decisions may be made for you before you ever set foot in a doctor's office, hospital or lab. 

Miami Herald

Kimson Green, a sophomore at Northwestern Senior High School about to be inducted into the National Honor Society, was shot and killed on Sunday, April 7.  According to police, gunfire erupted while Green was talking with friends in front of an apartment building in Liberty City.

 

On Tuesday, hundreds of Northwestern students walked out and marched to protest gun violence. Teachers and staff joined as they walked through the housing project where the shooting happened.

Tom Hudson

It seems appropriate that the first item on the list of Chinese goods facing the threat of a U.S. tariff in the gathering storm over trade -- Thorium -- is named for the Norse God of Thunder.

 

The last item on America’s $50 billion, 1,300-item list is parts of seats made of bamboo. The U.S. imported about $1 million worth of it from China last year.

 

Miami Herald

For the first time in decades, Florida lawmakers passed new limits on guns. They also approved a record-breaking state budget. Gov. Rick Scott signed the $88.7 billion budget into law on Friday.

 

The budget includes $400 million for school safety and mental health counseling as part of a historic bill in response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. It increases overall public education funding, but not by much in big school districts like those in South Florida.

 

AP Photo/Terry Renna

If the call to boycott travel to Florida over gun control has any impact, this tweet is where it began.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The first Broward Sheriff's deputies who arrived at Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14 were told not to confront the gunman. 

 

According to a dispatch log reviewed by the Miami Herald, the sheriff’s captain who was first in charge of the scene told officers to set up around the building. The Broward Sheriff's Office neither confirmed nor denied that the order was given.

Tom Hudson / WLRN

Mike Fernandez has raised millions of dollars for mostly Republican politicians, but he says no one seeking public office will get his money if they don't support gun control.

Gerald Herbert / AP

The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has developed into a narrative of missed warning signs.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel announced the latest admission last weeks. The school resource officer on duty Scot Peterson did not enter the building where alleged shooter Nikolas Cruz had opened fire.

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