Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Anyone who has ever owned a dog – or any pet, for that matter – can tell you how difficult that last day is.

And so it must have been for the owners of 114 Sony Aibo robotic dogs whose beloved pets were given a Buddhist send-off last week at a ceremony at Japan's 450-year-old Kofukuji Temple.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

A few of the nearly 200 migrants from Central America who traveled by caravan through Mexico to the U.S. border crossing at San Diego have been allowed to apply for asylum.

Eight migrants — three women, four children and an 18-year-old — who said they were fleeing violence in their home countries were allowed through the gate at the border separating Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego on Monday evening, according to caravan organizers.

A magistrate in Australia has ordered Cardinal George Pell, one of the Vatican's senior-most officials, to stand trial on sexual abuse charges involving allegations from multiple individuals dating back decades.

Pell is the highest-ranking Vatican official to be charged in the church's long-standing sex abuse scandal.

Britain's Home Secretary Amber Rudd has resigned after acknowledging that she misled lawmakers about targets for deporting immigrants.

Rudd stepped down following the publication of a letter she sent to Prime Minister Theresa May discussing the "ambitious but deliverable" goal to deport 10 percent more illegal immigrants in the coming years.

Updated 3:55 p.m. ET

A woman who worked as an NBC correspondent says longtime network anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances, including groping her and trying forcibly to kiss her, some two decades ago. Brokaw denied the claims in a email to his colleagues on Friday.

Linda Vester, who covered the Middle East and Africa for NBC and later joined Fox News, was in her 20s at the time she alleges Brokaw made the advances, Variety magazine reports.

President Trump's longtime attorney, Michael Cohen, will invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in a civil lawsuit brought by adult entertainer Stormy Daniels — a move that would prevent him revealing anything that could be used later by federal prosecutors.

"Based on the advice of counsel, I will assert my 5th Amendment rights in connection with all proceedings in this case due to the ongoing criminal investigation by the FBI and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York," Cohen wrote in the filing in Los Angeles federal court.

The U.S. and South Korea are likely to hold a summit next month ahead of a separate proposed summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that could come as early as next month.

That is according to remarks from an unnamed South Korean presidential official quoted by Reuters.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has ordered the expulsion of a 71-year-old Australian nun, giving her 30 days to leave the country after she reportedly joined protest rallies against his government.

Sister Patricia Fox, who has lived in the Philippines for nearly three decades, has had her missionary visa revoked after apparently speaking out against Duterte at demonstrations in southern Davao City.

She has been labeled an "undesirable" foreigner for what the country's Bureau of Immigration says is "her involvement in partisan political activities."

A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to end deportation protections for some young immigrants, saying the White House was "arbitrary and capricious" in moving to end the Obama-era DACA program.

In a blow to President Trump, who has long railed against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates for the District of Columbia said the Department of Homeland Security had failed to provide an adequate rationale for why the program is unlawful.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's pick to lead the Veterans Affairs Department, has been accused of creating a hostile work environment, drinking while on duty and improperly prescribing drugs to staff during his time as White House doctor to two administrations, according to Montana Sen. Jon Tester.

Prince's heirs have filed a wrongful death suit against the drugstore chain Walgreens and an Illinois hospital where the singer was treated, then released, the week before his fatal overdose in 2016.

Minnesota Public Radio's Matt Sepic reports that attorneys representing Prince's estate allege that Trinity Medical Center, in Moline, Ill., where Prince's plane made an emergency landing on April 15, 2016, failed to appropriately diagnose and treat his overdose.

The singer was given two doses of Naloxone, a drug designed to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tells NPR that renegotiating the 2015 nuclear deal between his country and six world powers would be opening a "Pandora's box" that risks damaging U.S. credibility in future international talks.

Jurors in Arizona found U.S. Border Patrol agent Lonnie Swartz not guilty of second-degree murder in a fatal through-the-fence shooting of a teenager from Mexico, but they deadlocked on a lesser charge of manslaughter.

U.S. District Judge Raner Collins declared a mistrial, meaning that Swartz, 43, could be retried for the 2012 death of 16-year-old Antonio Elena Rodriguez of Nogales, Mexico, who was among a group throwing rocks at border agents during an attempt to smuggle drugs into the U.S.

The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered inspections of fan blades on some jet engines of the same type as the one that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines flight, causing the death of a passenger and injuring seven others.

Meanwhile, Philadelphia's medical examiner says Jennifer Riordan, who died on the Dallas-bound Boeing 737 flight, was killed by blunt trauma to her head, neck and torso when she was partially blown out a cabin window shattered by engine debris. Federal inspectors say Riordan, 43, was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident.

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal, who claims to have had a 10-month affair with President Trump that ended in 2007, has settled a lawsuit with the owner of the National Enquirer that kept her from publicly discussing the relationship.

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