Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A number of gun bills appear to be dead for the 2018 legislative session, after failing to pass their first Florida Senate committee Tuesday.

A proposal increasing the mandatory retirement age for Florida judges has unanimously passed a subpanel of the state’s Constitution Revision Commission. That’s the panel that meets every 20 years to revise the state constitution.

The Executive Director of Florida’s wildlife agency is leaving. He’s the latest to step down from a top role at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

This month is Diabetes Awareness Month, and a bipartisan push is underway to do more about the disease that is one of the leading cause of deaths among Floridians.

An organization that deals a lot with human trafficked kids says it’s important to go into the schools and educate potential victims early about traffickers.

Florida’s prison population appears to be on the decline.

Bills aimed at making it easier for human trafficking victims to sue their traffickers have passed a House committee.

A revived bill that wades into the abortion debate has passed its first Florida Senate Committee, but not without opposition.

A bill giving a tax exemption on diapers and feminine hygiene products has cleared its first Florida Senate committee.

With the 2018 legislative session around the corner, Florida lawmakers as well as child welfare stakeholders are starting to dive into how to address the huge turnover of the state’s child protective investigators. Their job is to look into cases called into the state’s child abuse hotline.

Governor Rick Scott says he wants about $200 million for Florida families who adopt foster kids.

In the coming weeks, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice will be putting the finishing touches on a newly created office where juveniles and their families can raise concerns. That’s just one of the reforms the head of DJJ recently told a group of lawmakers, who had some suggestions of their own to address abuses within the system outlined in a Miami Herald investigative series.

The “Up and Away” campaign is underway for the Halloween Season. Health officials are warning parents to keep medicines away from their kids to avoid confusing pills with candy.

Florida’s Guardian ad Litem program is asking the legislature for funding to reimburse its volunteers, who travel hundreds of miles for the abused and neglected kids they advocate for.

After many failed efforts, a group of Democratic Florida lawmakers are hoping this is the year the state legislature will close the pay gap between men and women.

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