Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Two Florida lawmakers are already looking ahead to next year’s legislative session to revive a bipartisan effort to reform the state’s claims bill process. It allows those who sue a government agency over things like injuries or negligence to receive the rest of the money awarded to them—a process that can often take years.

Governor Rick Scott has signed a body-camera related bill into law. But, while it has the support of Florida law enforcement groups, others continue to have reservations.

The Florida Legislature may have sent an $82.4 billion dollar budget to Governor Rick Scott Monday, but Scott is still indicating he may veto it.

The case of a surviving abuse victim that led to the overhaul of Florida’s child welfare system may be close to reaching a resolution. While the claims bill to further compensate the victim has usually died in the past legislative sessions, it’s now headed to the Governor for final approval.

A bill making it easier for certain people to get their mugshots removed and records sealed has already passed the Florida Senate. And, after recently passing its last committee in the House, it’s now headed to the floor.

This month is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and at the Florida Capitol, a large display with more than a thousand shoes worn by sex abuse survivors can be seen through the rest of this week. And, a group of survivors as well as advocates also trekked to Tallahassee to share their stories.

Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Julie Jones says she’s outraged over the inadequate mental health care services offered at a facility operated by one of Florida’s private prison health care providers. So, she terminated that contract with Wexford Health Sources Wednesday.

A number of claims bills which found Florida’s child welfare agency at fault are now heading to the House floor. Among them is a high profile bill involving twins that further compensates the surviving victim, in an abuse case that took his twin sister’s life.

A bill building on Florida’s anti-human trafficking efforts is now heading to both the House and Senate floors.

Less than two weeks after the House proposal was unveiled, The Florida House is expected Wednesday to take up a controversial pension reform package.

Two bills offering a formal apology to former wards who say they were abused in a Panhandle reform school and creates memorials for those buried on the property passed their first House committee Thursday. After hearing some horrific stories, some Florida lawmakers issued apologies of their own.

While several gun bills appeared stalled in the Florida Senate, a couple recently passed the House. One gives places of worship attached to a school the authority to allow guns on the property.

Instead of heading to the Governor, a Stand Your Ground-related bill is now headed back to the Senate for approval. That’s after the House passed its own version of the bill Wednesday.

A bill requiring Florida schools to teach about the dangers of human trafficking is starting to advance in the Senate.

A couple of bills moving in the Florida legislature aims to make law enforcement officers’ jobs a bit easier.

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