Renata Sago

Renata joined the WVIK News team in March 2014, as the Amy Helpenstell Foundation Fellow. She anchors during Morning Edition and All Things Consideredproduces features, and reports on everything from same-sex marriage legislation to unemployment in the Quad Cities. 

Renata fell into public radio after spending two years in France and Guadeloupe. She got her start as an intern for Worldview, a global affairs program that airs on WBEZ, Chicago's NPR member station. There, she produced a variety of segments covering politics and culture. She later joined Vocalo as a producer for two weekly programs.

Renata is Chicago native and a graduate of Brown University and Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane. 

The moments inside a courtroom in Orlando in 2007 were quick and consequential for Marquis McKenzie. The 16-year-old stood handcuffed behind a lectern. A juvenile judge announced his charges, then apologized that he could no longer take up the case.

"You're being direct filed," he told McKenzie, who was accused of armed robbery over a cellphone and a wallet. "You understand what I'm saying? You're being charged as an adult now."

McKenzie remembers his mother wailing from the courtroom benches, begging the judge to reconsider.

The more than 43 million passengers traveling through Orlando International Airport each year will now have access to free CPR training. The American Heart Association debuted its first hands-only CPR kiosk there Wednesday.

Four Central Florida educational institutions received approval this week from the State Board of Education to offer Bachelor of Science degrees in nursing. 

Less than six months into state attorney Aramis Ayala’s term, the Legislature voted to cut $1.3 million from her budget and she says that decision is having an impact on her office's ability to fight human trafficking.

The move came after Ayala announced she would not pursue the death penalty, and after Gov. Rick Scott subsequently reassigned two dozen ninth circuit murder cases to fifth circuit state attorney, Bradley King.

WMFE

The dispute between Governor Rick Scott and Orange-Osceola state attorney Aramis Ayala over the death penalty advances to state Supreme Court Wednesday morning with oral arguments. Attorneys for both sides will have twenty minutes to argue whether it was legal for Governor Scott to take two dozen murder cases from Ayala’s office and reassign them to fifth circuit prosecutor Brad King.

Associated Press

Brazilian soccer legend Marta is expected to kick off the National Women’s Soccer League home opener Saturday against the Washington Spirit. Marta is the latest big name to join the Orlando Pride.

The five-time consecutive FIFA World Player of the Year touched down in Orlando on Thursday from Sweden. She is widely viewed as the greatest women’s soccer player of all time.

Joe Burbank / Associated Press

National and state civil rights groups filed paperwork Thursday supporting Orange and Osceola state attorney Aramis Ayala’s federal lawsuit against Governor Rick Scott. In an amicus brief, the eight groups said Scott overstepped his bounds by reassigning 23 of Ayala’s cases to prosecutor Brad King who oversees cases in Lake and Marion counties.

Creative Commons

This week, sheriffs across Florida publicly challenged the Department of Homeland Security for singling out agencies it says won’t help enforce immigration law. Meanwhile, sheriff’s offices are accusing DHS of misleading the public in a request, citing the agency for making requests that would violate people’s civil rights.

Here’s a short explanation of what’s happening:

Associated Press

Sheriffs across Florida say the federal government is asking them to overstep the law in a move that will violate people’s civil rights.

Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala has sued Gov. Rick Scott, challenging his ability to remove her from death penalty cases.
WMFE

State lawmakers are proposing to cut the budget for Orange and Osceola State Attorney’s office by $1.3 million and twenty-one positions.

Republican Rep. Scott Plakon of Longwood is steering the effort as part of the House Judiciary Appropriations Subcommittee, which released a draft of the budget on Monday.

“We thought that if she’s not going to do part of her job, basically, that we would withhold some of that money pending on what the governor does and so forth,” Plakon said in a phone interview.

color:#333333">A school devoted to teaching toddlers who are deaf and have difficulty hearing will open its doors Wednesday in Winter Park.


WMFE

Gun violence prevention advocates, victims of gun violence, and their relatives in Orlando and other cities say FedEx is helping the National Rifle Association grow its membership. A handful of organizers protested Wednesday afternoon outside a FedEx downtown.

The protest was one of several taking place nationwide at the height of the holiday season when millions of customers are using the global shipping company to send gifts to loved ones.

Institute for Women's Policy Research

Rural north Florida counties and parts of south Florida are home to the highest rates of women living in poverty according to a new report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

The group found that more than twenty-five percent of women live in poverty in Gilchrist, DeSoto, Hamilton, Alachua, and Hardee counties and that the rate is also high for women in Miami-Dade county.

flickr

A federal court has overturned a ruling that kept middle schoolers in Florida from forming gay-straight alliance clubs to help combat bullying of straight and LGBT students.

While the race at the top of the ballot between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton consumes the nation's attention, a series of consequential district attorney races around the country could reshape the criminal justice system from the ground up.

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