Nancy Klingener

Reporter

Nancy Klingener covers the Florida Keys for WLRN. Since moving to South Florida in 1989, she has worked for the Miami Herald, Solares Hill newspaper and the Monroe County Public Library.

She is a Spring 2014 graduate of the Transom Story Workshop. She is on the board of the Key West Literary Seminar and reviews books for the Miami Herald. 

Simon Cocks / flickr

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads .

Pablo Cartaya, author of The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Key West has long prided itself on its all-welcome ethos and has an official city motto of "One Human Family."

Tuesday, the City Commission approved a resolution affirming those values and vowing that all city services would remain accessible to all residents "regardless of immigration status." The resolution also stated that the city would not investigate or help investigate immigration status unless it was required to by state or federal law.

Mark Hedden

Cletus the crocodile may be lonely no more.

The American crocodile that showed up at the Dry Tortugas in 2003 was captured and loaded onto a seaplane over the weekend, then released in the Everglades.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads

Arlo Haskell, Key West Literary Seminar executive director

Nancy Klingener / WLRN


Amber Ernst-Leonard / Florida Keys Community College

The graduation ceremony for Florida Keys Community College's Corrections Basic Recruit Academy this week led to more celebration than expected.

Graduate Juan Valdes, Jr., proposed to his girlfriend, Jacqueline Collins. (She said 'Yes.')

In all 10 students completed the 420-hour training program to become Florida corrections officers. All 10 have jobs lined up at one of the three jails in the Keys.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Monroe Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Beaver will be out of a job at the end of June. The state Medical Examiners Commission Wednesday unanimously voted against sending his name to Gov. Rick Scott for re-appointment.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads.

Happy reading!

Teresa Frontado, WLRN digital editor:

I am reading Bad Feminist, a collection of essays by Roxane Gay.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Frank Deford recorded his final commentary for NPR this week — in Key West, where he spends winters. After that recording, he and WLRN Keys reporter Nancy Klingener talked about why he's chosen the southernmost city as his home.

Mark Hedden

This story originally aired in December 2009.

Writer Nancy Klingener lives in Key West.  Every year, she looks forward to a parade which marks the arrival of the holiday season.

She says,  “In South Florida, seasons are subtle.  The leaves don’t change color in the fall.  The mud doesn’t sprout grass in the spring.  So you look for different signs.”

Edward Barham / Naval Air Station Key West

Over the last several years, some new arrivals have taken up residence at Naval Air Station Key West's airfield on Boca Chica Key: American crocodiles.

"We don't know exactly how many we have," said Edward Barham, the environmental director for the base. "But we know we have four or five of them pretty much all the time."

Mark Hedden / WLRN

Constellation is an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, but she spends most of her time in the Pacific. She's part of the Navy's Marine Mammal program, based in San Diego.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office

A horse that arrived in South Florida emaciated and covered in sores five months ago is now enjoying retirement in Key West.

Trigger was confiscated from his owner in November in Miami. The owner reportedly rode him 700 miles from South Carolina with no money to feed the horse or himself, according to a press release from the Monroe County Sheriff's Office.

Mark Hedden / WLRN

The end of the wet-foot, dry-foot policy, which allowed Cuban refugees who made it to U.S. soil to stay in the country, also means the end of another phenomenon in the Florida Keys: refugee boats that were abandoned in remote islands.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

As the rainy season returns to South Florida and the fight against Zika gears up, the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District Tuesday began a first-in-Florida trial of a control method that uses bacteria to reduce mosquito populations.

The district will release 20,000 male mosquitoes infected with the Wolbachia bacteria twice a week for the next 12 weeks. The releases will take place in a 10-acre test site on Stock Island,  and mosquito traps there will be compared with a similar-sized control area nearby (but separated by a buffer).

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