Luis Hernandez

Morning anchor

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

For Latino immigrants, the saying 'home is where the heart is' is complicated. Home is where you settle your roots and build your family and your legacy. But there will always be that part of your heart that yearns for home, as in the land of your birth, the country of your ancestors.

Miami Herald.

As the Republican National Convention is underway in Cleveland, Ohio, a few Florida politicians are on hand to do more than just support the party, and Donald Trump. People like Gov. Rick Scott are also possibly building support for their next election.

Patricia Mazzei of the Miami Herald is there and tells us how state politics are also playing a part in the Republican National Convention: 

Pixabay

Whether you're into romance or science fiction, biographies or memoirs,  publishers know the summer is a big time for people to dive deep into a good story. Miami Herald book critic Connie Ogle  has her reading list and recommendation to enjoy during the next weeks.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

Loyalty is something you hear a lot about in mobster movies and television shows. But as ruthless as someone like Tony Soprano can be, it pales in comparison to the ruthlessness and ego-laden industry which is professional sports.

Natacha Pisarenko / Miami Herald/AP

We're just weeks away from the 2016 Rio Olympics and there are a lot of questions about safety: safety concerning crime and safety concerning zika. Michelle Kaufmann, sports reporter for The Miami Herald, is going to Rio to cover the games and puts these fears in context. This will be her 14th Olympic games. Her first was the  Albertville 1992 Winter Games. Here are her comments:

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The newest data from the U.S. Census shows Florida's population grew by almost a million and a half between 2010 and 2015. And, more than half of those new residents are Hispanic.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

These days the Sun Life Stadium looks like one of those Transformers robots that got stuck midway through its metamorphosis into something. Cranes stretch up into the sky, metal rigs like giant Lego sets sit on each corner of the stadium. It's impressive, but will it be done in time for the start of the season, let alone the start of pre-season?

Reporter Adam Beasley of the Miami Herald says it is likely, barring Mother Nature interfering.

Julia Rose Photo

Miami said goodbye Wednesday evening to one of the pioneers of the craft beer movement in the city and did  it the way he would have liked it: by gathering at his beloved brewery and raising a pint (or two) in his name. 

Piero Rodriguez, one of the founding brewers at MIA Beer Company , passed away last weekend in a car accident.  Brewers from around South Florida and beyond have been posting their condolences online.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

Recovering from a natural catastrophe, say like Hurricane Andrew, can sometimes be a long process. Take a look at Homestead.

In 1992, Andrew devastated the south Florida city, destroying the air force base, more than a thousand mobile homes, and one of the city's historic sites. Roughly a third of the population of 30,000 left shortly after the storm.

It didn't take long for housing and people to come back. But, the downtown area along Krome Avenue took a little longer, even though it had been historically the heart of the town.

Kara Dapena / Miami Herald

It appears some, actually many, condo associations in South Florida are over-charging people on fees. Nick Nehamas of the Miami Herald uncovered the story recently and talked to us about what he found: 

WLRN

I never watched a Muhammad Ali fight live. I was too young, having been born in 1972. I really didn't get into boxing until a brash, violent, and menacing kid named Mike Tyson showed up. But, like most people, I knew the name Ali. Who didn't? His name was iconic.

Like a lot of people, I didn't get to know much about Muhammad until much later in life. And I also didn't know that a young boxer known as Cassius Clay arrived in Miami in the early 60s, trained in our streets, won here one of the biggest upset victories in boxing history and soon changed his name to Ali.

Roberto Koltun / El Nuevo Herald staff

A Miami Charter Review Committee has been looking into the idea that the city of Miami should have a strong mayor. Currently it is an executive mayor position, which makes it a mostly figurehead post.

Commissioner Francis Suarez is leading the push to make the  mayor of Miami more powerful and explains why the issue should be taken to the voters. 

Miami Herald

Stoneman Douglas High School will be going to its first ever state title game in Class 9A title for baseball, after getting the 3-2 win over West orange High School. The Eagles will take on either Miami Columbus or Tampa Alonso Saturday at 4p.m. for the title. 

Douglas alum Anthony Rizzo of the Chicago Cubs sent out a little love to his former team.

http://planzmiami.com/

There have been three deaths of cyclists on the Rickenbacker Causeway in the past five years. The 2012 death of Allen Cohen, led to the creation of the Aaron Cohen Life Protection Act, a law that puts larger penalties on motorists who hit cyclists. 

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

A recent study found that all that pumping being done to protect Miami Beach from flood waters is actually sending waste, especially human waste, into Biscayne Bay.  

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