Luis Hernandez

Morning anchor

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

Wikipedia

Think about how much life has changed since Hurricane Andrew, some 24 years ago. We likely had that wall phone in the kitchen with the really, really, really long cord. We got most of our news from television, radio or newspapers. The web was something Spiderman produced as he battled villains. 

Miami Herald

Recently, Daniel Chang of the Miami Herald published a piece about the Florida Department of Health's underreporting of Zika cases. Shortly after that piece, the DOH sent out a rebuttal (see below). We spoke with Chang about where he got his information and what questions the state has refused to answer.

What is your take on the DOH's rebuttal of your story?

Evan Vucci AP / Miami Herald

GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump is being criticized for recent comments on immigration. Some news outlets have claimed he's flip flopped on his original hard stance on the topic. On CNN, he said there was no road to amnesty, contradicting comments made earlier in the week where he spoke about being open to the idea. 

It's one of those things about being a teenage boy:  in high school you're kind of  expected to go out for the football team.

Granted, that's not always the case. Some schools have elite programs and only the best players will ever wear the helmet. But that wasn't the case for my school.

I am from the Wellington High School class of 91. Let me give you some background.: My freshman year we were at Forest Hill High. But the district decided to build Wellington kids their own school, and voila! 

Miami Herald

The Miami Herald's Howard Cohen often  gets to share the stories of regular Miamians through an obituary. His most recent piece looks at Myriam Correa-Sherman, one of the first Hispanics to receive a heart transplant at Jackson Memorial Hospital back in 1991. The gift she received inspired her to dedicate the rest of her life to raising awareness in the Hispanic community about the importance of donating organs. 

Here is what Cohen had to say about Myriam Correa-Sherman's story: 

Lynne Sladky AP / Miami Herald

I've been trying to find the best example of the tragic hero to describe the career of Alex Rodriguez. I think about Jay Gatsby, a man born with glaring good looks but so insecure in his character that he creates these fantastical stories and throws the most outlandish parties to impress one woman.

On some level, Alex Rodriguez reminds me of Anakin Skywalker from episodes II and III (which were actually the fifth and sixth Star Wars movies). Remember how Skywalker was dubbed The Chosen One but then throws it all away and eventually gives in to the dark side?  

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

For Latino immigrants, the saying 'home is where the heart is' is complicated. Home is where you settle your roots and build your family and your legacy. But there will always be that part of your heart that yearns for home, as in the land of your birth, the country of your ancestors.

Miami Herald.

As the Republican National Convention is underway in Cleveland, Ohio, a few Florida politicians are on hand to do more than just support the party, and Donald Trump. People like Gov. Rick Scott are also possibly building support for their next election.

Patricia Mazzei of the Miami Herald is there and tells us how state politics are also playing a part in the Republican National Convention: 

Pixabay

Whether you're into romance or science fiction, biographies or memoirs,  publishers know the summer is a big time for people to dive deep into a good story. Miami Herald book critic Connie Ogle  has her reading list and recommendation to enjoy during the next weeks.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

Loyalty is something you hear a lot about in mobster movies and television shows. But as ruthless as someone like Tony Soprano can be, it pales in comparison to the ruthlessness and ego-laden industry which is professional sports.

Natacha Pisarenko / Miami Herald/AP

We're just weeks away from the 2016 Rio Olympics and there are a lot of questions about safety: safety concerning crime and safety concerning zika. Michelle Kaufmann, sports reporter for The Miami Herald, is going to Rio to cover the games and puts these fears in context. This will be her 14th Olympic games. Her first was the  Albertville 1992 Winter Games. Here are her comments:

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The newest data from the U.S. Census shows Florida's population grew by almost a million and a half between 2010 and 2015. And, more than half of those new residents are Hispanic.

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