Luis Hernandez

Host, Sundial/ Afternoon Anchor

Luis Hernandez is an award-winning journalist and host whose career spans three decades in cities across the U.S. He’s the host of WLRN’s newest daily talk show, Sundial (Mon-Thu), and the news anchor every afternoon during All Things Considered.

Luis joined the WLRN newsroom in 2014, and he’s no stranger to life in South Florida. He is a true Florida kid. He grew up in Palm Beach County, spent Hurricane Andrew in a closet in Doral, and has spent almost 40 years as a resident of the Sunshine State.

Before arriving at WLRN, Luis spent four years at KNPR in Las Vegas, as the host of the daily talk program, State of Nevada. While there, he worked to increase the station’s reach within the Hispanic community. He covered the 2012 presidential election from “Sin City,” as well as environmental issues, immigration policy, and the recovery from the 2008 housing disaster.

While working at WUFT, he mentored students from the University of Florida’s celebrated journalism program. He has spent roughly 14 years now in public broadcasting.

Before entering the realm of public radio, Luis worked in news and sports for Clear Channel Communications in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Jacksonville. He also spent two years in television at LeSea Broadcasting in Denver, Colorado.  

When he’s not behind the mic or on the phone with sources, he spends his free time trying to finish his “great American novel.”

WLRN

There is assistance available to homeowners and business owners who are still recovering from Hurricane Irma damage. We spoke with John Mills of FEMA and Richard Daigle of the SBA on Sundial to answer listener questions about how to get that assistance.

Courtesy Sara Kaufman

Today on Sundial: There's a new report from independent research firm Climate Central that looks at the 15 most at-risk cities in the US to sea-level rise. Of those 15 cities, 12 are in South Florida. We talk to WLRN's Kate Stein about that report, as well as how people in the region view the issue of flooding. Plus, we'll cover the upcoming ballot issue about the Miami Forever Fund.

PBS

Today in Sundial: The Palm Beach Post recently published a story about how Riviera Beach city leaders are spending taxpayer dollars. It showed city commissioners and the mayor had taken numerous trips, stayed at expensive hotels and even on pet projects. We'll hear from the Post reporter Tony Doris and Riviera Beach Mayor Thomas Masters.

http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/news/2017/10/19/uf-researcher-identifies-new-invasive-ant-florida/

Today in Sundial: Congresswoman Frederica Wilson is returning to Washington D.C. after receiving death threats for her recent kerfuffle with the White House. It was about two weeks ago when White House Chief of Staff John Kelly claimed that the congresswoman had bragged about getting money for a new FBI building in Miami-Dade. But, it turns out that was untrue.

South Florida lost a lot of trees during Hurricane Irma. While Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties avoided a direct hit, the storm managed to topple  palm and other canopy trees, littering the streets with tree trunks, branches and palm fronds.

One month later, the debris from the trees and shrubbery remains on the curb or street waiting to be picked up. 

Major resorts in the Keys are closing for months due to hurricane damage. The biggest may be the Hawks Cay Resort in Duck Key, which has announced it will close until next summer, letting go of 260 employees. What does this mean for recovery? And, what sort of services will the county provide to help those workers? We talk with Monroe County Mayor George Neugent.

https://www.national-park.com/welcome-to-biscayne-national-park/

Today in Sundial: Puerto Ricans living on the island may be without power for months. Some parts of the island could be living without basic services for more than a year. WLRN's Tim Padgett was there recently, and he says the best way to describe what's happening in Puerto Rico is basic paralysis. 

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: The water in Lake Okeechobee is starting to go back down after rising more than 17 feet after Hurricane Irma. That was edging dangerously close to the record of 18.5 after Hurricane Wilma. The rise forced the Army Corps of Engineers to monitor the Herbert Hoover Dike for any damage or risks. We spoke with WLRN reporter Peter Haden, who was at the dike and traveled through communities near the lake to find out how people are living with the constant danger.

WLRN

Today in Sundial: Tens of thousands of South Florida residents are still in need of food assistance more than a month after Hurricane Irma smashed through the region. Recently, people waited in lines for hours to qualify for D-Snap, a federal program being facilitated by the Florida Department of Children and Families.

WLRN

Today in Sundial: Hollywood commissioners are debating the new names for three streets named after Confederate Gens. Robert E Lee, John Bell Hood and Nathan Bedford Forrest, the grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. What should those new names be? Different people have different ideas. We'll hear from the man who has been fighting to make the change for more than a decade, as well as the current mayor.

Today in Sundial: New World Symphony, in collaboration with MIT Media Lab, and with support from the John S and James L Knight Foundation, is putting together a new show titled Project 305. We spoke with composer Ted Hearne and filmmaker Jonathan David Kane about  the unique sounds and videos they collected from everyday folks to put this symphony together. By the way, one of those sounds includes a dog chasing peacocks.

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen announced earlier this year that she would not be running for office again in 2018. That brings to an end almost 40 years of public service. The Republican legislator joins us to discuss why she made the choice to end her political career, as well as chiming in about some of the big issues being debated on Capitol Hill.

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: Miami Beach voters will be picking a new mayor in November. They'll also have to vote on a referendum that could change how business operates on part of Ocean Drive. We'll talk about the ballot and the options voters will have. We also dig into the controversies that have led to the end of Councilman Michael Grieco's political career.

Miami Herald

Today on Sundial: President Donald Trump is going after the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) by ending the subsidies for low-income participants. Trump critics say this will harm the working poor. There are healthcare experts, though, who say this could actually help Florida consumers. The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang will explain what happens next.

Miami Herald

Bees have struggled for years with Colony Collapse Disorder. And there are all sorts of ideas on how to solve it. They include everything from backyard beehives to filling empty lots in cities with hives - even using robot bees

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