Karen Rundlet

Karen Rundlet worked as television news producer for a long, long time in cities like Atlanta, New York, and Miami. Not once during that period did she ever say words like "action" or "cut."  Seven years ago, she joined The Miami Herald's newsroom as a Multimedia Manager. She built the company a Video Studio, where sports segments, celebrity reports, and interviews with heads of state have been shot and produced. In 2010, she also began producing a business segment for WLRN/Miami Herald News radio and writing business articles for www.MiamiHerald.com. Karen calls herself "a Miami girl with Jamaican roots," (practically a native) having lived in the city long enough to remember when no one went to South Beach. She spends her weekends with an Arsenal Football loving husband and a young daughter who avoids skirts that aren't "twirly enough."

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Miami History
5:16 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Thirty Years Later, Miami Vice's Impact Still Resonates

A Miami Herald clip from Miami Vice's debut year.
Credit Miami Herald

In the 1980s, Miami was a crime capital. Dade County -- that’s what it was called then -- had the highest murder rate in the country, and nearly three quarters of all the cocaine and marijuana that made it into the U.S. passed through South Florida.

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Sunshine Economy
8:26 am
Tue May 6, 2014

How Video Game Designers Make A Living In Miami

Credit freedigitalphotos.net

Miami is a magnet for entrepreneurs in fashion, film, and visual arts. So it makes sense then that a creative technology sector could and would grow from the intersection of those disciplines. In the last couple of years, a small video-game industry has developed in South Florida.

Some of the players include Dark Side Studios in Sunrise, Magic Leap in Hollywood, Shiver Entertainment, whose bosses just leased space in South Miami’s Sunset Place, and Skyjoy Interactive on Brickell Avenue.

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Friday Business Report
1:31 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

The Growth Of Coaching Businesses In South Florida

Credit freedigitalphotos.net

This story originally aired on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014.

Last year, U.S. consumers spent more than 11 billion dollars on CDs, books, seminars, and coaching all aimed at making some part of their lives better.

The particular field of one-on-one coaching has grown exponentially since the beginning of the recession in 2007.

Miami's Dan Silverman grew his coaching business out of something he was doing free at bars all over South Florida.

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Sunshine Economy
5:36 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How Non-Brewers Are Using Beer As A Branding Tool

The Miami Brewing Company, owned by South Florida winemakers Peter and Denisse Schnebly opened the first production brewery in Miami-Dade County. One beer is called Vice IPA.
Credit Karen Rundlet / Miami Herald

The number of microbreweries in South Florida could triple by the end of 2015. More brewers are well on their way to setting up shop locally, and from a business perspective, it’s about time: Craft beer has been popular in the U.S. since the mid ‘90s. Brewers know South Floridians have a taste for it and they’re excited to bring their flavorful suds to underserved local customers. But it’s not just brewers who recognize these specialty brews as good business.

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The Sunshine Economy
8:03 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Redland's Schnebly: From Wine To Beer To Spirited Expansion

Customers usually show up at the tasting bar just before lunch hour at Schnebly Redland's Winery.
Credit Karen Rundlet / Miami Herald

 

Florida’s southernmost winery is located in the heart of Miami Dade’s farm country, Redland. It’s called Schnebly Redland’s Winery and it’s been up and running over a decade. For me, the trip to Schnebly Redland’s Winery meant a couple of hours in the car, heading south on U.S. 1, with a view of Miami Dade slowing down.

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Business
4:45 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Friday Business Report Revisits Innovation Jobs Program In South Florida

Ronald Herbas is on the right in a dark suit.
Credit courtesy Ronald Herbas

Last fall, an innovation training program called StartupQuest launched in South Florida. Full time employees were not welcome. It was specifically for folks who were out of work or underemployed.

The goal of the program was to help people get new technology skills -- and jobs.

When you hear the words "technology" or "innovation," you might picture a kid, in a hoodie, coding all night at a computer. But in this program, the average age of participants was 51, and almost everyone had a master’s degree and decades of experience.

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Tech Education
1:59 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Girls Who Code Aims To Bring More Women Into STEM

Credit Courtesy of Girls Who Code

There’s an enormous push in South Florida right now to grab more of the innovation economy, but we’re not the only region making a play for this sector. The competition nationally is fierce. Cities like St. Louis, Charlotte, and Phoenix have made bigger strides when it comes to growing as tech hubs

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Friday Business Report
7:09 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Civic-Branding Agency Hopes To Redefine Miami

Binsen Gonzalez, founder, Our City Thoughts.
Credit Emily Michot / Miami Herald

  Binsen Gonzalez almost left Miami, but he received funding for his idea just in time.

“I was about to leave for San Francisco because I felt like there wasn’t something right for me. And then one of my mentors was like if you don’t see it, make it happen.”

That mentor happened to be former Mayor Manny Diaz. The Knight Foundation awarded Gonzalez a $75,000 grant last week for his digital civic start-up idea called Our City Thoughts.

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Nelson Mandela
8:10 am
Wed December 11, 2013

The 'Mandela Snub' How I Remember It

Credit South Africa The Good News / Wikimedia Commons

  It was the summer of 1990. I was home, living with my parents, working part-time at a Miami television station as a production assistant. I made an aspiring journalist’s wage, $6 an hour.

A multiracial group of students back at my Washington, D.C., college had staged sit-ins calling for the school to divest from South Africa. I remember campus-wide "reverse apartheid" protest days. We were learning about modern-day, systemic racial segregation.

But in 1990, Nelson Mandela, who'd spent 27 years as a political prisoner, was released.

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Friday Business Report
4:55 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

I'm a lawyer. Now what?

Credit Flickr

  The legal profession is going through a bit of an existential crisis and certainly an economic one. Large law firms that 10 years ago would have been expected to survive any financial crisis are reacting to a new, constricting marketplace with staff reductions and requests for capital contributions from partners. Host Karen Rundlet talks with Greenberg Traurig's Brad Kaufman about new opportunities for hiring and partnership in today's legal environment.

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Friday Business Report
8:08 am
Tue November 19, 2013

What If South Beach Becomes The Next Venice?

Credit Kenny Malone / WLRN

Structural engineers don't necessarily view rising sea levels as certain disaster. By definition, it's the job of the engineer to solve design and construction problems caused by environmental changes.

Business journalist Karen Rundlet examines some proposed solutions for sea-level rise. She interviews the University of Miami's Dr. Antonio Nanni about embracing some unusual possibilities. Click play to hear the interview.

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Friday Business Report
8:00 am
Mon October 28, 2013

How South Florida Supermarkets Move Customers Through Their Stores

Publix supermarket #794 in Miami Shores was recently remodeled. The deli was expanded, as was the produce section. Publix says they remodel stores every five years.
Credit Karen Rundlet

The store you probably spend the most time in isn’t a boutique or a department store. I’ll bet, over the course of a year, it’s the supermarket. 

On average, supermarket customers shop for groceries twice a week and spend about $100. In South Florida, Publix is the marketshare leader – dominating with close to 250 stores. Winn Dixie is second. And then, we have Walmart and Sedano’s.

While each chain is distinct in terms of pricing and store environment, there are commonalities in how many of them are designed, said Paco Underhill, a consultant and author who studies the science of how people shop all over the world.

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Business
11:39 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Why South Florida Workers Are Learning Portuguese

Alexandra Estrada (right) is studying Portuguese at the Cultural Center for Language Studies in Miami. Estrada encounters many Brazilian customers in her job with the cruise industry. Her teacher is Valmira Hayes.
Credit Karen Rundlet

Miami Dade, Broward and Palm Beach. All three counties beat the national average when it comes to the number of homes that have foreign language speakers.

We already know that local polling places offer ballots in English, Spanish, Creole. And that business is conducted in those three languages.

But in recent years, it’s Portuguese that has established itself as a new language of commerce.

Carolina Pinho is Brazilian. She moved to South Florida more than 20 years ago.

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Culture
6:21 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Carnival Will Close Out With Parade In Sun Life Stadium On Sunday

Dana Matthews (left) and Tarakaye Clunis, participated in Miami Broward One Carnival in Miami Gardens in 2011. This week's parade is Sunday.
Credit Carl Juste / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

The walk up of parties for the Miami Broward Carnival weekend has officially begun.

Still, the big parade at Sun Life Stadium with all the bands isn’t until Sunday and that means plenty of people are still hustling on the last minute preps, such as finishing the bright shiny costumes. 

Inside one garage in Miramar the sewing crew hums to soca beats as they glue yet another rhinestone onto another skirt of a Carnival costume. Music plays from the computer.

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Friday Business Report
4:34 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

How Reverse Mentoring Promotes International Business Solutions

Many respected leaders will point to mentors who helped them with their rise to success, and most of the time, that mentor was a more experienced individual. But a new local partnership is counting on younger mentors to school their elders.

The Miami Herald's Karen Rundlet tells us how digital proficiency is driving this program.

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