Karen Rundlet

Karen Rundlet worked as television news producer for a long, long time in cities like Atlanta, New York, and Miami. Not once during that period did she ever say words like "action" or "cut."  Seven years ago, she joined The Miami Herald's newsroom as a Multimedia Manager. She built the company a Video Studio, where sports segments, celebrity reports, and interviews with heads of state have been shot and produced. In 2010, she also began producing a business segment for WLRN/Miami Herald News radio and writing business articles for www.MiamiHerald.com. Karen calls herself "a Miami girl with Jamaican roots," (practically a native) having lived in the city long enough to remember when no one went to South Beach. She spends her weekends with an Arsenal Football loving husband and a young daughter who avoids skirts that aren't "twirly enough."

Ways to Connect

Miami Herald Staff

The state of Florida is known for its great weather -- the state’s official nickname, after all, is the “Sunshine State.” But try selling solar energy in Florida and you’re likely to get a chilly reception, says a Miami-based founder of a solar startup.

Ludovic Roche, co-founder of PWRstation, claims that when it came to keeping his company’s headquarters in Miami, he and business partner, Robert Albertella, were encouraged to take the better offer and leave the U.S.

In our continuing series on female leadership, we look at the technology sector. Certainly it is a lucrative industry and it's been criticized for gender imbalance.

Women make up only a quarter of the tech industry workforce, even though more women now enroll in college than men.

And here's another interesting data point -- women in Western countries use the internet 17 percent more than men do. So how does this all compute in terms of female leadership?

Not too long ago, good customer service meant a warm welcome and personal attention. Today, great customer service can mean leaving the customer alone to fend for themselves. That shift is thanks, in part, to technology.

It’s the smartphone that allows customers to be simultaneously social and anti-social in how they relate to and interact with service staff. Websites like TripAdvisor, OpenTable and Yelp have given customers a voice, and restaurants and hotels are listening -- and responding.

Miami Herald

In the 1980s, Miami was a crime capital. Dade County -- that’s what it was called then -- had the highest murder rate in the country, and nearly three quarters of all the cocaine and marijuana that made it into the U.S. passed through South Florida.


Miami is a magnet for entrepreneurs in fashion, film, and visual arts. So it makes sense then that a creative technology sector could and would grow from the intersection of those disciplines. In the last couple of years, a small video-game industry has developed in South Florida.

Some of the players include Dark Side Studios in Sunrise, Magic Leap in Hollywood, Shiver Entertainment, whose bosses just leased space in South Miami’s Sunset Place, and Skyjoy Interactive on Brickell Avenue.


This story originally aired on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014.

Last year, U.S. consumers spent more than 11 billion dollars on CDs, books, seminars, and coaching all aimed at making some part of their lives better.

The particular field of one-on-one coaching has grown exponentially since the beginning of the recession in 2007.

Miami's Dan Silverman grew his coaching business out of something he was doing free at bars all over South Florida.

Karen Rundlet / Miami Herald

The number of microbreweries in South Florida could triple by the end of 2015. More brewers are well on their way to setting up shop locally, and from a business perspective, it’s about time: Craft beer has been popular in the U.S. since the mid ‘90s. Brewers know South Floridians have a taste for it and they’re excited to bring their flavorful suds to underserved local customers. But it’s not just brewers who recognize these specialty brews as good business.

Karen Rundlet / Miami Herald


Florida’s southernmost winery is located in the heart of Miami Dade’s farm country, Redland. It’s called Schnebly Redland’s Winery and it’s been up and running over a decade. For me, the trip to Schnebly Redland’s Winery meant a couple of hours in the car, heading south on U.S. 1, with a view of Miami Dade slowing down.

courtesy Ronald Herbas

Last fall, an innovation training program called StartupQuest launched in South Florida. Full time employees were not welcome. It was specifically for folks who were out of work or underemployed.

The goal of the program was to help people get new technology skills -- and jobs.

When you hear the words "technology" or "innovation," you might picture a kid, in a hoodie, coding all night at a computer. But in this program, the average age of participants was 51, and almost everyone had a master’s degree and decades of experience.

Courtesy of Girls Who Code

There’s an enormous push in South Florida right now to grab more of the innovation economy, but we’re not the only region making a play for this sector. The competition nationally is fierce. Cities like St. Louis, Charlotte, and Phoenix have made bigger strides when it comes to growing as tech hubs

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

  Binsen Gonzalez almost left Miami, but he received funding for his idea just in time.

“I was about to leave for San Francisco because I felt like there wasn’t something right for me. And then one of my mentors was like if you don’t see it, make it happen.”

That mentor happened to be former Mayor Manny Diaz. The Knight Foundation awarded Gonzalez a $75,000 grant last week for his digital civic start-up idea called Our City Thoughts.

South Africa The Good News / Wikimedia Commons

  It was the summer of 1990. I was home, living with my parents, working part-time at a Miami television station as a production assistant. I made an aspiring journalist’s wage, $6 an hour.

A multiracial group of students back at my Washington, D.C., college had staged sit-ins calling for the school to divest from South Africa. I remember campus-wide "reverse apartheid" protest days. We were learning about modern-day, systemic racial segregation.

But in 1990, Nelson Mandela, who'd spent 27 years as a political prisoner, was released.


  The legal profession is going through a bit of an existential crisis and certainly an economic one. Large law firms that 10 years ago would have been expected to survive any financial crisis are reacting to a new, constricting marketplace with staff reductions and requests for capital contributions from partners. Host Karen Rundlet talks with Greenberg Traurig's Brad Kaufman about new opportunities for hiring and partnership in today's legal environment.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

Structural engineers don't necessarily view rising sea levels as certain disaster. By definition, it's the job of the engineer to solve design and construction problems caused by environmental changes.

Business journalist Karen Rundlet examines some proposed solutions for sea-level rise. She interviews the University of Miami's Dr. Antonio Nanni about embracing some unusual possibilities. Click play to hear the interview.

Karen Rundlet

The store you probably spend the most time in isn’t a boutique or a department store. I’ll bet, over the course of a year, it’s the supermarket. 

On average, supermarket customers shop for groceries twice a week and spend about $100. In South Florida, Publix is the marketshare leader – dominating with close to 250 stores. Winn Dixie is second. And then, we have Walmart and Sedano’s.

While each chain is distinct in terms of pricing and store environment, there are commonalities in how many of them are designed, said Paco Underhill, a consultant and author who studies the science of how people shop all over the world.