Julio Ochoa

Julio Ochoa is editor of Health News Florida.

He comes to WUSF from The Tampa Tribune, where he began as a website producer for TBO.com and served in several editing roles, eventually becoming the newspaper’s deputy metro editor. 

Julio was born and raised in St. Petersburg, and received a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and worked at a paper in Greeley, Colo., before returning to Florida as a reporter and as breaking news editor for the Naples Daily News.

Contact Julio at 813-974-8633, on Twitter at @julioochoa or email julioochoa@wusf.org.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Tuesday that the state has filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors, blaming the companies for creating the crisis which kills about 15 Floridians a day.

Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital has a reputation as being one of the best children’s hospitals in Florida.

The state’s invalidated process for licensing new methadone clinics is delaying help for opioid addicts in rural communities.

A New Port Richey man was sentenced to 15 years in prison for a pharmacy scheme that involved $100 million in health insurance fraud.

Pain management physicians had a role in creating the opioid crisis and some of those doctors are now working to solve the problem.

Florida will get another $27 million dollars this year from the federal government to combat the opioid crisis.

A national study released Tuesday provides a state-by-state look at life expectancy and the factors that are killing Floridians, and as one might expect, opioid abuse is near the top of the list.

It came down to the wire, but a federal agency that helps thousands of Florida seniors sign up for Medicare will be funded for another year.

From opioid prescription limits to an agreement on the regulation of trauma centers, it was a busy year for health care issues in the Florida Legislature.

Proposed changes to Florida’s Medicaid eligibility requirements would make it harder for people to get coverage after they become sick.

The same company that designed a pedestrian bridge that collapsed in Miami also designed the Sunshine Skyway Bridge and the elevated portion of the Selmon Expressway in Tampa.

A bill approved by the Florida Legislature would end HCA’s bid to open a trauma center at Northside Hospital in St. Petersburg.

A program that helps thousands of Florida seniors sign up for Medicare could lose all of its funding by the end of the month if Congress doesn't act.

Florida legislators passed a bill this week that would make first responders eligible for workers compensation if they are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

The high school shooting in Parkland is sparking a lot of questions from children who are wondering if something similar could happen at their school.

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