Jim Ash

Jim Ash is a reporter at WFSU-FM.  A Miami native, he is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience, most of it in print.  He has been a member of the Florida Capital Press Corps since 1992.

Ash has worked variously as a reporter, columnist and bureau chief.  His specialties include state politics, the judicial system and the environment.  His career has included coverage of everything from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster and Hurricane Andrew to the Florida presidential recount.

Ash is a graduate of the University of Iowa where he earned a degree in English.  He spent his summers interning for newspapers, including the Austin-American Statesman in Texas.

A hiking enthusiast, Ash has explored most of the public trails in California's Big Sur.  He is an avid reader who enjoys traveling, exploring the Big Bend, and water sports.

It may be hard to pronounce, but medication synchronization is an idea whose time has come, at least according to some Florida lawmakers.

By scaling back the cost and size of a proposed reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee, Senate President Joe Negron appears to be making progress with critics. But a deal seems far from certain.

The fate of a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing appears sealed now that a powerful Republican is calling it quits.

After winning big at the ballot box in November, solar energy supporters are worried a House proposal could dim the victory.

A House panel voted Thursday to put a measure on the ballot that would give the Legislature the power to impeach state attorneys and public defenders.  As Jim Ash reports, Republican Jackie Toledo of Tampa thinks those public servants need another layer of oversight.

A strongly divided Florida Supreme Court upheld Florida’s ban on openly carrying firearms.

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum is making it official with a social media post -- he's running for governor.

A war of words between two of Florida’s most powerful Republicans is heating up in a Leon County Circuit Court.

The Florida House is moving closer to keeping Speaker Richard Corcoran’s promise to crack down on public corruption – at least at the local level.

The issue of hydraulic fracturing has long been highly controversial in Florida, and now it’s opening up a fissure in the Republican-led Senate. There are competing fracking bills, and the chamber's leader is staying mum on where he stands.

Republican Representative Jason Brodeur of Sanford wants to get rid of a few more speed bumps he thinks are slowing the development of driverless cars.

Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater’s surprise departure from the Florida Cabinet is setting off a whirlwind of speculation about his replacement.

A bill preventing local governments from regulating what sponsors are calling transportation network companies is moving in the House, with major backers Uber and Lyft confident it will pass.

Wildlife managers are hoping the proliferation of cell phone cameras will translate to better protections for the endangered Florida panther.

A Miami appeals court is siding with Governor Rick Scott and San Francisco-based technology giant Uber in a dispute over the status of part-time drivers. 

The Third District Court of Appeals in Miami has decided Uber drivers are independent contractors and not employees and therefore not eligible for unemployment benefits.

The ruling cites a standard Uber contract requiring drivers to acknowledge that they are independent contractors. The driver argued Uber controls almost every aspect of his performance and had the right to fire him.

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