David Kestenbaum

David Kestenbaum is a correspondent for NPR, covering science, energy issues and, most recently, the global economy for NPR's multimedia project Planet Money. David has been a science correspondent for NPR since 1999. He came to journalism the usual way — by getting a Ph.D. in physics first.

In his years at NPR, David has covered science's discoveries and its darker side, including the Northeast blackout, the anthrax attacks and the collapse of the New Orleans levees. He has also reported on energy issues, particularly nuclear and climate change.

David has won awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

David worked briefly on the show This American Life, and set up a radio journalism program in Cambodia on a Fulbright fellowship. He also teaches a journalism class at Johns Hopkins University.

David holds a bachelor's of science degree in physics from Yale University and a doctorate in physics from Harvard University.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Now we have the story of information you get from your doctor as well as information you do not. DAVID GREENE, HOST: A good doctor is a source of information. You can ask what might be causing a bump on your wrist or whether you can take one medication with another one. INSKEEP: Yet, the doctor often will not know the answer to a really basic question, a question you'd ask in almost any other...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Plumbing is one of those things you don't really think about until it breaks. In Greece right now, the financial plumbing is being made painfully visible. David Kestenbaum, of our Planet Money team, says it's a lesson in the hidden things that keep an economy together. DAVID KESTENBAUM, BYLINE: About a week and a half ago, Miltiades Gkouzouris was driving home with his family to Athens when the news...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: As if they didn't have enough, casinos are always looking for new ways to make money. Now, rather than focusing on traditional games of chance like roulette or slot machines, they're toying with new games based on skill. David Kestenbaum of NPR's Planet Money podcast went to Atlantic City to play. DAVID KESTENBAUM, BYLINE: The game was a simple one - throw a ball through a ring 10 feet off the ground 15...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: The U.S. government wants to extradite a stock trader from the U.K. The U.S. says his activities helped trigger the flash crash of 2010. That's when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly a thousand points in mere minutes. The plunge was sudden and deep because so many stock trades are now done by computers that decide on their own to buy or sell. That reminded us of someone we first met a few...

The online furniture company Wayfair is now one of the most shorted stocks. Our Planet Money team talks to its CEO about what it's like to be running a company when some investors are betting on your fall. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Our Planet Money team has been looking into the world of short selling. Shorting a stock is the opposite of buying a stock. It's a bet that the stock will drop in value. In previous stories, we...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Today is April 1, a day when you are likely to hear - if you haven't already - many bad jokes. In that tradition, we bring you this from our Planet Money team - a particular category of bad joke, one that deals with economics. NPR's Robert Smith and David Kestenbaum scoured the world for the best economics jokes and tried them out on stage. ROBERT SMITH, BYLINE: David, I have always wanted to do...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, BYLINE: There is a high-stakes international battle going on right now. On one side is Greece, on the other side, basically the rest of Europe. Greece is trying to renegotiate the bailout deal it agreed to after the financial crisis. There have been high-level meetings, lots of back and forth, temporary extensions. In the middle of this is an unusual man, Greece's new finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: On January 1, 20 states raise their minimum wage and several states have additional increases planned in the coming months. Yesterday, we learned that Walmart will raise its base pay to $9 an hour this April. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: All this movement on the minimum reminded us of a story that aired on Morning Edition last year. It was from David Kestenbaum from our NPR's Planet Money team. He took us back...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Our Planet Money team is exploring the world of short selling. Shorting a stock is the opposite of buying a stock. Instead of profiting when the company does well, you make money if the stock price drops. On Morning Edition today, our Planet Money team shorted the entire stock market just for fun to see what it was like. And now they bring us a story from long ago of the very first person to short a...

College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300. And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even health care. But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact, the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time. How is this possible? Well, when prices go up, people usually try to...

The 1964 World's Fair showcased jet packs and new miracles of science. There was an entire house made of Formica. You could wipe it clean with a sponge! The people who put the fair together tried to imagine how the future would look. Here are a few predictions, and how they actually turned out. 1. We had picture phones back then? Vito Turso was at the fair when he used one of the first picture phones . Back then, he was a boy selling pizza at the fair. He says the...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Milk is one of the most popular items in a supermarket. And yet, it is often found at the very back of the store. One theory is that stores want you to walk further through the aisles so you'll buy more stuff. But there's another explanation that's more innocent. David Kestenbaum with our Planet Money team tried to find out which is right. DAVID KESTENBAUM, BYLINE: To lay out the two theories, we have...

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