Christine DiMattei


Years ago, after racking her brains trying to find a fun, engaging, creative nighttime gig to subsidize her acting habit, Chris decided to ride her commercial voiceover experience into the fast-paced world of radio broadcasting. She started out with traffic reporting, moved on to news . . . and never looked back. Since then, Chris has worked in newsrooms throughout South Florida, producing stories for radio broadcasts and the web.

In her other life, she has been married to 12 husbands (including a not-so-wild boar and a garden slug), given birth to 15 children, died four times, twice taken vows as a nun and once been abducted by pirates in the Caribbean. And all this by doing English language dubbing for dozens of foreign films, soap operas and cartoons.  Both lives, she says, have been "a most excellent adventure."

Ways to Connect

Miami-Dade County

For months, health officials have been pleading with South Floridians to “drain and cover” --  especially people who live in Miami Beach, Miami-Dade’s remaining zika virus hot zone. And now the county has reported a case of locally-acquired dengue fever – another mosquito-borne virus.

Dansar / flickr

Burmese pythons, lionfish, african land snails -- these are just a few of the invasive species considered threats to Florida ecosystems. And the fact that you really can't snuggle with serpent, a venomous fish or a disease-carrying mollusk perhaps makes them easier to eradicate.

But what does Florida do about a potential invader that's a little on the cute side?

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

You've been warned.
This is not a common story. This is a story that begins at night.
Many children are afraid of the night because
they think that when it is all dark, monsters and ghosts appear.
But that is not true.
The night is the night and nothing else.
The night is just the other side of the day.

Logan Riely, TNS

It’s banned in Europe.

Puerto Ricans took to the streets to keep it off their island.

But a controversial pesticide is being aerial-sprayed over a Miami-Dade Zika hot zone in a race to kill the virus-carrying aedes aegypti mosquito. And its use is raising concerns about possible health risks posed by long-term exposure to the chemical.

Below, Miami Herald reporter Andres Viglucci answers some questions about the pesticide called Naled.

What is Naled?

Nevermore Production Films

If you're going to craft a good horror story, a gloomy climate almost always helps. The Overlook Hotel in The Shining probably wouldn't be as scary without that isolating snow storm. Nor would Edgar Allen Poe's House of Usher seem as foreboding surrounded by palm trees inside of all the miasmic fog.

So can a top-notch horror movie ever be set in sunny South Florida?

On Stage Black Box Theater

As far back as 1899, Russian playwright Anton Chekhov worried about the environment and the effect that industrialization and its attendant pollution would have on the natural world. He covered that theme and more -- lost love, the wasted life, alienation -- in his play, "Uncle Vanya."

And now, under the direction of playwright Nilo Cruz, the Spanish-language version of the play comes to the Miami-Dade Auditorium's Black Box Theater  as "Tio Vania."

C. DiMattei

First, ergonomic chairs were a must-have when it came to workplace wellness. Then, standing desks were all the rage.

Could “walking meetings” follow?

A new University of Miami study suggests that swapping out a seated meeting just once a week for what TV screenwriters call “the walk and talk” could be a boon to worker health and well-being.

Over a three-week period, study participants -- white-collar workers -- wore accelerometers to measure their physical activity.

Terry Spencer, Associated Press

How would you like to pack up the cooler and head to your favorite Florida beach -- only to find the ocean water covered with foul-smelling, guacamole-thick fluorescent green gunk?  

That's what many Treasure Coast year-round residents and tourists are dealing with.  The blue-green algae spread is so bad that Gov. Rick Scott last week declared a state of emergency in four Florida counties -- including Palm Beach County.  


"Down By The Old Mill Stream"?  Not likely.

"Wait 'Til The Sun Shines, Nellie"?  Nope.

"Let Me Call You Sweetheart"?  Don't even think about it.

The four members of Signature are going into an upcoming barbershop quartet singing competition with their rendition of Queen's "Somebody To Love."

"Yeah.  That's a monster!" says tenor Will Rodriguez with a laugh.  "Any time you sing Freddie Mercury . . ." The  31-year-old stops himself at the mention of the rock frontman, who reputedly had a four-octave singing range.

Miami Beach Police Department

As law enforcement agencies try to piece together  what happened Sunday morning at a gay nightclub in Orlando, when at least 50 people were gunned down, many in South Florida wonder about security and how to protect themselves and those they love from similar attacks. 

  "Every time there is a pride event, there is that fear that exists, especially since we have seen the passage of marriage equality," says Cindy Brown, Miami-Dade development officer for Equality Florida, the largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group in the state. 


Colorado State University


The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is here and for the first time in decades South Florida will have to get through it without a man who was a pioneer in hurricane research. Dr. Bill Gray of Colorado State University (CSU) died in April. He's perhaps best known for his data-driven seasonal hurricane forecasts, which have been used for over 30 years.

WLRN talked to Dr. Phil Klotzbach, who started out as Dr. Gray's protegé and eventually became the other half of CSU’s hurricane forecast dynamic duo.

Logan Fazio

On a scorcher of a day at the beach, there's almost nothing like reaching into your cooler or a beach bag and taking a swig out of an ice cold water bottle.

But if they're plastic, all those little bottles add up.

It's estimated that 60 million plastic bottles are used in the United States every day, with many of them going unrecycled and ending up in landfills and in the ocean. But in Miami-Dade, a non-profit is enlisting the help of some old-fashioned technology in the fight against plastic waste: the water fountain.

Samuel Goldwyn Films

In 1959, there was a certain sport in Cuba that the newly triumphant Castro regime declared "elitist" and "dangerous."

Consequently, car racing was outlawed.

But now a new documentary examines Cuba's underground auto racing culture and the renaissance of the forbidden sport.

“Havana Motor Club,” opening April 8 at Miami Beach’s O Cinema, follows the attempts of a group of racing fans trying to organize the first government-sanctioned race in Cuba in more than 50 years.

Miami Light Project

Have you got a great idea that could change the face of arts in South Florida?

Then it's time to submit it to the Knight Arts Challenge MiamiThe yearly challenge looks for the best and most innovative ideas aimed at bringing South Florida residents together through the arts. Winners will share $2.5 million dollars in grants. 

There are only three rules for submissions:

H. Tookes

New cases of the virus that causes AIDS are becoming less frequent throughout the United States.

But not in Florida.

Statewide, HIV infections have been increasing in recent years, with Miami-Dade and Broward counties topping the list. But a new law might help stem the tide of those new cases. For the first time, Florida has a needle-exchange program for intravenous drug users.