Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media.

Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction.

Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Michael Tilson Thomas, Dawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power.

She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has also written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch.

Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She was a 2013 USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. In 2013, she won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the 2013 Third Coast International Audio Festival, sometimes referred to as "the Sundance of radio."

Ways to Connect

South Florida Stories, In 6 Words

Nov 16, 2016
Katie Lepri / WLRN

Would you be able to encapsulate all the wonders/horrors/comedy/tragedy of living in South Florida in just six words? 

Well, that's precisely what we asked our audience to do in the #6WordsMiami project, our latest collaboration with the Miami Book Fair.

Family of Larry Rosen

Larry Rosen was always looking for his next big project. A decade ago, he'd recently finished producing a series for PBS, "Legends of Jazz with Ramsey Lewis," but he was not a guy interested in taking a break. The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts was new and, as usual, Rosen saw an opportunity: bring jazz to the gleaming new concert hall, one with acoustics that could be adjusted to different kinds of music. 

David Bornfriend / Courtesy of A24

When director Barry Jenkins was looking for ideas for a new film, his friends at the Borsht Film Festival thought of the work of another Miami native, the playwright  (and MacArthur Genius) Tarell Alvin McCraney.

David G. Zuckerman

This morning, I woke up to vindication. It came in the form of a news alert on my phone telling me that Bob Dylan is now a Nobel Prize winner in literature. Not that I needed vindication so many years after the incident at my high school graduation. OK, maybe I did because I immediately wondered if the early 1990s-era administration of Minisink Valley High School in New York State got the same alert.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Dance Now Miami performs Edward Stierle's "Lacrymosa," Thursday, May 19th through Sunday, May 21st at the Fillmore Miami Beach. The ballet was a response to the 1980 AIDS crisis and stands as its creator's own requiem. 

People told Edward Stierle he was too short for ballet. He was around 5'6" or 5'8", depending on who you ask. He'd been dancing tap and jazz since he was four or five years old, with his big sister Rosemarie teaching his first classes. But he had a calling for ballet. 

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Judy Blume's latest book, “In the Unlikely Event,” came out in paperback this week. So we're bringing back this hour, which we produced when the book first came out last year. 

Siggi Bachmann

There was a time in the life of New World Symphony co-founder and artistic director Michael Tilson Thomas when he was at a crossroads. He was in his late twenties and early thirties and finding a lot of success as an emerging conductor. He had been assistant conductor with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, then principal guest conductor. He was conducting other orchestras all around the world.

rrjones

The Cleveland Orchestra is performing the world premiere of Avner Dorman's "Siklòn," inspired by the mélange of Miami cultures and the way this place reminds the Israeli composer of Tel Aviv. The piece was commissioned to mark the 10th anniversary of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts and its 10-year partnership with the Cleveland Orchestra.

In this edition of Spark, recorded at the Miami Book Fair, Eric Bogosian recounts how he recently asked if wife if they could play with crayons. He remembers how he felt the first time he read lines in a play (Shakespeare; he says it was "painful" but in a good way).

In this edition of Spark, the poet Richard Blanco talks about how crazy he was about Legos. He talks about getting called a "sissy" by his grandmother and why he thinks he got the same score on the math and verbal sections of the SAT.  He talks about discovering poetry because of a girlfriend (before he came out), the first poem he fell in love with and how being an engineer makes him a better poet. He also talks about cat litter. And he tries to imagine what it might be like not to be Cuban American. Tries. 

The composer John Luther Adams calls himself "deeply, deeply Alaskan." That's where the 62-year-old lived almost his entire adult life, and he still has his cabin in the woods where he's written so much of his music. But now he and his wife split their time between an apartment in New York City and a house in Mexico right next to the Pacific Ocean.

Ben Kushner

For a while in the late 1980s, Jeff Schmalz was the Miami bureau chief for the New York Times. That was before he was completely out of the closet, and Miami was one of the places in the country where he felt comfortable as a gay man.

Richard Blanco's poem for President Obama's second inauguration, "One Today," just came out as a children's book, with illustrations by Captain Underpants creator Dav Pilkey (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers).

Blanco is a poet and a civil engineer and says in the right brain/left brain equation, he uses both sides in equal measure. He recently spent some time with us talking about his own childhood. 

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Hedy Goldsmith is the mastermind behind rich-and-salty chocolate chunk cookies, coconut lime macarons and praline panna cotta.

Until last month, she was the executive pastry chef with the Genuine Hospitality Group, which includes Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink and Harry’s Pizzeria (where you can still find the biscotti-of-the-day), among other Michael Schwartz restaurants.

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