Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media.

At WLRN, she's in charge of planning and editing feature stories, enterprise and other long-form radio. She's also a contributor to Sundial on WLRN.  

Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction.

Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Judy Blume, Bill T. Jones, Wallace Shawn, Michael Tilson Thomas, Shepard FaireyDawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power.

She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch.

Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She was a USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. She has won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the Third Coast International Audio Festival, sometimes referred to as "the Sundance of radio." She edited WLRN's  series on surviving gun violence and edited and co-hosted WLRN's documentary, Cell 1: Florida's Death Penalty in Limbo

Ways to Connect

Paul Kolnik

Seeing Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for the first time is a rite of passage for anyone who loves dance (and for plenty of people who didn't know they did). Jamar Roberts first saw the company perform in Fort Lauderdale when he was a kid growing up in South Dade.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Judy Blume turns 80 today (February 12), and she celebrated all day yesterday at the nonprofit bookstore she and her husband George run in Key West. It was hard to keep track of how many fans who showed up called her their "childhood hero" (present company included). 

Blume works four days a week at the Books & Books at The Studios of Key West, including all day every Sunday.

Paul B. Goode

Update: The scheduled performance by Bill T. Jones at the Arsht Center has been canceled because of weather.

A few years ago, Bill T. Jones thought there was a good chance his nephew Lance was going to die. He was so sick. Bill T. Jones is hugely influential — as a choreographer and dancer, a writer and thinker — and when he thought his nephew was dying, he wanted to make sure his story stayed in the world. 

Gesi Schilling / O, Miami Poetry Festival

Food is such a part of how we relate to where we're from, where we live, our heritage and our discoveries along the way. Earlier this year, we asked you to send us your Edible Odes, poems about the food in your life, for our annual project with the O, Miami Poetry Festival.  (Portion size: 4o words or fewer.)

Teresa Frontado / WLRN News

In Syria, gardens have been transformed into graveyards where protesters killed during the uprising against the Assad regime are buried. Lebanese-British artist Tania El Khoury imagined that "if we press our ear to the ground, we are able to hear these stories." 

Hummingbird Films

The women from the novel A Thousand Splendid Suns first came alive on stage in Key West, in a workshop version of the opera's first act. 

Eric Smith

Irene Williams spent roughly 40 years walking most of the length of Lincoln Road, from her apartment at Michigan Avenue to the office where she worked as a stenographer in the Lincoln Building at Washington Avenue. She was a vision in so many bright colors and loud patterns in clothes she made herself. Irene Williams was someone you noticed. 

Twenty-five years ago, in those harrowing days and weeks after Hurricane Andrew, people were trying to figure out how to cope with the destruction and trauma that the storm left behind. One of the ways they did that was by recording songs and sending them to TV meteorologist Bryan Norcross.

Courtesy of ruthbehar.com

A few years after Ruth Behar and her family arrived in Queens, New York from Cuba in the early 1960's shortly after Fidel Castro took power, they were in an awful car accident that killed five teenage boys and left her in a full-body cast for most of the next year. She was nine years old, and spent her 10th birthday in that cast. 

Simon Cocks / flickr

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads .

Pablo Cartaya, author of The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora

Grove Atlantic

Patricia Engel has the extremely familiar story of having come to Miami for what she thought would be a year -- 13 years ago.

Daniel Azoulay / Miami City Ballet

Patricia Delgado was 11 years old the first time she walked into the Miami City Ballet studios to take class. Her sister Jeanette was nine.

Pat Farrell for Knight Foundation

 

 


Alex Markow Photography

Sam Hyken and Jacomo Bairos first got turned on to Frank Zappa not from classic albums like "Weasels Ripped My Flesh" or "Shut Up 'N Play Yer Guitar," but by playing his orchestral music when they were students at Juilliard (at different times).

Long before Joshua Johnson was on the air as a reporter here at WLRN during the early days of our partnership with the Miami Herald, he'd spend his Friday afternoons on the Jack Cole Show on WJNO in West Palm Beach, where Johnson grew up. He was 14 then, and he knew right away that radio was what he wanted to do.

This month, Johnson took over the microphone where Diane Rehm left off, with his new national show 1A from NPR and WAMU in Washington, DC. On WLRN, it airs every weekday at 10 a.m.

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