Alexander Gonzalez

Associate Producer

Alexander Gonzalez produces the afternoon newscasts airing during All Things Considered. He enjoys helping tell the South Florida story through audio and digital platforms. Alex is interested in a little of everything from business to culture to politics.

 

A Miami native, Alex has been in the journalism game since high school. He was editor of his high school and college newspapers. After graduating from the University of Miami, he first arrived at WLRN as the summer 2015 digital intern. He reported on Latin American communities in Miami, the city’s burgeoning arts culture, and a grassroots group of mango collectors.

 

Before returning to Miami, Alex lived in New York, where he earned his master’s in journalism from NYU. In between, he also spent a year teaching English in France on a Fulbright grant.

 

In his spare time, Alex looks for discount books and listens to podcasts – his favorites include “Death, Sex & Money,” “Spooked” and “99% Invisible.”

Kim Jong Un
KRT via AP Video

President Donald Trump came to Miami one year ago, on June 16, 2017, to announce he was rolling back some of the Obama-era changes in America’s Cuban policy. In doing so, Trump went after the communist dictatorship on the island.

 

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

The threat of sea-level rise stretches well beyond the coastline.

Courtesy of Harry Castiblanco

Since January, the Teatro Trail in Little Havana has been showing the play, “Tres Viudas en un Crucero” (“Three Widows on a Cruise”), to sold-out crowds. The Spanish-language production featured a blackface character. A fair-skinned actress wore brown face makeup and overdrawn big red lips.

 

The theater recently decided to eliminate blackface from the play after an El Nuevo Herald report denouncing it. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The lull lasted more than a decade. A major storm hadn’t made landfall in South Florida since the 2004-2005 double-hitter of Hurricanes Wilma and Katrina.

That record ended this past September when Hurricane Irma rocked the region and much of the Caribbean.

The Category 5 storm first made landfall in Barbuda with maximum winds of nearly 180 mph. The hurricane then ripped through St. Martin, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas and Cuba.

Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Ernesto Rodriguez, spokesperson for Miami Beach Police, says authorities will approach Memorial Day weekend "like a stadium."

Triple Five

Derek Cintron has lived most of his life in Miami Lakes. He says he loved the area so much that he decided to buy a house there five years ago.

Now Cintron is considering a move. He lives 10 minutes away from the site of the future American Dream Miami, the $4 billion retail theme park the county voted Thursday to approve. It would be the largest mall in North America at 6.2 million square feet – big enough to house an artificial ski slope and submarine rides.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The threat of sea level rise affects all of South Florida – from the ocean to the Everglades. The sea has risen nine inches in the past century. It’s predicted to rise another two feet in less than half that time.

 

Evidence of the higher seas can be seen around the region – including increased flooding, raising roads, flood pumps and encroaching saltwater.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Antwan Johnson, a guard at the Miami-Dade Regional Juvenile Detention Center, was arrested as he was getting ready to go to work Monday morning.

 

A grand jury charged Johnson with encouraging inmates to beat up other inmates, including 17-year-old Elord Revolte. He died in 2015 when more than a dozen detainees jumped him – allegedly urged by Johnson.

Harrison School for the Arts

Floridians have mythologized Publix. The supermarket is celebrated for its Pub Subs, chicken tenders, sappy commercials and catchy slogans.

Public domain

Commuting in South Florida apparently takes herculean patience and resilience to bouts of “traffic trauma.”

 

ApartmentList.com released a report showing a share of commuters in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties travel at least 90 minutes to get to work. South Florida joins a national trend – dubbed a “supercommute” – that’s plaguing other cities, including New York and Washington, D.C.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Several South Florida nonprofits are launching five meetings to ensure equality in hurricane recovery efforts, continuing work that began after Hurricane Irma.

John Power / WLRN

The rhythms of  the Spanish language have contributed a lot to the sound of South Florida, where more than two million people speak the language. Immigrants from Colombia to Cuba to Venezuela have made vale and dale part of the region’s everyday talk.

Note: This story first ran last summer. The group Mangoes to Share is back at it this summer, and they say they've been scheduling "non-stop" pickups.  Organizer Anna Milaeva tells us the owner of one vacant lot has given them carte blanche to pick mangoes from 30 trees on the property. They've been picking other fruit too, like star fruit, lychees and avocados.

Courtesy / Fringe Projects Miami

When Emile Milgrim left Miami for Oregon in 2003, she recalls a different kind of city.

“There weren’t a lot of people living in downtown Miami, Midtown, Little Haiti, North Miami, MiMo, whatever you want to call that stuff,” she says. “And then now there are, so it looks and sounds different.”

Tiffany Madera / Courtesy

 

They call themselves ABCs: American-born Cubans. Well before Cuba and the United States began to normalize relations this year, a crop of younger Cuban-Americans were working to engage the communist island.

Many Gen. X-ers, in particular, have challenged their parents and communities' wishes in an attempt to lift what some artists and writers have been calling the “emotional embargo” on Cubans on and off the island. 

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