Stoneman

The grief and mourning continue for the 17 students and staff killed on the afternoon of Feb. 14 during a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. But something else is happening among the anguish of the interrupted lives of the victims and survivors. Out of the agony, activism has emerged and students from across South Florida are speaking out together asking for stricter gun controls.

Here's a list of grief counseling resources available for the community

Two students who survived the Florida school shooting and spoke publicly about it are not "crisis actors," despite the claims of several conspiracy-oriented sites and an aide to a Florida lawmaker.

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Just over a week after 17 people were killed at Parkland, Fla., high school, National Rifle Association executive vice president and CEO Wayne LaPierre gave a fiery, defiant speech at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, on Thursday at the National Harbor in Maryland. LaPierre defended Second Amendment rights and warned of a "socialist agenda" intended to strip firearms away from law-abiding citizens.

Threats of violence against schools have been reported all across Florida since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, on Feb. 14.

The spike of threats in Florida seems to be in line with a national trend reported by the Educators School Safety Network, which says it recorded about 50 threats a day on average since the shooting at Parkland. The usual number, according to the organization, is about 10 threats a day on average.

To help fund a national gun-control movement, a small group of South Florida students who survived the worst high school shooting in U.S. history set up a modest website Sunday and created a GoFundMe account to pursue an ambitious goal: raise $1 million.

They’ve received more than three times that amount. In four days.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Hundreds of people gathered in Parkland Wednesday to remember 17-year-old Nick Dworet.

He was one of the 17 people killed by a shooter at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day.

  

Nick loved music. It played Wednesday at Parkland Country Club as friends, family and coaches took turns remembering him.

The handsome teenager who loved Oreos. The joyful nephew. The champion swimmer. The hopeless romantic.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

A group of elementary school students opened Broward County’s first school board meeting since last week’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting by reciting the pledge of allegiance and singing the national anthem.

The kids were in their classroom at Griffin Elementary School in Cooper City, but they appeared via livestream video. They weren’t there to see how their performance was received, how poignant it seemed, as their community mourned 14 other children and three staff members who were slaughtered in the Valentine’s Day mass shooting.

Courtesy of Olivia Osterman

Students around South Florida participated in classroom walkouts one week after the mass school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Fl.

The walkouts were to begin at noon and last 17 minutes, one minute for each life lost in last week's shooting. Organizers called them an act of compassion for the lives lost and to make a statement about the need for gun law reform. 

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