Environment

In South Florida, where the Everglades meet the bays, environmental challenges abound. Sea level rise threatens homes and real estate. Invasive species imperil native plants and animals. Pesticides reduce the risk of mosquito-borne diseases, but at what cost? 

WLRN's award-winning environment reporting strives to capture the color and complexity of human interaction with one of the most biodiverse areas of the planet.

Patricia Sagastume

The whitewall rubber tires, which until recently had been on the bottom of the ocean floor off the coast of Broward County, now look like deflated, salt-encrusted life preservers, and reek of the decayed smell of barnacles mixed with sea spray.

They are the stars of an art exhibit called “The Eclipse,” open now in Miami’s Wynwood district, a tribute to a failed plan to create an artificial reef and mankind’s attempts to remove the tires and save the ocean from even more destruction.

Readers Share Green Flash Photos

Sep 1, 2011
Kerry Maxwell

Under the Sun recently ran a piece on green flashes – a green light that appears in the sky for a fleeting moment when the sun dips below the horizon. Many believe the green flash to be a myth, but it actually has a scientific explanation: refraction. We asked readers if they had ever seen a green flash. Many sent us stories and pictures of their experience with the atmospheric phenomenon.

KERRY MAXWELL

Songs Of Seduction Under The Sea

Sep 1, 2011

Here in South Florida we’re used to hearing all kinds of birds sing. But how often do you hear fish sing? It turns out that fish sing when they are ready to mate. Dan Grech set out on a pontoon boat in Stuart, about two hours north of Miami, to hear this unique mating call.

Patrick Meyers / Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Studies

Have you ever seen a green flash? It is said to happen as the sun dips below the horizon, creating an elusive green light that appears in the sky for a fleeting moment and then disappears. Many people believe the green flash is a myth, repeated for the benefit of tourists. Others swear by its existence. So is it real? If so, what causes it? Under the Sun reporter Sammy Mack – a skeptic when it comes to the green flash – headed to Key West to investigate this phenomenon.

Sammy Mack

Journalist Frank Deford spends every winter in Key West with his wife. They rent a house, take long walks and breathe in the island air. Under the Sun producer Sammy Mack listens to Deford marvel at the view from his front porch, a relic of a bygone era. He loves the lushness of the island, so green and beautiful. To him, Key West is soft and peaceful. But above all, it is a warm escape.

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