Environment

In South Florida, where the Everglades meet the bays, environmental challenges abound. Sea level rise threatens homes and real estate. Invasive species imperil native plants and animals. Pesticides reduce the risk of mosquito-borne diseases, but at what cost? 

WLRN's award-winning environment reporting strives to capture the color and complexity of human interaction with one of the most biodiverse areas of the planet.

An outbreak of red tide is killing fish off the southwest Florida coast.

Scott Vetoes Aquifer Bill, Signs 17 Others

Apr 9, 2018

Wrapping up work from the 2018 legislative session, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed 17 bills and vetoed one measure, which he said could “muddle” Florida’s efforts to protect its underground water system.

Zack Ransom / Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science

Divers from a Key Largo environmental group and a Miami science museum removed an orangespine unicornfish from a reef off the Upper Keys this week.

The underwater rapid response team was put together to prevent another exotic species like lionfish from getting a finhold in South Florida waters. Unicornfish are popular in the saltwater aquarium trade, and are native to the tropical Pacific.

Wikimedia Commons

It's a good weekend to learn about rivers in South Florida.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

An ugly moment at a meeting of Miami's sea-level rise committee last week has prompted controversy over one of its members and a discussion over the committee's mission.

The Trump Administration today moved to weaken fuel economy standards for automobiles, saying the current ones are inappropriate and wrong.

The long-anticipated move is a win for auto manufacturers, which had lobbied for lower fuel-economy standards. It's also a rejection of one of former President Barack Obama's biggest efforts to combat climate change by curbing greenhouse gas emissions.

Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald Archive

The record rain that pounded South Florida last year and left the state a sodden mess had a silver lining: an explosion of wading birds.

Florida beachgoers often imagine a day on the water. Colorful umbrellas peppered across the sand, the sound of waves foaming as they crash onto the shore and the inescapable smell of saltwater nipping at your senses.

Sometimes, instead of this picturesque scene, a sickening odor of dead fish wafts across empty beaches, local restaurants are closed because they can’t prepare seafood, and residents even experience trouble breathing. The culprit is red tide.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Palm Beach County sugarcane growers have a new use for their crop: tableware.

Tellus Products’s new state-of-the-art facility in Belle Glade uses leftover sugarcane fiber, or bagasse, to produce biodegradable plates, bowls and take-out containers.

Gov. Rick Scott cut the ribbon on the 120,000-square-foot facility at a ceremony Tuesday.

Lieutenant Elizabeth Crapo, NOAA Corps / via Wikimedia Commons

South Florida’s future looks wet, salty and, unless you’re a mermaid, maybe a bit apocalyptic.

Michal Kranz / WLRN

An event at Biscayne National Park this weekend celebrates water -- and storytellers who want to make a splash.

As part of its 50th anniversary, the park is hosting a storytelling contest. Before a live audience and a panel of judges, participants will tell short, real-life stories that include water -- sparkling or still, salty or fresh.

The event is open to the public and will take place 7 p.m. Saturday outside the park's Dante Fascell Visitors Center, 9700 SW 328th St. in Homestead.

Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhinoceros, died in Kenya on Monday, leaving his species one step closer to extinction, even as a group of scientists undertake an unprecedented effort to try to keep this animal from vanishing entirely.

Florida is increasing its solar power installations faster than almost any other state in the nation, according to a new report by the Solar Energy Industries Association.


No more computer models or projections. Finally – concrete data.

A scientific paper published in February may pave the way for a new conversation about rising sea levels using data instead of projections.

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