Education

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Gov. Rick Scott wants the State Board of Education to change its plan to set passing scores based on a student’s race. But he isn’t saying what the board should do to alter the plan.

Every child should be performing on grade level in subjects like math and reading, Scott says. “I mean, I learn differently than other people learn, but I do know that all children can learn,” Scott says, “and we should expect we should have high standards for everybody.”

FLGOVSCOTT/Flickr

Gov. Rick Scott is trying to appease educators.

They didn’t like it when he chopped $1.3 billion in education funding from the state budget.

They liked it even less when he called for an expansion of charter schools and other alternatives to traditional public schools.

So, while most people are focused on the November ballot, USF Political Scientist Seth McKee says Scott appears to be ramping up his 2014 reelection campaign by extending an olive branch to teachers.

How WLRN Talked Education With 17 Million People

Oct 16, 2012
Tell Me More

Last week’s Twit­ter Edu­ca­tion Forum, hosted last week in col­lab­o­ra­tion with Tell Me More was a huge success. Not only did it pro­vide a plat­form for a dynamic and diverse con­ver­sa­tion about edu­ca­tion reform in the US (and one that we plan to con­tinue), but it also reached a whop­ping 17 mil­lion peo­ple–and count­ing. (That’s right. They’re stilll Tweet­ing. They just can’t stop!)

Over the past decade, hundreds of men have come forward to tell gruesome stories of abuse and terrible beatings they suffered at Florida's Dozier School for Boys, a notorious, state-run institution that closed last year after more than a century.

Known as the "White House Boys," these 300-some men were sent as boys to the reform school in the small panhandle town of Mariana in the 1950s and 1960s. They have joined together over the years to tell their stories of the violence administered in a small building on the school's grounds they knew as the White House.

WATCH: Youth Caregivers Fight To Finish School

Oct 12, 2012
YouTube Screenshot

Seventeen-year-old Jimmy Braat has three passions in life: playing music, photography, and being a caregiver to his grandma.

"It's all I'm good at!" he laughs. He started taking care of his great grandmother at age 9.

"My mom was always at work so it was kind of my role I guess," Jimmy says," She passed away at 92 when I was 13. So now, I take care of my grandmother."

Jimmy is three years behind in school and now participates in an online school program called hospital homebound.

How Education Figures Into The Presidential Race

Oct 12, 2012
cdsessums

On this week's show: we focus on education and compare the policies of the presidential candidates.  

President Obama and Mitt Romney agree on issues such as paying teachers based on student performance.  The main difference between the two is on the question of vouchers.  

Dogs Against Romney

Mitt Romney is getting his nose rubbed today in one of the most durable memes of the 2012 campaign, his hapless dog Seamus strapped to the roof of the family van during a long vacation road trip.

Only it’s not the dog this time. It’s Big Bird. Memes aren't memes, you know, unless they adapt.

This week, NPR's Tell Me More and StateImpact Florida hosted an international Twitter conversation about education reform at the WLRN studios. South Florida social media maven Alex de Carvalho (@alexdc) was one of the thousands of people to participate to join that conversation. He organizes regular local web and technology gatherings and is a founding member of RefreshMiami.

Tell Me More / NPR

This week, Tell Me More and StateImpact Florida hosted an international Twitter conversation about education reform at the WLRN studios. One of the thousands of people who participated in that conversation was Cindi Rigsbee. She's a teacher and author who blogs at cindirigsbee.com. She wrote this guest post after participating in the conversation on Wednesday.

 

Missed the Tell Me More radio special yesterday? No worries: the education reform debate continues online.  

NPR's news-talk program Tell Me More was in the WLRN studios with StateImpact Florida all day for an extensive discussion on education in America. 

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we will speak with a former education official who has had a change of heart about some of the school reforms she once championed. Diane Ravitch will be with us in just a few minutes.

Miami-Dade School System Inducts 14 Into Hall Of Fame

Oct 10, 2012

Fourteen of Miami-Dade Public School System's better-known and accomplished graduates were inducted into the first official Hall of Fame, Monday night at the New World Center in Miami Beach.

TELL US MORE: What Do You Think About Education Reform?

Oct 10, 2012
John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Missed the Tell Me More radio special this morning? No worries: the education reform debate continues online.  

NPR's news-talk program Tell Me More is in the WLRN studios with StateImpact Florida all day for an extensive discussion on education in America. 

Tell Me More and StateImpact Florida are asking:

The U.S. Supreme Court returns on Wednesday to the emotional issue of affirmative action in higher education. The court will once again hear oral arguments on the issue, this time in a case from the University of Texas.

Over the past 35 years, the court has twice ruled that race may be one of many factors in determining college admissions, as long as there are no racial quotas. Now, just nine years after its last decision, the justices seem poised to outright reverse or cut back on the previous rulings.

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