Education

Jessica Lucia / flickr Creative Commons

You might see some new and young faces in the office today.

That's  because Miami-Dade and Broward schools are allowing kids to miss a day of school to take part in “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.”

The day is designed to expose young people to different workplaces and inspire them to consider various career choices.

Kids who don't go to school today are excused, but they will have make up any school work they might miss.

The national “Take Our Daughters and Sons To Work Day” is actually April 23rd, but that is a testing day in Florida. 

Cornell University

Three months ago, W. Kent Fuchs became president of the University of Florida, leaving New York’s Cornell University.

Fuchs says Florida universities are adding new faculty, but opposition to higher tuition means more pressure to find private donations.

The University of Florida is also expanding a new online program with a goal of eventually enrolling 24,000 students.

Fuchs sat down with WLRN’s StateImpact Florida reporter John O’Connor to talk about the issues in higher education.

xinntii / Flickr

The federal government should ban overdraft fees for financial accounts established through a partnership between banks and colleges and universities, according to a new report from the Center for Responsible Lending.

Those overdraft fees can cost students hundreds of dollars a year -- more than books -- on accounts often set up to handle financial aid payments.

wcsryanhartley / Flickr

Testing experts say so far Florida's problems with its new statewide exam, the Florida Standards Assessments, are likely not serious enough for the state to consider throwing out this year’s test scores.

departmentofed / Flickr

Nearly one in five Florida third graders were at risk of being held back because of low scores on the state reading test last year.

But this year the state might not hold back any third graders. That’s because a Senate committee voted to suspend those penalties this year.

The bill requires an outside group to make sure the state test results are statistically valid.

Sen. David Simmons says he wants to make sure schools and the state can depend on Florida Standards Assessments results before making big decisions using those results.

Charles Trainor Jr / Miami Herald

Youssef Wardani never considered himself an activist.

He’s a fairly soft-spoken software engineer. He’s very organized and believes everything should have a plan from start to finish.

Activism for him was a sudden evolution  sparked by a Broward teacher who called his 14-year-old son a "raghead Taliban” and the bureaucracy of a school system he felt ignored him when he demanded accountability.

His son, Deyab-Houssein Wardani, 14, is a ninth grader at Cypress Bay High School in Weston. Everyone calls him D.H.

M.S. Butler / StateImpact Florida

A college education is generally considered a student's best shot at getting a good job these days, and it's often assumed most high schoolers are prepared to attend college.

But there's one group that has been quietly excluded from that process -- students with intellectual disabilities.

A program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg  is giving these students college experience that, while it's not a traditional degree, is giving them a head start on their career goals.

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