Education

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Teaching
11:32 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Despite Union Lawsuit, Governor Signs 'Partial Fix' For Teacher Evaluations

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 12:57 pm

Florida teachers will no longer be evaluated – and have their pay based on – the performance of students they don’t teach.

Gov. Rick Scott has signed a bill passed by the Florida Legislature that should allay some of their concerns.

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Technology
11:25 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Visit Sarasota County's Classrooms Of Tomorrow

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 2:04 pm

We recently told you about the high-tech math and science classrooms in Sarasota County.

That story was this week’s StateImpact Florida feature on state public radio stations.

Listen to the story and check out some of the photos of actress Mayim Bialik working on algebra problems and science experiments with students.

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Journalism
7:00 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Why This $350 Million Online Language School Moved To Miami

Open English is an online language school that has taught English to 100,000 students in more than 40 countries since 2006.

When Andrés Moreno, the chief executive officer of Open English gets off the plane in Bogotá, São Paolo, Caracas or pretty much any other major Latin American city, people who recognize him from the company’s TV ads stop to ask for photos and autographs.

So why, with all this notoriety, did the CEO of a $350 million dollar company that specializes in teaching English online to Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking students move the company’s main office from Latin America to Miami three years ago?

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Digital Classrooms
7:00 am
Mon June 17, 2013

What We Mean When We Talk About The Digital Divide In Florida

Students at Park Vista Community High School refurbish computers for donation.
Credit Sammy Mack / StateImpact Florida

It’s finals week at Park Vista Community High School and a small group of students buzzes over an assembly line of used Dell computers that lie cracked open with all their electronic guts exposed.

Many of the donated computers that Stabio refurbishes in class will be given to families who don’t have computers at home. It’s part of a Palm Beach County program aimed at closing the digital divide.

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Analysis
11:58 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Florida Test Gains Among Nation's Best Since 2003

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 12:27 pm

Florida students had some of the nation’s largest gains between 2003 and 2011 on a key national standardized test, according to a new analysis by Education Sector, a nonpartisan policy research group.

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Education
6:37 am
Mon June 10, 2013

WLRN Teams Up With FIU To Tell Radio Stories In A Digital Age

FIU students work with WLRN staff to produce their own radio reports.
Credit Photo by Doug Garland

The class is gathered around a conference table in the newsroom shared by the Miami Herald and WLRN public radio. On the screen in front of them is a reporter, John O’Connor, connected via Skype. This class often covers how multimedia platforms are taking over newsrooms, so it makes sense that today’s speaker is streaming live from the Internet.

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Diversity
6:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Se Habla Espanol? Pioneering Bilingual Ed At Miami's Coral Way Elementary

A first-grade, Spanish-language reading class at Coral Way Elementary in 1964. A thermometer on the wall shows that it was cold on that winter day.
Credit University of Arizona's Coral Way Bilingual Elementary Program Oral History Project

The first English/Spanish bilingual education program in the country started at Miami's Coral Way Elementary in 1963. It was supposed to be a temporary curriculum to help Cuban students retain their language and culture, while people waited for the Castro regime to fall. 

Today the school, which has since expanded to the eighth grade, continues to thrive. Coral Way's elementary students spend about 60% of the day learning in English and 40% learning in Spanish.

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Jobs
7:14 am
Mon June 3, 2013

If Employment Game Has Changed, Who's Teaching The Rules?

Students aren't getting the advice they need to be successful, according to Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:31 pm

It still pays to earn a college degree. That is, if you get the right one. Georgetown University published a report Wednesday that looked into this dilemma.

"The labor market demands more specialization. So, the game has changed," says Anthony Carnevale, the report's co-author and director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.

Carnevale says students probably aren't choosing the right degrees because they haven't been given the right guidance.

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The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

This Week's Florida Roundup: Hurricanes, Texting And Driving, And Education Policy

Texting while driving is soon to be illegal in Florida. But does the new law actually have enough teeth to make a difference? What about those red light cameras? An update on the way we drive.

Key decisions are made in next month’s trial of George Zimmerman, who stands accused of murdering Trayvon Martin. What will jurors know about the Miami Gardens teenager’s background? What won’t they hear in the trial everyone will be watching in Sanford starting next month.

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Community Contributor
6:30 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Teachers May Sometimes Feel Like Sisyphus, But Pushing That Boulder Has Its Benefits

Neyda Borges was selected the Region I Teacher of the Year in 2011.

What have I learned this school year?

I've learned that teaching is hard. Not only because of the curriculum, not only because of the new tests, new rules, new measures. Not only because there are tests, tests, and more tests. But because it so often feels like an insurmountable, thankless, stressful endeavor.

The rules are always changing. The tests are always changing. And the blame for anything and everything that goes wrong usually falls squarely on our shoulders.

But teaching is also so rewarding.

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Digital Classrooms
8:49 am
Mon May 27, 2013

What Florida Schools Can Learn From One Laptop Per Child

First grader Adam Redding and his mother Lyndra Forbes research the parts of a plant on a classroom computer.
Credit Sammy Mack / StateImpact Florida

It’s family literacy night at Holmes Elementary School in Liberty City, and first grader Adam Redding is reading a poem about plants while he absentmindedly tips dirt out of a plastic cup and onto a laptop.

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