Education

Florida New Majority

As Miami-Dade County prepares for public input on its budget, a local non-profit is teaching residents how to advocate for the causes they care about.

Going through Miami-Dade’s $7 billion budget can be a daunting task for the average citizen. 

That is why Florida New Majority says it created a series of workshops to teach the public how to find information in the voluminous budget document.

United States Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited Leon County Tuesday, making stops at Holy Comforter Episcopal School and the Florida State University Research School. DeVos used the trip to champion school choice and individual liberties.

University of Tampa Professor Fired Over Hurricane Tweet

Aug 30, 2017

The University of Tampa on Tuesday fired a visiting professor who tweeted that Texas was experiencing “instant karma” from the destruction of Hurricane Harvey because the state voted for Republicans.

Brandon McElveen's Ford F150 pickup is lifted up about six inches. He says that's just the style in the South, but this week, "it's come in handy" for driving through up to four feet of water.

McElveen's a counselor at the KIPP Explore Academy elementary school in Houston. Within hours of the flooding this week, he began getting calls and messages asking for help. One was from a family with two girls on the middle school softball team he also coaches.

With his truck and a borrowed kayak, he estimates he's helped more than 20 people to safety.

The start of the school year can be rough on some kids. It's a big shift from summer's freedom and lack of structure to the measured routines of school. And sometimes that can build up into tears, losing sleep, outbursts and other classic signs of anxiety.

"Going back to school is a transition for everyone," says Lynn Bufka, a practicing psychologist who also works at the American Psychological Association. "No matter the age of the child, or if they've been to school before."

On Friday night, Fabrice Charles is planning to go to bed early so he can get a good night's sleep. He's got a big day on Saturday, when he'll join hundreds of thousands of other students taking the new summer SAT.

"I get stressed really easily," he says, "so I've just got to relax and think back to my exercises."

For the first time since the 1970s, the College Board is offering an August SAT testing date and the rising high school senior in Boston says he's ready.

Joel Ryan / AP

The first day of school can be traumatic. Reluctant high schoolers schlep unopened summer reading books aboard early morning buses. Kindergartners sob at being separated from their parents -- and vice-versa.

It was the year 2000 and Maine's governor at the time, Angus King, was excited about the Internet. The World Wide Web was still relatively young but King wanted every student in the state to have access to it.

"Go into history class and the teacher says, 'Open your computer. We're going to go to rome.com and we're going to watch an archaeologist explore the Catacombs this morning in real time.' What a learning tool that is!"

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Tamia Roberts, 17, dreams of becoming a cinematographer. She’s now a senior in high school and spends her free time writing scripts and building her YouTube channel to showcase her films.

Roberts is one of 1,709 students this summer who applied and were chosen for the Summer Youth Internship Program funded by The Children’s Trust in Miami.

“I learned to make connections and always take people’s business cards because you never know when you will need them again,” said Roberts.

Malala Yousafzai was only 15 when she was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan for campaigning for the education of girls. Now, she has been accepted to Oxford, one of the world's elite universities.

Malala tweeted, "So excited to go to Oxford!!!" She also congratulated other students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland who received news Thursday about their university futures.

At Oxford Malala will study philosophy, politics and economics.

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

The after-school hours present each student with the possibility to socialize and learn new skills through extracurricular activities. Experts indicate that these can be valuable learning opportunities, but what happens if the students can’t afford after-school involvement?

Focusing on expanding access to after-school programs, The Children’s Trust in Miami is leading a collaboration with the U.S. Soccer Foundation to bring the program Soccer for Success to Miami-Dade. The program focuses on providing organized soccer and nutritional education to low-income families.

Allison Light / WLRN

Some school districts are chafing under a provision meant to adjust funding based on cost of living.  They’re applauding an effort to study the system, but from different perspectives.

It's a fall tradition: Students don college sweatshirts and their parents, meanwhile, sweat the tuition bills.

One flash-in-the-pan movie this summer even featured a couple, played by Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler, who start a casino to cope with their kids' college costs.

Annual tuition hikes have been pretty much a given in higher ed, but recently, there are signs that the decades-long rise in college costs is nearing a peak.

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