Education

The day before school let out in May, 9-year old Hailey Everett brought home a certificate for making the honor roll at Chocachatti Elementary School in Hernando County.  The next day, her grandmother and guardian Pam Everett got a call from the school's principal telling her Hailey would not be promoted to fourth grade.

Decision Florida: Is Your Vote Safe?

Oct 21, 2016
Associated Press

This week in Decision Florida, hosts Melissa Ross from WJCT and Tom Hudson from WLRN talk about voter access in light of the Donald Trump campaign's claims of a rigged election, how the November results will impact education in our state and the controversy around solar amendment 1.

With early voting starting on Monday October 24th, Susan Bucher, Supervisor of Elections in Palm Beach County, discuss the effects of extending the registration deadline one more week and how the County has been preparing for elections. 

It’s lunchtime at Jacksonville’s Lee High School, and Principal Scott Schneider walks down the school’s math hall. He says Lee has had its share of teacher vacancies.


The high school graduation rate in the U.S. reached an all-time high of 83 percent in the 2014-2015 school year, President Obama announced today, marking the fifth straight record-setting year.

Achievement gaps have narrowed even as all boats have risen. Graduation rates range from 90 percent for students who identify as Asian/Pacific Islanders to 64 percent for students with disabilities.

Parents and teachers are worried.

They believe that today's kids are growing up in an unkind world and that learning to be kind is even more important than getting good grades. But, when it comes to defining "kind," parents and teachers don't always agree.

That's according to a new survey of some 2,000 parents and 500 teachers from the educational nonprofit behind Sesame Street, Sesame Workshop.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

A year ago, Miami-Dade County Public Schools made a splash by eliminating out-of-school suspensions. At the time, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho cited research saying sending kids home made them fall behind in school and made them more likely to get into trouble again.

The major for-profit university chain DeVry has agreed to stop making its often-repeated claim: that since 1975, 90 percent of its graduates seeking employment found jobs in their field within six months of graduation.

Latinos are by far the fastest growing chunk ofthe U.S. school population. A new report by the National Council of La Raza gives a fascinating snapshot of this fast-growing population.

Here are some highlights:

Demographics

  • Over the last 15 years, Latino enrollment has significantly outpaced that of whites and African-Americans.
  • Latinos under the age of 18 now total 18.2 million, a 47 percent jump since 2000.
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options.

At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as students input information on laptops. 

Regency Beauty Institute has joined the list of for-profit school closures.

The national cosmetology school closed all 79 of its locations, including one in Tampa.

On its website, Regency cited several reasons for closing.

Three Florida high school students are facing suspension for wearing Ku Klux Klan costumes to school.


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