Education

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The Keys already had an affordable housing problem, before Hurricane Irma. Then that storm destroyed thousands of homes and is already driving up rents. So some government agencies in the Keys are looking at going into the landlord business.

FIU Students March for 'Clean' Dream Act

Nov 9, 2017
Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Several dozen Florida International University students walked out of classes and marched around campus Thursday calling for federal immigration reform.

Students called on Congress to pass a “clean” Dream Act, without attaching it to anti-immigration policies like a border wall. They also protested the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  That’s President Obama’s policy to suspend deportation for young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children.

surveillance camera
John Seung-Hwan Shin, Wikipedia Creative Commons / WLRN

Pembroke Pines has final approval from city commissioners to overhaul and upgrade security cameras at its charter schools.

The two K-8 schools, two K-5 schools and the middle school Academic Village will have more than 100 analog surveillance cameras replaced by digital cameras and more than 180 new digital cameras added. 

That means 40 percent more of the school grounds will be under surveillance.

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission will consider a proposal that would make it easier for schools to comply with class-size limits, with any financial savings required to go toward higher teacher pay.

The chair of Miami-Dade County’s school board wants to set a deadline for the district to decide whether to join a  legal challenge against a controversial new charter school law.

Dropping The F-Bomb In Class? Teachers Weigh In

Nov 3, 2017

Warning: This post contains language that some may find offensive.

So we asked, and you answered: Is it ever OK for students to curse in the classroom?

The question comes out of our "Raising Kings" series, where a radical new approach in a Washington, D.C., high school has led educators to move beyond suspending students for disruptive behavior, to talking with those kids to learn where the behavior comes from.

FAU Study Finds 6% Of Adolescents Bully Themselves Online

Oct 31, 2017
Flickr/Eddie~S

Parents: Have your kids been cyberbullied? If so, have you considered they might be the ones posting mean comments about themselves?

A new Florida Atlantic University study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health found about about 6 percent of adolescents have engaged in “digital self-harm.”

Boys were more likely than girls to post or share mean things about themselves on social media. And LGBT kids were three times as likely than their peers to “self-troll.”

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

After Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, 18-year-old Ledishla Acevedo booked a flight to Miami in hopes of continuing her college education in Florida.

When she arrived at her cousin’s house here, she turned on the lights and started to cry.

Then she took a hot shower and cried some more.

This past spring, a history teacher in North Carolina was giving a lesson about Christopher Columbus. He covered how Columbus and his men enslaved and otherwise mistreated the native people of the island of Hispaniola.

One white student piped up: "Well, that's what needed to happen. They were just dumb people anyways like they are today. That was the purpose, that's why we need a wall."

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Howard Webster’s third graders had “first-day jitters” on Sept. 18. But the first day of school had been nearly a month earlier.

Gateway Environmental K-8 Learning Center in Homestead was closed for seven school days because of Hurricane Irma, as were most other schools in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

“With the kids being out so long, it's like starting school all over again,” Webster said during an after-school event shortly after the storm.

One month since Maria hit Puerto Rico, the wait for Irma's food benefits in South Florida and Florida public schools vs. the state over charter schools all on this week's 'special pledge edition' of The Florida Roundup with host Tom Hudson. 

Guests: 

When the drinking water in Flint, Mich., became contaminated with lead, causing a major public health crisis, 11-year-old Gitanjali Rao took notice.

"I'll be famous one day, but for now I'm stuck in middle school with a bunch of morons." That's harsh language from the downtrodden sixth-grade narrator of Diary of A Wimpy Kid, a blockbuster series of graphic novels.

But it speaks to a broader truth.

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