Arts & Culture

Taking The Plunge

May 9, 2012
Alicia Zuckerman

UPDATE  June 6, 2013 14:43 p.m.: (AP) Esther Williams, the swimming champion turned actress who starred in glittering and aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 91.

Williams died early Thursday in her sleep, according to her longtime publicist Harlan Boll.

Following in the footsteps of Sonja Henie, who went from skating champion to movie star, Williams became one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, appearing in spectacular swimsuit numbers that capitalized on her wholesome beauty and perfect figure.

 

After an incursion by the upstart Miami Cuban community, the people have spoken – Tampa is the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

More than 7,200 people voted at the NPR food blog, “The Salt,” and the results speak for themselves: 57 percent for Tampa, 43 percent for Miami as the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

On an icy night in late December, Miami native Robert Battle, the new artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, saw his past and future come together in the heart of New York City.

After a year and a half of public grooming, of working alongside his towering predecessor, Judith Jamison, Battle was finally at the head of modern dance's most famous company, and in programming the troupe's annual five-week season at City Center Theatre, a major event in the New York dance world, he had made his real debut as director.

Yucel Tellici/stock.xchang

Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay for Under the Sun about her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.  Here are a few recipes you might want to add to your holiday table.  One is more elaborate–perhaps for a host to serve.  The other is super simple–perhaps something a guest can contribute to a party.  These recipes are from Abu-Jaber’s memoir, The Language of Baklava (Pantheon Books).

POETIC BAKLAVA

Diana Abu-Jaber On Sharing The Table During The Holidays

Dec 14, 2011
Diana Abu-Jaber

For many of us, cooking for a holiday feast or making preparations for a party are well worn and beloved holiday routines.  All of that hosting can also be exhausting!  Listen to author Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay on her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.

Muralist Makes His Mark In Little Haiti

Sep 14, 2011
Trina Sargalski

If you’ve ever visited Little Haiti, you’ve probably seen Miami muralist Serge Toussaint’s work, which is sprinkled throughout the city. How can you tell it’s his work? His signature is a dollar sign instead of an “S” in Serge. He spends most of his time in Little Haiti, but his work can be seen in Liberty City, Little River, Allapattah, the Miami River and all the way to Fort Lauderdale.

Alicia Zuckerman

When you stop and listen to your surroundings, what do you hear? We take sound for granted because it’s around us all the time. But when you are forced to listen in a different way, you hear a different story.

All In A Day’s Work: A Man And His Mangos

Jul 7, 2011
Trina Sargalski / WLRN

It’s mango season in South Florida. Thanks to our humid climate and poor soil, this region excels at mango growing – only rivaled by Hawaii. The man who knows most about mangoes in Miami is Dr. Richard Campbell, the senior curator of tropical fruit at the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables.

American Fare At “La Vaquita”

Jun 22, 2011
Julia Longoria

Farm Stores have been a staple of South Florida since the 1950s, when the chain opened its first drive-through store in South Beach. Generations have taken advantage of its convenience, picking up necessities such as milk and eggs and treats such as ice cream. Today, there are 100 stores across South Florida.
 

A Journalist Turns His Mic On Haiti's Grievances

Jan 13, 2011

One of the aftereffects of the earthquake in Haiti is that local journalists have found new freedom. Many are now airing the kinds of political commentary and criticism that used to invite violence and censure– even death.

The shift comes across loud and clear on Haiti’s airwaves, where most people get their news.

Jennifer Maloney brings us the story of Haitian radio host and reporter Makenson Remy, known to listeners as “Four-by-Four” because of his rugged brand of go-anywhere reporting.

Hear The Hymn: Mwen Pap Sa Bliye

Aug 9, 2010
WLRN

This hymn is the one you hear under our piece, “Faith in the Aftermath.” The original segment explores how parishioners at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church here in Miami leaned on their faith and on song after their country’s massive earthquake– to heal and to release their grief.

Episode 4: Chickens In South Florida

Feb 18, 2010
Michal Zacharzewski (stock.xchang)

There are some people who think that if a parrot is considered a pet, then a chicken should be as well.  They keep a small number of “domestic chickens” in their yards.

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