Arts & Culture

Arthur Rothstein / Arthur Rothstein Archive

Arthur Rothstein was a young man in the 1930s. He originally wanted to be a doctor. But it was the Depression and he went to work for the Farm Security Administration, documenting American workers and the conditions they faced.

In 1938, that assignment took him to Key West. The city suffered more than most in the Depression, declaring bankruptcy and essentially handing itself over to the state. The state, in turn, brought in a New Deal administrator who decided the island should remake itself as a tourist mecca.

Old-School Films Starring Women At The Wolfsonian This August

Jul 15, 2015
Screenshot from Netflix

The Wolfsonian-FIU Museum's newest exhibit chronicles an arts enterprise at Tulane University's former women's college. From 1895 to 1940, students sold pottery, embroidery and jewelry made in the program.

In the spirit of the Newcomb Pottery Enterprise, the Wolfsonian is launching a month-long women’s film series, titled “Leading Ladies.” Each Friday in August at 7 p.m., the museum will screen classic movies starring women.

Here’s the lineup:

Graphic by Kenny Malone

It may be the day the classical music died, but Classical South Florida listeners still have no official word that three local radio stations have been sold to a California-based religious broadcasting company.

Current, a public media trade publication, reports that the Minnesota-based American Public Media Group is selling Classical South Florida's stations to the Education Media Foundation for $21.7 million.

A French Musician Finds Niche With South Florida Audiences

Jul 8, 2015
Sonya Revell / FrenchHornCollective.com

Vincent Raffard says “the magic of life” brought him to Miami.

The longtime musician from Paris, France, says he never expected to leave the ironclad boulevards for palm trees and sandy beaches.

“I didn’t have any desire to come to South Florida,” he says. 

After coming to the Sunshine State on tour, he decided to stay and continue his career as a musician in Miami. Eight years later, the 35-year-old has produced a solo album and formed a band called the French Horn Collective.

When Amy Winehouse, the British musician who sang memorably about her refusal to go to rehab, died due to problems related to drugs, alcohol and bulimia in July 2011, she was nearly as famous for her personal struggles as she was for her music. Just 27, Winehouse had been tabloid fodder for years.

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