youth gun violence

Two Miami artists are creating a visual archive of the toll gun violence takes by drawing portraits of people whose lives ended abruptly by bullets.

Chire Regans and Markeven Williams embarked on their individual projects around the same time, but they didn't know each other. Regan, a teaching artist at the Perez Art Museum, and Williams, a corrections officer, both say they were moved by the killing of six-year old King Carter in 2016. King was going to buy candy outside of his North Miami-Dade home when he was shot. 

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The faces of 90 victims of gun violence in South Florida, done in black-and-white sketches by PAMM Teaching Artist Chire Regans, presided on Thursday night over a parent forum and resource fair to address youth violence and prevention. They were a stark reminder of the lives at stake if violence and youth outreach isn’t addressed more around Miami-Dade  County. 


Ryan McBride / Courtesy of the Boston Herald

Every high school graduation is a triumph in its own way — a mix of beginnings and endings.

And there’s another story that now belongs to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School class of 2018: the journey that comes after tragedy.

As students count down the days until summer vacation, concerned parents are scrambling to keep survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre occupied so they don't have extra time to relive the nightmare.

Miami-Dade Bar Association

The Dade County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section held an essay contest for students to discuss their experiences with gun violence and to offer up possible solutions.

Students from across Miami-Dade wrote about hearing gun shots outside of their homes, the lack of resources for neighborhoods plagued by gun violence and the need for more counselors to address youth trauma.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Survivors of gun violence from across Miami-Dade gathered at the Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park  Saturday to share their experiences.

Miami Herald

Hundreds of Miami Northwestern students walked out of class on Tuesday — a day after an on-campus tribute was held in memory of 17-year-old Kimson Green, who was shot and killed at a Liberty Square Housing Project on Sunday.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The students at Miami Northwestern High School  left their morning classes for an outdoor tribute in memory of Kimson Green, a sophomore at the school who was killed in the Liberty Square Housing project Sunday.

Danny Hwang / WLRN News

Among the many voices in the dialogue surrounding Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of his assassination, Miami's youth honored his memory by joining in on a march against gun violence.

The Unity March Against Gun Violence was part of the 15th annual "Reclaim The Dream Candlelight Memorial Service" held Wednesday night at Athalie Range Park in Liberty City. 

Sunset Petit-Frere, a ninth grader at Miami Central High School, attended the march and service because she saw a connection between gun violence and Dr. King’s legacy.

Patrick Farrell / WLRN

Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church is sandwiched between a police station and a housing project in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. Dozens of families over the years have filed into the church’s sanctuary to say tear-filled goodbyes to children and teens killed by gun violence.

Camila Kerwin / WLRN

In the wake of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, politicians and activists have discussed funding more gun injury research.

Stoneman Shooting Survivors
Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

 

Students who survived the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School vowed to make sure that their 17 classmates and teachers did not die in vain. 

 

Nadege Green and Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

In South Florida, it's happened before -- young people rallying and raising their voices against gun violence.

About a dozen elementary school kids took to the streets inside the Liberty Square housing projects in April 2016 chanting, " We don't want to die; stop shooting. We don't want to die; stop shooting."

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