youth

Miami Herald

Emory Jones just needs to look at his left arm for a reminder of what happened at Avon Park Youth Academy. There is a faint scar in the shape of a snake above his elbow from when an officer beat him.

Graphic: WLRN


Eighteen-year-old Summer Elnowno has been waiting to vote for a long time. When her birthday arrived in May, she recalled,  “Finally, I had the chance to voice my opinion somewhere. But the 2016 presidential race has been a dispiriting coming of age.

When Lanarion Norwood Jr. was 9 years old, he opened his family's refrigerator to find it almost empty. His grandmother, unemployed because of disability, had run out of food for the month. So Norwood did what many young children adamantly resist: He went to bed early. Sleeping, he reasoned, would help him suppress hunger, and he knew the next day he could eat at his Atlanta school.

Miami Dade College (Live stream)

Miami has experienced a spike in shootings of and by young people in the opening months of 2016. But the organizers of Wednesday’s “Goals NOT Guns” summit, planned for weeks and held in Little Havana,  could not have known just how timely it would be.

Richard Graulich / Palm Beach Post

The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice is ending its relationship with one of the state’s largest operators of juvenile detention facilities. Youth Services International Inc. currently operates seven juvenile detention centers in contracts with the state, but its work has been marked by  a long history of legal battles and allegations of child abuse.

Community Groups Demand Action On School Discipline Reform

Mar 18, 2016
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Churches and community groups from around the city gathered in North Miami Monday night to demand public officials do more to reform discipline practices in local schools.

 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

There’s a lot that goes on outside the debates that were held in South Florida this week.

In a building, steps away from where the Democratic candidates stood on stage in front of the microphones and cameras at Miami Dade College’s Kendall Campus Wednesday night, is the campus cafeteria. Inside, skinny tables with blue tablecloths are set up in rows.

This is where the people behind those microphones and cameras write and report their stories. Benjamin Burstein got there around 7 in the morning, long before most reporters who didn’t show up until 5 p.m.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Religiously, there’s nothing more Mexican than la posada, the December street procession that re-enacts the Virgin Mary’s search for a place to give birth to Jesus. Musically, there’s nothing more Mexican than mariachi — that roaring mix of trumpets, violins, guitars and flamboyant sombreros.

Put them together, as Homestead's burgeoning Mexican-American community did this month, and you've got the perfect Mexican Christmas.

But the mariachi part was an exuberant debut: It was the first public performance by the city's new mariachi academy.

Judi Durand / National Urban League

Besides bringing presidential candidates to South Florida, this week’s National Urban League Conference in Fort Lauderdale is also bringing a variety of programs that could benefit South Florida’s residents.

One of these initiatives is the National Urban League’s Youth Leadership Summit. 

This annual summit will bring together nearly 600 youth leaders from around the country at Nova Southeastern University. 

How This Miami Food Truck Is Run By At-Risk Youths

Aug 28, 2014
Carla Javier / WLRN

The Vibe 305 food truck serves up sandwiches with unconventional names: gratitude, hope, and opportunity, for example.

It's staffed by young men, 12 to 19 years old. They are part of the Empowered Youth USA program in Miami.

Marva Hinton

This summer Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale expanded a volunteer program that brings teenagers and older patients together.

It’s designed to help the patients avoid delirium,  a common condition that can make hospital stays unpleasant and even frightening.

During a typical day for  volunteers in the Tender Loving Care-Advanced program, they fan out into patient rooms bringing cards, magazines, dice, books and newspapers.