weather

Ready or not, South Florida, rain is coming.

Regardless of whether a tropical wave lurking offshore actually musters the strength to become a more fierce storm, forecasters say the region is in for a soggy, wet weekend, with possible flooding. Early Friday morning, the system continued to weaken as it encountered crippling wind shear. But forecasters say there’s still a chance it could find footing in warm waters over the Bahamas and make a powerful landfall in South Florida and the Keys.

 

In the small flood-ravaged town of Springfield, La., Rachel Moriarity waited more than a week for a center where she could apply for emergency food stamps to finally open in the Am-Vets hall — but she's been turned away at the door.

This week they are processing only those with last names beginning with A through D.

"I don't have a vehicle to get here," she tells a staffer from the state, who replies that due to the volume of applicants in need, there isn't anything they can do.

Tropics Heating Up With Fiona, Gaston And “Something”

Aug 23, 2016

The heart of hurricane season is here, and the tropics are certainly alive. Three systems of interest are moving across the open waters of the Atlantic. Fizzling Tropical Depression Fiona and budding Tropical Storm Gaston are of little concern, but a much weaker undeveloped tropical "something" -- presently referred as Invest 99 by the meteorological community -- is creating quite a stir on social media.

If you think it's been hot this year, you're right. The latest temperature numbers from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say the first six months of 2016 were the hottest on record around the planet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=bBa9bVYKLP0

It’s not enough to just say you’ll be ready. National Hurricane Center Director Dr. Rick Knabb says you need a plan. And it’s easy.

When Will It Feel Like Fall In South Florida?

Sep 23, 2015
Graphic by Kenny Malone. Beach and pumpkin images from Flickr users Jorge Brazil and Kam Abbot (respectively) per CC license.

Wednesday may technically be the first day of fall, but it certainly doesn't feel any different.

In South Florida, according to the National Weather Service, "fall-like weather is usually delayed by about 4-6 weeks from the start of fall."

A new but controversial study asks if an end is coming to the busy Atlantic hurricane seasons of recent decades.

The Atlantic looks like it is entering in to a new quieter cycle of storm activity, like in the 1970s and 1980s, two prominent hurricane researchers wrote Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Weather Underground

Around South Florida,  some residents are cautiously preparing for Erika.

It’s not yet clear if Erika will be a full blown hurricane or a lesser storm  that will impact South Florida.

Michael Amend of Miami Beach was stocking up on water at Home Depot in North  Miami -- just in case.

"I think you have to take it seriously and wait and see how it develops," he said. 

Angie Bryan who lives in Miami Shores, said she was making sure she had extra cannisters of propane. In case of a power outage, she plans to fire up her grill to cook.

Here's A Reminder Of What You Need In Case Of Hurricane

Aug 27, 2015
FPREN / Courtesy

With Tropical Storm Erika, the second major storm to threaten Florida this hurricane season, making its way across the Atlantic, all South Florida residents should take steps to be prepared in case of tropical weather.

It's been 10 years since the last major hurricane hit South Florida, so we'd like to help you find and dust off your hurricane supplies.

U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Admit it, some of you were watching every single update on Hurricane Danny. Your heart perhaps skipped a beat or two every time the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration kept boosting Danny all the way up to a category three.

As of this post, Monday afternoon, Danny had winds up to 30 mph and was expected to bring a few inches of rain to Puerto Rico and Haiti this week.

Hurricane Danny Becomes Major Storm At Cat 3

Aug 21, 2015
National Hurricane Center

Hours after it strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane, Danny, this season's first storm grew to a Category 3.

Below is an excerpt from the National Hurricane Center's statement:

Reports from a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that Danny is now a Category 3 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The maximum winds are estimated to be 115 mph (185 km/h) with higher gusts.

It wasn't all in your head — last month was hotter than ever before.

Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration report that July had the highest average temperatures in records since 1880.

And it's not just in the U.S. Average July temperatures around the world set heat records too, NPR's Kat Chow reports.

She tells our Newscast unit that:

"This confirms what NASA and a Japanese agency found using separate data.

A tropical depression in the Atlantic Ocean has become a tropical storm named Danny, according to the National Hurricane Center.

This year's El Niño is shaping up to be a whopper — potentially surpassing the one in 1997, which was the strongest on record, the National Weather Service says.

That could be good news for drought-stricken California, but not-so-good for places such as the Philippines and Indonesia, which typically experience below-normal rainfall or drought conditions during El Niños.

Three Things To Know This Hurricane Season

Jun 19, 2015
NASA/Rob Gutro / Flickr

For five months each year, the warm climate that makes Florida famous creates the ideal conditions for storms to brew. Florida hasn’t been directly hit by a hurricane in 10 years, and roughly two weeks into hurricane season the tropics seem quiet. So far.

Still, residents and emergency responders alike must be prepared for any extreme weather. Representatives from Florida Power and Light, the National Hurricane Center and the Department of Public Safety recently met in West Palm Beach to discuss what’s expected this hurricane season and what residents need to know to stay safe.

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