weather

Three Things To Know This Hurricane Season

Jun 19, 2015
NASA/Rob Gutro / Flickr

For five months each year, the warm climate that makes Florida famous creates the ideal conditions for storms to brew. Florida hasn’t been directly hit by a hurricane in 10 years, and roughly two weeks into hurricane season the tropics seem quiet. So far.

Still, residents and emergency responders alike must be prepared for any extreme weather. Representatives from Florida Power and Light, the National Hurricane Center and the Department of Public Safety recently met in West Palm Beach to discuss what’s expected this hurricane season and what residents need to know to stay safe.

National Weather Service

“Why is the sky turning pink?”

That’s what my 6-year-old asked me as we watched one of the TV weather forecasts this week. We were on the couch in shorts and T-shirts, just back from the zoo with Grandma who was visiting.

South Florida Hits The 40s -- And We Can't Handle It

Feb 20, 2015
freedigitalphotos.net

This morning, Miami hit the low 40s -- an unusually low forecast for the so-called Sunshine State.

Thin-skinned South Floridians have flocked to the Twittersphere to complain. Here are a few of your frigid grievances--and a few responses from even colder out-of-towners.    

Winter has arrived in the United States: Over the next day or so, the jet stream will dip and bring some bone-chilling temperatures to a huge swath of the country.

Meteorologists at the Weather Channel say the winter storm will "bring a swath of snow more than 2,000 miles long from the Cascades and Northern Rockies across the Midwest and into the Northeast through Tuesday."

A big winter storm spinning its way across the East Coast of the United States is expected to wreak havoc on Thanksgiving Day travel plans.

The National Weather Service says that travelers from the Carolinas all the way up to New England could see significant snow, and the entire East Coast will see some kind of precipitation.

Weather.com reports:

As Hurricane Gonzalo bears down on Bermuda, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hurricane scientists are analyzing data from a recent experiment involving drones to improve hurricane forecast models in the future. 

Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald

As residents of the Sunshine State, our beach days don’t end when students go back to school, nor do the challenges that beachgoers can face.

A cooling breeze and gentle waves greet visitors on a rare green-flag day in St. Lucie County. But it’s not always that way. St. Lucie County lifeguard Grayson Money says just a week before, rip currents posed quite a danger.

"You get strong winds, especially out of the Southeast," he says. "That’s really good for producing rip currents and that’s also our No. 1 rescue, really, is the rip current rescue.”

freedigitalphotos.net

Yesterday, the Miami-Dade Sea Level Rise Task Force released a report detailing six recommendations to the county. 

The main recommendation calls on county officials to consult experts to create an infrastructure that can adapt to rising sea levels. 

Jim Murley is the executive director of the South Florida Regional Planning Council, and was the vice-chairperson of the task force.

Palm Beach County Fights Hurricane Amnesia

Jun 8, 2014
Constanza Gallardo

Palm Beach County prepares to fight hurricane amnesia, a common ideology held by the county’s officials and emergency management.

The Emergency Operations Center in Palm Beach County held its annual hurricane briefing for legislative officials and media last week. Emergency management strongly advised officials to inform their communities to have a plan and kit for any situation.

Do Female-Named Hurricanes Need To Lean In?

Jun 3, 2014

We were alarmed to learn yesterday that hurricanes with female names are not being taken as seriously as their male counterparts. It seems people in the path of a hurricane are more likely to heed warnings to take shelter or evacuate if the storm is named Charley than if the storm is named Eloise. Which can be a deadly decision. [Because, seriously: Hurricanes are dangerous — even if they have "lady" names.

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