water quality

Getty images via Miami Herald

People drinking tap water across the Miami area this week may notice the smell and taste of chlorine as Miami-Dade launches the annual cleaning of its underground pipes.

The “cleansing” began Monday and runs through Nov. 19. The county issued an advisory about the likelihood of changes in odor and taste in Miami-Dade’s drinking water.

Three Reasons Why You Need To Boil Water After A Storm

Sep 24, 2017
Mathanki Kodavasal / flickr

Dozens of Florida communities were advised to boil their drinking water for a period of time in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, including in Hollywood, Pembroke Pines and West Palm Beach.

Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority

Twenty years ago, only a few areas in the Keys had central sewer systems.

The rest of the island chain was using a combination of shallow injection wells, septic tanks — and even some cesspits, basically holes in the ground that provided no treatment at all.

Since the Keys consists of fossilized coral, that meant polluted water could easily move to canals and shorelines.

Miami Waterkeeper

The environmental advocacy group Miami Waterkeeper is suing Miami-Dade County for allegedly violating the Clean Water Act after finding a sewage pipe that might have been leaking into the ocean for almost a year.

The Waterkeepers filed a notice of intent to sue in 60 days. The lawsuit will ask the county to fix this leak and inspect all outfall pipes, as well as suggest that the county contribute to the Biscayne Bay restoration trust fund, instead of paying civil penalties.

Activists are abandoning a federal challenge of Florida’s water quality standards after the Trump Administration refused to step in.

Monroe County

To improve water quality near shore, the Florida Keys has spent hundreds of millions over the last 20 years upgrading wastewater treatment systems and improving how stormwater is handled.

The lead contamination in Flint, Michigan and the sewage spills in St. Petersburg are only two of many examples of why more consumers are asking questions about the quality of their own drinking water.

That's one of the findings of a new survey being released this week by the Water Quality Association, a national trade organization representing the water treatment industry.

Negron’s Water Plan Filed In Florida House

Feb 13, 2017

Rep. Thad Altman, R-Rockledge, filed a House bill Friday to match a controversial $2.4 billion proposal — backed by Senate President Joe Negron — to buy farmland south of Lake Okeechobee.

A coalition calling itself Stand Up North Florida went public Monday. It says it wants more state water conservation money to go to North and Central Florida. Representing the group were local and state politicians and business leaders. Environmentalists were notably absent.

Septic Tank Inspections Sought As Part Of Home Sales

Jan 19, 2017

Pointing in part to water-quality problems in the Indian River Lagoon, a Brevard County House member Wednesday proposed requiring septic-tank inspections as part of the sales of homes and other types of real estate.

Everglades Water Quality Nearly At Acceptable Levels

Dec 19, 2016

After more than two decades of work to restore water quality in the Florida Everglades it’s now nearing federal and state standards.


Scientists Seek Re-Evaluation of Everglades Restoration

Dec 19, 2016

A committee of scientists is recommending a re-evaluation of a $16 billion restoration of the Florida Everglades, the largest in American history.


Water containing low-level radiation and other pollutants has poured into Florida's primary drinking water aquifer through a gaping sinkhole 45 feet wide.

It happened at a plant owned by fertilizer giant Mosaic in central Florida's rural Polk County, Robin Sussingham of member station WUSF reports.

An attorney representing three central Florida residents in a federal lawsuit against Mosaic says the legal action is about ensuring safe drinking water. The proposed class-action suit was filed after a sinkhole beneath a Mosaic plant near Lakeland sent 200 million gallons of waste water into the Floridan aquifer.

The lawsuit is the first against Mosaic since the phosphate and potash producer, the world’s largest, reported the sinkhole to government agencies in late August.

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