Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Workers at the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood and Miami international airports joined with others across the country to fight for better working conditions Thursday. Workers at JFK and LaGuardia airports in New York, Boston Logan, Chicago O'Hare and others joined in on the strike.

Most were pushing for higher wages, but the workers in South Florida wanted to send a message that the fight continues even after getting better pay.

Alyssa Méndez Batista

Hundreds of workers, union members and supporters gathered on Tuesday night in downtown Miami to demand a minimum wage of $15 an hour.


The rally was part of the National Day of Action, a nationwide event during which different industry workers marched in protest for higher wages.


Creative Commons via Flickr / Maarten Visser (https://flic.kr/p/9C1JUP)

Many of the lowest paid workers at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International airport have moved one step closer to what’s considered a “living wage” in Broward County.

For the past several years,  workers like baggage handlers, skycaps and wheelchair assistants at the airport have been fighting to be covered by the Broward County living wage ordinance,  which would bring minimum wages to $11.68 for workers with health benefits and $13.20 for workers without.

gnerk on Flickr

A Broward County small-business owner is giving his employees hefty raises.

Andrew Green is the owner and CEO of Green Solutions in Fort Lauderdale. He recently decided to give his workers raises of between 35 and 50 percent.

“The responsibility lies on you to make sure that they can have a living wage without stressing day to day if they can make ends meet," says Green.

FIU Adjunct Professors Want Better Working Conditions

Feb 25, 2015
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Wednesday is National Adjunct Walkout Day. Adjuncts are part-time college professors who get paid lower wages, as compared to permanent employees, and have no benefits. Florida International University adjuncts want change.

About 30 people gathered at FIU's south campus by a large water fountain. Full-time instructors, part-time instructors and even students came out to support adjunct professors.

Zack Mccarthy / Flickr


Florida’s minimum wage will be going up Jan. 1, but the increase won’t necessarily put more money in the pockets of minimum wage workers. The 12 cent increase from $7.93 an hour to $8.05 an hour is not meant to increase wages, it’s just supposed to make sure wages aren’t decreasing due to inflation.

The new Florida minimum wage is almost a dollar more than the federal minimum wage, but still not the $10.10 President Obama was championing for all workers last year.

Tom Hudson

Lionel Lightbourne has been a social worker in Liberty City for four years. He says he is a "fish in water" with his chosen profession. He speaks with passion about empowering families and children in need.

If he were single, he says his income would put him just above the poverty line. "But together with my wife," he says, "we will actually be in the middle class."

Flickr / elycefeliz

Labor Day was created to celebrate the country’s labor movement and its social and economic achievements, but a new study from FIU’s Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy (RISEP) may dampen some of this year’s celebration.

Tax Credits/ Flickr

Tuesday morning was one of the few times fast-food workers publicly protested lower wages in Miami, joining the dozens of cities that hosted protesters back in December. The protest coincided with the release of a new study from FIU's Research Institute of Social and Economic Policy which, among other things, looks at the intersection of low-paying jobs and wage theft.

Wilson Sayre went to the protest:

Creative commons courtesy of Flickr user Images_of_Money

Workers wages and salaries grew 2.4 percent over the past 12 months. That's down from 2.6-percent growth half a year ago. Which not only means there has not been a lot of growth, but that what we have had is slowing.

On top of that, total compensation, which includes things like salaries plus health benefits and bonuses, has not been growing at a comparable rate.

As the wage growth slows, other costs of living like housing, food and transportation continues to rise at a much higher rate--putting more pressure on peoples’ pockets.